Search results

1 – 10 of over 126000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Spinder Dhaliwal and David Gray

The Asian business community has been noted for its contribution to the UK economy. This vibrant sector of the small to medium‐sized enterprises population serves to…

Abstract

Purpose

The Asian business community has been noted for its contribution to the UK economy. This vibrant sector of the small to medium‐sized enterprises population serves to illustrate diversity in terms of spanning sectors including manufacturing and services, entertainment and fashion, hotels and property, food and pharmaceuticals. This paper seeks to draw out trends within this increasingly important sector of the economy.

Design/methodology/approach

The study reports on a research project which comprises the latest phase in a seven‐year, longitudinal study of the richest 200 Asian business people in the UK.

Findings

The analysis suggests that the Asian business community has delivered significant and sustained growth which is higher than average growth in the UK.

Originality/value

For policy makers and the business support community, this paper offers a greater understanding of the dynamics behind the success stories and thus offers opportunities to tailor any engagement with this community appropriately. For academics it adds to the growing literature of minority ethnic businesses in the UK.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

Content available
Article

N. Nurmala, Sander de Leeuw and Wout Dullaert

The aim of this paper is to conduct a systematic literature review to understand the state of the art of partnerships between humanitarian organizations and business

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to conduct a systematic literature review to understand the state of the art of partnerships between humanitarian organizations and business corporations in managing humanitarian logistics.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review is conducted based on the steps proposed by Denyer and Tranfield (2009). The context-intervention-mechanism-outcome (CIMO) logic is applied to identify the state of the art of partnerships between humanitarian organizations and business corporations in humanitarian logistics. Thirty-six papers related to the topic are extracted from recognized journal databases and then classified into four categories based on the CIMO logic: situational context, intervention factors, mechanisms and outcomes.

Findings

The study shows that while the context and mechanisms for developing cross-sector partnerships between the humanitarian and the business sector have been examined and illuminated by many researchers, additional research (in particular, empirical studies) is needed to measure outcomes as well as the contributions of partnerships to the performance of humanitarian logistics. In addition to synthesizing the literature in this area, this study also presents challenges of such partnerships.

Practical implications

The study improves the understanding of the state of cross-sector partnerships in humanitarian logistics as well as identifies opportunities for future research in this area. The study provides reasons and motives of initiating humanitarian–business partnerships in humanitarian logistics as well as their mechanisms and potential outcomes. This may help in developing successful logistics partnerships with each other.

Originality/value

This is the first systematic literature review to examine the nature of partnerships between humanitarian organizations and business corporations in humanitarian logistics using CIMO logic.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Michael H. Morris, Leyland F. Pitt and Pierre Berthon

Extensive attention has been given in recent years to the role of entrepreneurship in facilitating global economic development, with research indicating that much…

Abstract

Extensive attention has been given in recent years to the role of entrepreneurship in facilitating global economic development, with research indicating that much employment growth originates from the “entrepreneurial sector” of the economy. In many parts of the world, emphasis has also been placed on the so‐called “informal sector” (comprising all activities that fall outside the formal net of registered, taxed, licensed, statistically documented business enterprises) as a contributor to the economic welfare of society. Aims to explore further the nature of the informal sector, and specifically, to distinguish entrepreneurial from non‐entrepreneurial business activity within this sector. Describes the results of a series of in‐depth interviews with owners from a cross‐section of small businesses located in a black South African township. Identifies a sub‐group of firms that demonstrate relatively strong entrepreneurial orientations and distinguishes this group from the remainder of the sample. Draws implications for theory development, ongoing research, and public policy.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Wendy Smits and Thomas Zwick

This paper analyses why in Germany and The Netherlands the share of apprentices in the business service sector is lower than in other economic sectors. A theoretical…

Abstract

This paper analyses why in Germany and The Netherlands the share of apprentices in the business service sector is lower than in other economic sectors. A theoretical introduction surveys the potential reasons that could be responsible for this. The subsequent empirical analysis shows that the level of skill apprentices gain is the main explanation for the relatively low supply of apprenticeships in German business service enterprises. In The Netherlands, the option to hire skilled employees from full‐time schools instead of training apprentices seems to be crucial. For these reasons, this paper proposes to offer obligatory extra formal training in areas such as IT skills and foreign languages for the apprentices in business service firms in Germany in order to increase the attractiveness of the dual apprenticeship system for prospective apprentices as well as business service firms.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Janno Reiljan and Ingra Paltser

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the international position of Estonia among the member states of the EU and countries closely associated with the EU, from the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the international position of Estonia among the member states of the EU and countries closely associated with the EU, from the perspective of the effect of research and development (R & D) policy on innovation activities in the business sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on existing scientific research literature on the relationships between R & D policy and business sector R & D activities and innovation performance, a set of indicators describing R & D policy measures was created for the business sector. Using principal component analysis (PCA) method, independent robust dimensions of R & D policy were brought out. After eliminating the problem of multicollinearity in R & D policy indicators, robust multiple regression models were conducted to present a comprehensive empirical description of the shaping of business sector R & D and innovation activities in the sample of investigated countries.

Findings

Based on the literature, the influences of R & D policy measures on business sector R & D activities and innovation performance were systemised; public R & D policy dimensions were empirically defined; the intensity of R & D policy influence on business sector R & D activities was estimated; the differences between real and prognostic values of business sector performance indicators in Estonia were calculated in order to characterise the efficiency of Estonian R & D policy and the influence of the socioeconomic environment.

Research limitations/implications

The lack of comparable data describing R & D policy and R & D activities and innovation performance in the business sector limits the comprehensiveness of the analysis (i.e. the number of analysed indicators).

Practical implications

The assessment and comparative analysis of the influence of R & D policy components on business sector R & D activities and innovation performance in different countries makes it possible to identify directions for increasing the efficiency of R & D policy under the specific influence of the socioeconomic environment, especially in new member states of the EU.

Originality/value

Using the PCA method significantly increased the robustness of the macro-quantitative description of R & D policy dimensions. By combining the set of new synthetic R & D policy indicators created by the PCA with the multiple regression analysis method, a significant increase in the robustness of model coefficients (i.e. the assessments of influence intensity) was achieved. These robust models create the basis for reliable empirical assessment of the influence of R & D policy and a comparative analysis of the results.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Laurent Bompar, Renaud Lunardo and Camille Saintives

While humor is known to help relational outcomes, its usefulness for sellers to build strong relationships with their business partners and achieve performance remain…

Abstract

Purpose

While humor is known to help relational outcomes, its usefulness for sellers to build strong relationships with their business partners and achieve performance remain unknown. Specifically, humor styles (constructive versus offensive) and business sectors (service-based versus other) may play an important role. To fill this gap in extant marketing literature, this study aims to test the effects of humor styles among salespersons of different business sectors on relationship quality and business performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This research paper derives hypotheses from prior studies referring to humor effects in psychology and management, business-to-business and relationship marketing literature. The hypotheses are tested using a sample of 175 salespersons operating across different business sectors.

Findings

While constructive humor is shown to have positive effects on relationship quality and business performance regardless of business sectors, a different pattern is found for offensive humor. Specifically, the results show that business sector moderates the effects of this type of humor, which has negative effects on relationship quality and business performance, but only when used by salespersons in non-service-based business sectors.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of the research concern the cultural context. The lack of responses from salespersons from different countries may be considered as a direction for future studies exploring connections between humor usage and culture in business-to-business marketing.

Practical implications

This study brings strategic insights into how to use humor in a business-to-business context.

Originality/value

To the best of the author’s knowledge, no previous study has thus far examined the proposed set of inter-related research constructs.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Rami M. Ayoubi, Kahla Alzarif and Bayan Khalifa

The purpose of this paper is to compare the desired employability skills of business graduates in Syria from the perspective of both higher education policymakers and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare the desired employability skills of business graduates in Syria from the perspective of both higher education policymakers and employers in the private sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews were conducted with 12 higher education policymakers and managers from the business sector. Content analysis was utilized to analyse the content of the interviews and the strategic priorities of the higher education sector in Syria.

Findings

Results revealed that although higher education policymakers focus more on societal, public and thinking skills for business graduates, the business sector focusses more on individual, private and practical skills. Accordingly, a comparative tool that aligns the two perspectives was developed in the study. The tool, based on the contradicting employability skills, identified four types of business graduates: leader, collective, technical and trainee.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited by data collected before the current political instability in Syria in 2012. The data were collected only from official documents and interviews with policymakers and employers. Students were not part of the study.

Practical implications

The managerial tool developed at the end of the study will help both policymakers and the private sector to statistically allocate business graduates for better planning. The study provides recommendations to the different stakeholders in the higher education sector in Syria.

Originality/value

Although the majority of the previous literature raises the voices of the business sector, this study is one of the first studies that aligns the discrepant perspectives of the higher education and business sectors. The managerial tool developed in the study is original and usable by policymakers and the business sector, and it is subject to further development.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 59 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Gerald Vinten, David A. Lane and Nicky Hayes

There can be no doubt that the small and medium sized enterprise (SME) plays a pivotal role in most if not all economies, and that social policy makers have an interest in…

Abstract

There can be no doubt that the small and medium sized enterprise (SME) plays a pivotal role in most if not all economies, and that social policy makers have an interest in ensuring the viability of this sector of the economy, which plays a crucial role in the contract culture of national and international competitiveness. Quite apart from the essential symbiosis between the large multinationals and public limited companies and this sector, the sustainability of unemployment benefit payouts would be jeopardised should the sector experience a significant downturn. There are already worldwide concerns about the ability to continue to finance state pensions at anything like the present scale, and any loss of viability of the SME sector will simply exacerbate this situation. There are also useful reciprocations to be achieved by comparisons across sectors, including in significant areas such as internal control (Vinten, Lane, Hayes, 1996). The recent flurry of activity has included initiatives of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of England and Wales 1996) and the information needs of owners (Institute of Chartered Accountants of England and Wales 1996a), an Auditing Practices Board (1996) Practice Note, and a Department of Trade and Industry Consultation Document (DTI 1996).

Details

Management Research News, vol. 20 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Colin C. Williams

Until now, in the absence of direct survey data, economists have had to rely on indirect methods that employ proxy indicators to evaluate the size of the shadow economy…

Abstract

Purpose

Until now, in the absence of direct survey data, economists have had to rely on indirect methods that employ proxy indicators to evaluate the size of the shadow economy. The purpose of this paper is to report the results of the first direct survey of business perceptions of the magnitude of the shadow economy.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reports the results of a UK survey of business perceptions about the prevalence of the shadow economy in their sector, namely the Small Business Service's 2004/2005 Small Business Survey of 7,505 small businesses.

Findings

Some 14 per cent of UK small businesses report that they are negatively affected by the shadow economy, with the average size of shadow work being estimated as 8 per cent of trade in their sector. The sectors identified as most affected by the shadow economy are land transport, construction, the motor vehicle trade, and hotels and restaurants, with new businesses and peripheral regions most affected.

Research limitations/implications

This survey is based on business perceptions of its magnitude in their sector rather than first‐hand accounts of the amount of shadow work that businesses conduct.

Practical implications

These results display that it is wholly possible to conduct more direct surveys on the magnitude of the shadow economy so as to facilitate targeted public policy action.

Originality/value

This is the first direct survey in the advanced economies of business perceptions regarding the magnitude of the shadow economy.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

J.M.P. Venter and B. de Clercq

In his 2006 State of the Nation Address, President Thabo Mbeki indicated that the regulatory environment for small businesses would be improved, as this sector plays an…

Abstract

In his 2006 State of the Nation Address, President Thabo Mbeki indicated that the regulatory environment for small businesses would be improved, as this sector plays an important role in the national strategy for accelerated and shared growth. The aim of this study is to determine whether the size of an enterprise and the sector in which the enterprise operates has an impact on how the enterprise’s tax responsibilities are administered and managed. A survey was conducted amongst small and medium enterprises in the manufacturing, retail and business services sectors in Gauteng. The study focused on Gauteng because the majority of small, medium and microenterprises (SMMEs) are located in this province. The study found that most small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in the business services sector outsource their tax responsibilities because they lack the time needed to manage these functions. It was also found that the size and type of organisation affects the role taxation inputs play in business decisions. The SMEs included in the survey preferred a reduction in interest and penalties charged as a taxation relief measure.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1022-2529

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 126000