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Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2016

Donna Y. Ford, Gilman W. Whiting and Ramon B. Goings

As the United States continues to see an increase in biracial and multiracial citizens, there has been limited scholarship on gifted students who identify as biracial

Abstract

As the United States continues to see an increase in biracial and multiracial citizens, there has been limited scholarship on gifted students who identify as biracial and/or multiracial. Thus, this chapter seeks to fill this void in the literature. We discuss demographics for self-identified biracial/multiracial persons, share two biracial or multiracial identity development models, and describe the characteristics of gifted biracial/multiracial students. We conclude this chapter with recommendations for education professionals and families to support this unique group of students.

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Gifted Children of Color Around the World: Diverse Needs, Exemplary Practices, and Directions for the Future
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-119-4

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Book part
Publication date: 25 November 2019

Roudi Nazarinia Roy, Yolanda Mitchell, Anthony James, Byron Miller and Jessica Hutchinson

The transition to motherhood has been studied extensively, but primarily among participants in homogenous race/ethnicity relationships. The aim of the current study was to…

Abstract

The transition to motherhood has been studied extensively, but primarily among participants in homogenous race/ethnicity relationships. The aim of the current study was to explore the lived experiences of a diverse group of women in biracial and monoracial relationships experiencing the transition to motherhood (e.g., biracial or monoracial motherhood). Informed by the symbolic interaction framework, in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted to investigate the expectations and experiences of first-time motherhood on a sample of 12 U.S. women. Their diverse stories contained multiple themes including an overarching theme of racial/ethnic differences in appropriate infant care, which surfaces during engagement in family and social support interactions. This analysis emphasizes the need for more diverse portrayals of motherhood. We discuss our findings in light of the literature and implications for future research and practice.

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Book part
Publication date: 12 February 2001

Monica Hardesty

This chapter presents an interpretive study of the biracial experience in contemporary America. Twenty adolescents and young adults, who have one Black parent and one…

Abstract

This chapter presents an interpretive study of the biracial experience in contemporary America. Twenty adolescents and young adults, who have one Black parent and one White parent, participated in life history interviews exploring their lifelong racial experiences and the creative nature of self. The cultural isolation of living betwixt and between racial categories initiates an existential journey of self-reflection and identity adjustment. Several themes in their lives are repeated: the experience of oneself as something other than an assigned racial identity, a tension between internally perceived and externally imposed definitions of self, the desire to be authentic in one's self definitions, and the will to create one's own racial identity. To resolve the dilemmas of race, the biracial individual moves from an encapsulated to a constructive self. The biracial experience of negating conventional racial formations offers the possibility of a more universal meaning of race.

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Studies in Symbolic Interaction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-090-6

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Book part
Publication date: 15 October 2013

Cardell K. Jacobson and Darron T. Smith

In this chapter, we use the concepts of emotional labor or emotion work to examine the experiences of transracial families – white families rearing Black adoptees. We…

Abstract

In this chapter, we use the concepts of emotional labor or emotion work to examine the experiences of transracial families – white families rearing Black adoptees. We focus on the emotion work done by the parents to inculcate and develop positive racial identities for their adoptive children as their adoptees experience racial mistreatment. We also use the concept of white racial framing to examine strategies for effectively coping with racial mistreatment. African Americans have more emotion work than the members of dominant group because of their status as stigmatized minorities in American society. African Americans adopted by white families have even greater emotion work because they tend to have the extra burden of living in predominately white communities where there are fewer people of color to serve as positive role models in the socialization process.

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Visions of the 21st Century Family: Transforming Structures and Identities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-028-4

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Book part
Publication date: 18 November 2004

Judith A. Chafel and Carin Neitzel

What are children’s responses to storybook characters portrayed as socioeconomically disadvantaged? Do these responses vary by gender, race, socioeconomic status, and…

Abstract

What are children’s responses to storybook characters portrayed as socioeconomically disadvantaged? Do these responses vary by gender, race, socioeconomic status, and setting? Sixty-two 8-year-old-children individually listened and responded to a story about a soup kitchen using two different communication systems: drawings and words. Categories generated from the data were analyzed using chi-square analyses, yielding statistically significant findings for each of the variables of interest. Results offer a unique, detailed picture of the conceptual schemas of 8-year-old children about poverty.

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Social Contexts of Early Education, and Reconceptualizing Play (II)
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-146-0

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Book part
Publication date: 18 December 2016

Ashley Macrander and Rachelle Winkle-Wagner

Amidst changing national racial demographics, multiracial college students have begun reframing how postsecondary institutions define diverse campus environments. Interest…

Abstract

Amidst changing national racial demographics, multiracial college students have begun reframing how postsecondary institutions define diverse campus environments. Interest in how multiracial students self-identify has grown; yet, their identity development remains a complex and largely undefined process. This chapter examines how multiracial students navigated their identity development at a predominantly White institution (PWI). In particular, we connect Renn’s (2004) multiracial identity patterns with the philosophical idea of recognition desires. Findings indicated that White peers’ recognition (or misrecognition) of racial categories moderated multiracial students’ situational identities, particularly their agency with respect to self-identifying their race.

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The Crisis of Race in Higher Education: A Day of Discovery and Dialogue
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-710-6

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Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2018

Remi Joseph-Salisbury

Abstract

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Black Mixed-Race Men
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-531-9

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Book part
Publication date: 11 July 2017

Tambra O. Jackson, Ashley Ballard, Marena Drewery, Brianna Membres, Laryn Morgan and Felicia J. Nicholson

In this chapter, we present an analysis of the literature on preservice teachers of Color juxtaposed with the experiences of Ashley, Marena, Brianna, Laryn, and Felicia…

Abstract

In this chapter, we present an analysis of the literature on preservice teachers of Color juxtaposed with the experiences of Ashley, Marena, Brianna, Laryn, and Felicia that gives insight into the ways in which these women of Color describe their understandings of social justice and culturally relevant teaching and the importance it holds for their work as future teachers. Using both culturally relevant pedagogy and critical race theory, we describe critical incidents from their racialized experiences in their teacher education program, inclusive of how they perceived having a Black professor for a diversity course. Lastly, we conclude the chapter with suggestions they deem as beneficial to their development and growth as social justice educators for teacher education programs to consider.

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Black Female Teachers
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-462-0

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Book part
Publication date: 11 August 2014

Robert Harrison and Kevin Thomas

The purpose of this chapter is to explore the intersection of identity, culture, and consumption as it relates to multiracial identity development.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this chapter is to explore the intersection of identity, culture, and consumption as it relates to multiracial identity development.

Methodology/approach

The authors employed a phenomenological approach wherein 21 multiracial women were interviewed to understanding the lived experience and meaning of multiracial identity development.

Findings

Findings of this study indicate that multiracial consumers engage with the marketplace to assuage racial discordance and legitimize the liminal space they occupy.

Research implications

While there is much research related to the variety of ways marketing and consumption practices intersect with identity (re)formation, researchers have focused much of their attention on monoracial populations. This research identifies and fills a gap in the literature related to how multiple racial backgrounds complicate this understanding.

Practical implications

Due to their growing social visibility and recognized buying power, multiracial individuals have emerged as a viable consumer segment among marketers. However, there is a dearth of research examining how multiracial populations experience the marketplace.

Originality/value

This study provides a better understanding of the ways in which multiracial individuals utilize consumption practices as a means of developing and expressing their racial identity.

Details

Consumer Culture Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-811-2

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Book part
Publication date: 1 October 2008

Matthew Oware

This chapter examines whether the racial identification of mixed-race adolescents can be understood through several theories: Status Maximization Theory, the rule of…

Abstract

This chapter examines whether the racial identification of mixed-race adolescents can be understood through several theories: Status Maximization Theory, the rule of hypodescent, or social identity theory. Status Maximization theory posits that mixed-race adolescents will attempt to identify as the highest racial status group they possibly can. The rule of hypodescent or hypodescent theory, also known as the one-drop rule, is a legacy of the Plantation-era South and prescribes that mixed-race individuals identify as their lowest status racial identity. Social identity theory posits that the higher frequency or quality of contacts with parents or individuals in mixed-race adolescents’ peer networks affect the racial identification of mixed-race adolescents. Also, social identity contends that a mixed-race adolescent's intergroup dynamic (measured here as a child's level of self-esteem, whether there is prejudice at school, and a child's self-concept) dictates how he or she will racially identify. Through analyses of mixed-race adolescents in the National Longitudinal Adolescent Health (Add Health), I find that Asian-white and American-Indian-white adolescents do not status maximize nor abide by hypodescent, while black-white adolescents do not status maximize but do adhere to hypodescent when forced to choose one race. There is no tendency for the frequency or quality of contact with parents, romantic partners, or school composition to affect racial identity, as predicted by social identity theory. Yet, several of the aforementioned social-psychological variables are found to influence the racial identification of mixed-race adolescents. Specifically, whether they felt positively about school, if they experienced prejudice, whether they had higher levels of self-esteem, and if they felt socially accepted by their peers. Another key finding from this research suggests that racial identification for Asian-white and American-Indian-white adolescents are both fluid and optional; this is not the case for black-white adolescents. I conclude by offering the implications of these findings for black-white multiracial individuals.

Details

Biculturalism, Self Identity and Societal Transformation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1409-6

1 – 10 of 216