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1 – 10 of over 20000
Article
Publication date: 22 April 2020

Saad Zighan and Ahmed EL-Qasem

This paper explores the applications of lean thinking in re-evaluating the business school curriculum, syllabus and intended learning objectives to enhance the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores the applications of lean thinking in re-evaluating the business school curriculum, syllabus and intended learning objectives to enhance the employability of graduates through identifying and eliminating non–value-added activities.

Design/methodology/approach

The research employed multilevel qualitative methodology, where 55 semi-structured interviews were conducted to collect data from academics, students and graduates from several private and public universities in Jordan.

Findings

The study finds that the application of lean thinking in the business school is twofold – it helps the developer of the school curriculum to get rid of many superfluous and non–value-added activities and also emphasises and reinforces the value-added activities. Value stream mapping, with a consideration for internal and external outputs, has been found to be a useful tool for developing an employability-focussed curriculum that equips business school students with the required competences and skills in the labour market.

Research limitations/implications

The study is based on a qualitative research approach. The generalisability of the findings is difficult to assess, and future research would benefit from the insights obtained from the quantitative data

Practical implications

In practice, this study has identified different types of non–value-added and unnecessary activities in business school curriculum and has made suggestions for the development of a more employability-focussed curriculum.

Originality/value

This paper investigates the non–value-added activities of the business school curriculum, syllabus and the intended learning objectives to enhance the employability of graduates in Jordan.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 70 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 June 2014

Peter Beusch

The purpose of this paper is to account for, and conceptualize, the internal and external forces that influence higher education business schools as they strive to…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to account for, and conceptualize, the internal and external forces that influence higher education business schools as they strive to integrate sustainability issues into their curricula in the effort to achieve a more sustainable (yet capitalist) world.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach is used for the research, which is grounded in the relevant literature, to investigate sustainable development issues in the context of a Swedish business school (university level). The empirical data consists of a review of internal documents plus e-mail surveys and interviews and discussion seminars with university teachers/researchers and key administrators.

Findings

Two tentative models are presented that map the various internal and external forces behind business schoolscurriculum change. One important finding describes how supply and demand influences business schools and recruiters of business students.

Research limitations/implications

Because this research is based on a single case study, the analysis and the mapping in the paper are somewhat limited in their general applicability. However, the research context of the business school permits drawing conclusions that may apply to a broad class of colleges or departments in higher education. In addition, because the research is supported by significant ideas from the literature, general inferences may be drawn about business school curricula.

Originality/value

The two tentative models provide a holistic framework that adds to the understanding of the composition and interrelationship of influential forces on business schools when major changes in curricula and their management are contemplated.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 July 2018

Langton Mburayi and Tony Wall

Whereas the integration of sustainability into business schools has received increasing attention in recent years, the debate continues to be generic rather than…

Abstract

Purpose

Whereas the integration of sustainability into business schools has received increasing attention in recent years, the debate continues to be generic rather than recognising the peculiarities of the more quantitative sub disciplines such as accounting and finance which may of course be intimately linked to professional standards. The purpose of this paper, therefore, is to examine the extent to which sustainability is integrated into accounting and finance curricula in business schools, how, and to understand some of the challenges of doing so.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents the findings from a systematic form of literature review which draws on the previous literature about how sustainability is embedded into business school curricula and the challenges in doing so. A particular focus is placed on how the ways in which sustainability is integrated into accounting and finance curricula in business schools.

Findings

The paper demonstrates that accounting and finance lags behind other management disciplines in embedding sustainability and that institutional commitment is oftentimes a strong imperative for effective integration of sustainability.

Practical implications

This paper is a call to practitioners and researchers alike to explore new ways of integrating sustainability in the accounting and finance curricula, including working across boundaries to provide learning opportunities for future accountants, financial managers and generalist managers.

Originality/value

The paper offers an original analysis and synthesis of the literature in the context of the accounting and finance curricula in business schools, and proposed a conceptual framework to further develop sustainability education in the context of business schools.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

Bronston T. Mayes, Dorothy Heide and Ephraim Smith

A survey was mailed to the deans of AACSB accredited schools and 50 per cent of the non‐accredited AACSB affiliates, to determine their perceptions of how the changes in…

Abstract

A survey was mailed to the deans of AACSB accredited schools and 50 per cent of the non‐accredited AACSB affiliates, to determine their perceptions of how the changes in accreditation criteria might affect their curricula and what methods might be used to make these changes. The sample was classified according to the Porter‐McKibbin categories and significant differences were found among these categories for perceived ease of accreditation; changes in programme quality; resource allocation changes; use of mission statements in decision making; curriculum component emphasis, and curriculum evaluation methods. While the overall amount of change expected in the next five years seems modest, the nature of the changes expected could have significant effects on the curricula of US business schools.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 June 2021

Nancy E. Landrum

This paper aims to learn how sustainability and the circular economy were being integrated into the curriculum of a Dutch university and to transfer that knowledge back to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to learn how sustainability and the circular economy were being integrated into the curriculum of a Dutch university and to transfer that knowledge back to a US university business school curriculum. Given the resistance toward integrating sustainability into the US business school curriculum, the Dutch university served as a role model for education for sustainable development.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study used ethnographic methods of participant observation over a four-month residency at the Dutch university.

Findings

Themes observed are as follows: success in the current context relied upon sustainability being integrated into the culture and lifestyle, legislative enforcement, a focus on urban sustainability, use of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and collaboration as a key to success. The course proposal shifted to a class on the SDGs which is broader, more inclusive, and interdisciplinary. The proposal to integrate circular economy into the US business school curriculum shifted to a class on the SDGs. It was determined that the SDGs presented a more amenable approach to introduce sustainability into the business school curriculum and meet the objectives of education for sustainable development.

Research limitations/implications

This case study is based upon the author’s experience at one university in the Netherlands. Limitations include the generalizability of the findings to another university as well as the question of transferability across cultures.

Practical implications

This case study offers one suggestion for integrating sustainability into the business school curriculum.

Social implications

Integrating sustainability into the business school curriculum through the SDGs might help overcome resistance.

Originality/value

The findings offer an alternative approach for integrating sustainability into the business school curriculum that is aligned with AACSB standards and which might face less resistance.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 May 2011

David J. Teece

This paper aims to recommend dynamic capabilities as an integrative framework for the business school curriculum.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to recommend dynamic capabilities as an integrative framework for the business school curriculum.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper discusses the history, sources, and consequences of the disciplinary fragmentation of most curricula. There is a determined effort to draw on all the relevant social science disciplines along with practice to create an intellectually coherent, interdisciplinary framework.

Findings

The dynamic capabilities framework can provide guidance for integrating the curriculum across disciplines and between theory and practice.

Social implications

Implementation along the lines proposed will give students more of what they need and allow business schools to graduate individuals with a better chance of managing organizations in fast‐changing environments exposed to strong global competition.

Originality/value

The application of one of the dominant paradigms in management studies is proposed as a framework for integrating and enhancing the entire business school curriculum. There is no other framework that purports to do so in an intellectually coherent manner.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2016

Ralf Spiller, Stefan Weinacht and Andreas Köhler

Communication studies have expanded significantly around the globe in the last decades. Due to new channels of communication and more and more mediatised societies, the…

Abstract

Communication studies have expanded significantly around the globe in the last decades. Due to new channels of communication and more and more mediatised societies, the role of communication has gained significance. In contrast, communication does not seem to be a topic of high priority for many corporate leaders. They often still value communication as a mere support function.

This chapter explores communication courses of business schools in the United States and Europe. It is hypothesised that only if communication courses are recognised in such programmes the profession of business communicators will realise entry into the highest levels of corporate decision-making.

The main question is how far top-ranked Master of Business Administration (MBA) programmes integrate communication courses. This is investigated via website analysis and interviews. This chapter also provides explanations for the current status quo. The results will be of interest to all those responsible for shaping MBA curricula and give insights into how the communication discipline is viewed by leaders of business schools.

Details

The Management Game of Communication
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-716-8

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Manuel Larrán Jorge, Francisco Javier Andrades Peña and Maria Jose Muriel de los Reyes

This paper aims to examine how the Master of Business Administration (MBA) curricula of top-ranked business schools are offering stand-alone courses on ethics and…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how the Master of Business Administration (MBA) curricula of top-ranked business schools are offering stand-alone courses on ethics and corporate social responsibility (CSR). To provide additional evidence, this study tests some hypotheses to contrast the effect of different variables on the inclusion of stand-alone courses on ethics and CSR. Also, the paper provides a comparative analysis in two ways: one comparison aims to analyse how the presence of ethics and CSR stand-alone courses in the MBA programmes over the past 10 years has evolved, and the other comparison seeks to explore whether there are differences between different rankings with regard to the inclusion of ethics and CSR stand-alone courses in the MBA curricula.

Design/methodology/approach

A Web content analysis was conducted on the curricula of 92 of the top 100 global MBA programmes ranked by the Financial Times in their 2013 ratings.

Findings

The findings show that there is a trend towards the inclusion of stand-alone courses on CSR and ethics as electives. Empirically, the findings suggest that the presence of ethics and CSR elective stand-alone subjects in the MBA programmes is explained by the following variables: public/private, business school’s accreditation and cultural influence. Comparatively, the findings suggest that requiring CSR and business ethics stand-alone courses in the MBA programmes ranked by the Financial Times have not increased over the past 10 years. In addition, when we have compared the results of this study with other rankings, we have appreciated that there are important differences between top MBA programmes in accordance with the aims and scope of rankings.

Originality/value

The findings of this study seem to suggest that business schools included in the Financial Times ranking have not changed their view based on a shareholder approach, which is focused on providing an economics-centred training.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 August 2014

Nelson A. Barber, Fiona Wilson, Venky Venkatachalam, Sara M. Cleaves and Josina Garnham

This paper aims to demonstrate how sustainable development education can be implemented at business schools, despite institutional barriers, through innovative and…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to demonstrate how sustainable development education can be implemented at business schools, despite institutional barriers, through innovative and collaborative relationships with internal and external stakeholders. Businesses are beginning to accept their social responsibility through proactive approaches to maximizing their net social contribution, embracing opportunities and managing risks resulting from their economic, environmental and social impacts. Yet, many business schools are lagging in integration of sustainability into their curriculum, and as a result are not adequately educating future business leaders.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study presents the challenges in developing and implementing sustainability education, as well as analyzes the various underlying drivers of these barriers. The paper provides a detailed description of some of the ways one business school has overcome these barriers, and provides generalizable insights that can help other business schools and universities understand how they can engage in the implementation of similar sustainable development programs.

Findings

As business educators, we should reevaluate our role and our focus. Through education, interdisciplinary collaboration, research and community and industry engagement, sustainability can become firmly established within the existing value structure of business schools.

Originality/value

While many business schools worldwide are discussing the importance of integrating sustainability into their curricula, and while employers and students are demanding the same, few business schools have genuinely made progress in meeting these demands. This paper presents both the challenges to integrating sustainability and an in-depth study of one business school’s approach to creating unique and innovative solutions to overcome these barriers.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

Curtis W. Cook

With the accelerated impact of external forces on business schoolacademic programmes, a key question that faculty and administrators mustaddress is whether to continue to…

Abstract

With the accelerated impact of external forces on business school academic programmes, a key question that faculty and administrators must address is whether to continue to pursue incremental curriculum extensions (the traditional approach) or to undertake large‐scale reform and innovation efforts. A case is made that bold thrusts at large‐scale change are more likely to enhance educational relevance, invigorate faculty, and draw the B‐school closer to its primary customer‐the corporate community. Offers a propositional framework, built on seven principles of change applied directly to the process of curriculum change. Each proposition is supported with one or two mini cases drawn from experience within a large, publicly‐assisted university. By building on a series of bold, curriculum thrusts that include constituencies as active partners, a school will transform its character and strengthen quality.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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