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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2007

Shann Turnbull

The purpose of the paper is to show how the sustainability of urban settlements can be improved by treating as a variable the design of property rights: to realty…

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1320

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to show how the sustainability of urban settlements can be improved by treating as a variable the design of property rights: to realty, corporations, and currencies, and the communication and control architecture of communities.

Design/methodology/approach

System science shows how the resulting increases in the richness and variety of communication and control channels improve the governance of urban precincts. The new variables also provide a way to integrate the design of the built environment into the design of its governance architecture. The scope of orthodox economic analysis is extended to include the value of assets and liabilities to provide additional feedback signals. This more holistic economic framework increases the richness of the “semiotic” channel of social communication and control that complements those based on senses, words and prices.

Findings

The analysis reveals self‐reinforcing feed‐forward and feedback channels between the use and maintenance of the built environment and its governance architecture not available in less holistic design frameworks.

Practical implications

The paper identifies the need for urban planners to extend their discipline to become governance architects and how the knowledge of system scientists can be applied to improve the design of capitalism.

Originality/value

A new design paradigm is identified that allows improvements to be introduced in the ability of towns or suburbs, to become self‐financing, self‐governing political units. The paradigm identifies how capitalism can be designed to become more efficient, equitable, responsive, and democratic.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 36 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2012

Marijn Janssen and Bram Klievink

Scant attention has been given to the role of enterprise architecture (EA) in relationship to risk management in information system development projects. Even less…

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1665

Abstract

Purpose

Scant attention has been given to the role of enterprise architecture (EA) in relationship to risk management in information system development projects. Even less attention has been given to the inter‐organizational setting. The aim of this paper is to better understand this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The relationship between EA and project failure/success is investigated by – through a workshop – creating a retrospective view on the use of architectures in large and complex ICT‐projects.

Findings

Failure factors can be grouped in organization network, people, process, product and technology categories. The findings show that a disappointingly limited number of public sector development projects make sufficient use of architecture as a risk management instrument. Architectures should be considered both as a risk‐mitigating instrument and as an organizational shaping routine to reduce project failure and manage risk in organization networks.

Research limitations/implications

A single workshop with a limited number of participants was conducted. The findings need further refinement and generalization based on more empirical research investigating the relationship between architecture and project failure.

Practical implications

Architecture should give explicit consideration to risk management and help to draw attention to this. Governance mechanisms need be defined to ensure that the organizations' members become aware of both architecture and risk management. Risk management and EA have similarities, as they are both an instrument and an organizational shaping routine.

Originality/value

Governments collaborate more and more in organizational networks and for that reason often multiple organizations are involved in information system project developments. Enterprise architecture as a risk mitigation instrument has not, to date, been given attention.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2019

Sandip Mukhopadhyay and Harry Bouwman

Because of the attention increasingly being focused on digital transformation, interest in business models of platform-enabled ecosystems is rising rapidly. Although there…

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1295

Abstract

Purpose

Because of the attention increasingly being focused on digital transformation, interest in business models of platform-enabled ecosystems is rising rapidly. Although there are different theoretical views on the role of ecosystems, a synthesis of research, with a focus on governance and orchestration in dynamic, multi-industry eco-systems, is lacking.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review was conducted by following a rigorous search protocol in the scholarly databases covering both journal articles and conference papers These papers were subsequently filtered, and finally, 48 relevant papers were selected for analysis.

Findings

The review identifies five key aspects of platform governance design that need close consideration: the meta-organisation or ecosystem design, coordination mechanisms, mechanisms for value co-creation, value appropriation mechanisms and architectural principles. To achieve balance among a set of competing demands, platform leaders need to devote adequate attention to these aspects.

Practical implications

Based on a literature review, the authors provide an overview of underlying theoretical views, research methods and key trends to develop a sound theoretical grounding for research on platform governance design. The paper also suggests research gaps in the existing literature and sets directions for researchers to strengthen the understanding of effective platform governance design. The paper also provides valuable information to managers in developing or leading a successful platform ecosystem.

Originality/value

The paper uses existing literature published in this topic and original in nature.

Details

Digital Policy, Regulation and Governance, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5038

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2018

Gary B. Herrigel

The purpose of this paper is to apply experimentalist framework to understand self-optimizing efforts within German manufacturing multinationals. Benefits and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to apply experimentalist framework to understand self-optimizing efforts within German manufacturing multinationals. Benefits and characteristic obstacles to diffusion are discussed. Mechanisms for combatting obstacles are outlined.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative case studies, interview-based research, processual and reflexive action theory are applied to the governance of manufacturing-based multinational enterprises.

Findings

Uncertainty is an ineradicable element in multinational companies (MNC) FDI operations. Self-optimizing systems, many with an experimentalist character, are a pervasive form of response to this uncertainty. Obstacles to the diffusion and effective operation of self-optimization are chronic and, indeed, endogenously generated. But as a result, so are superordinate efforts to undercut the continuous emergence of obstacles. MNC development is, thus, characterized by continuous self-recomposition.

Research limitations/implications

Implication is that managers and management theorists should focus as much on the management of dynamic process and learning that results in the recomposition of institutional rules as they do on the constraining and enabling effects of those rules.

Practical implications

Superordinate mechanisms for the disruption of incipient insulation and exclusion are crucial for the implementation of successful experimentalist (learning) systems.

Social implications

Transparency, stakeholder involvement in MNC governance processes has positive implications for learning, innovation and competitiveness.

Originality/value

This paper presents the application of experimentalist learning theory to MNC global governance.

Details

critical perspectives on international business, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-2043

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Udo E. Simonis

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211

Abstract

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International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 43 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2020

Wikus Erasmus and Carl Marnewick

Success in the information systems (IS) project domain is elusive despite extensive research on the topic. Governance is seen as the greatest contributor to project…

Abstract

Purpose

Success in the information systems (IS) project domain is elusive despite extensive research on the topic. Governance is seen as the greatest contributor to project success. The purpose of this paper is to investigate and report on the current perceptions and implementation of information technology (IT) governance within IS portfolio management to develop a sub-framework to guide practitioners. This sub-framework forms part of a grand IS project, programme and portfolio governance framework of which this study forms a contributing part.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers followed a mixed-methods approach through utilising Q-methodology and inverted factor analysis.

Findings

The results provided a sub-framework recommending specific IT governance practices to be applied to IS portfolios. The recommendations are categorised as activities to be maintained, enhanced and/or implemented.

Research limitations/implications

The research only had participants from South African organisations and as such cannot be reliably extrapolated to other regions.

Originality/value

The resultant sub-framework provides stakeholders and practitioners involved in IS portfolios an opportunity to examine their own approaches and be confronted with possibilities in their portfolio management activities. Further research to be conducted includes creating a grand framework to address the linkages between portfolio, programme and project management as it relates to IT governance on various strategic levels.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2019

Hildo Meirelles de Souza Filho and Bruno Varella Miranda

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the relationship between the existence of asset specificity and the architecture of the hybrid governance structures adopted by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the relationship between the existence of asset specificity and the architecture of the hybrid governance structures adopted by horticultural smallholders from the Brazilian region of Serra Fluminense.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a negative binomial regression model to analyze 567 transactions carried out by horticultural smallholders from the Brazilian region of Serra Fluminense. Starting from the insights of Oliver Williamson’s transaction cost economics, an indicator is constructed with the goal to capture the degree of intensity of coordination from the adoption of diverse bundles of coordination mechanisms in a governance structure.

Findings

The results show that higher levels of human and physical asset specificity affect the intensity of coordination of the transactions in the sample, leading to the adoption of hybrid forms with more complex bundles of coordination mechanisms.

Research limitations/implications

This paper adds to a growing literature that studies the architecture of complex governance structures. However, its empirical conclusions are exploratory.

Originality/value

The contribution of this paper is twofold. First, quantitative empirical studies that analyze the diversity of hybrid forms in the same industry are relatively rare. This contribution also presents a theoretical discussion that might inform scholars dealing with similar research challenges.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Yongkyun Kim, Hong-Gyoo Sohn, Youngjai Lee and Jong-Moon Chung

Disaster risk reduction (DRR) technology sharing has emerged as an important global issue across national boundaries. As a result, the DRR technology-sharing environment…

Abstract

Purpose

Disaster risk reduction (DRR) technology sharing has emerged as an important global issue across national boundaries. As a result, the DRR technology-sharing environment needs strengthening based on the findings of difficulties in sharing, investment, and commitment. The purpose of this paper is to three fold: first, it will clarify that a web-based platform is the best conduit for linking DRR technology from the supplier to the beneficiary developing countries. Second, it will find the most evolutionary path based on Korean case studies. Finally, it will make recommendations for the efficient implementation of a web-based platform for DRR technology sharing.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper posits that DRR technology sharing is a necessary part of enhancing resilience to disasters in the Asia-Pacific region. The evolution of web-based approaches (a merchandise display-type platform, a journal-type platform, an electronic market-type platform, and an architecture and governance-type platform) and an actual case of space technology sharing providing support for an evolution toward community-based technology sharing in DRR. The research will find the most efficient way going forward based on the case study of a four-year R & D project sponsored by the South Korean Government. It will also find the success factors for the way to establish and operate the platform efficiently and effectively through case studies of the four types of web-based platforms.

Findings

Sharing of DRR technology through a web-based platform among Asia-Pacific countries is necessary in order to equip all parties with essential technology to mitigate intensifying disasters, to overcome the barriers of technology sharing, to breakdown transfer issues due to language barriers, and to strengthen insufficient DRR budgets. Among the four types of web-based platforms, the architecture and governance-type platform proved to be the most effective and efficient. In addition, four principles for an efficient implementation are identified through case studies, analysis, and research.

Originality/value

This paper reports on the reasons why it is difficult for DRR technology sharing in the Asia and Pacific regions and suggests a web-based DRR technology-sharing platform as a solution for the region. Moreover, it substantiates that the architecture and governance platform type as the most efficient and effective evolution with four principles: develop based on end-user’s needs; take a problem-solving approach; contain interactive communication tools; and provide business opportunity.

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Article
Publication date: 16 April 2020

Emmanuel Kopang Botlhale

The purpose of this study is to discuss corporate governance in state-owned enterprises (SOEs) in Lesotho to influence policy debates.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to discuss corporate governance in state-owned enterprises (SOEs) in Lesotho to influence policy debates.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a desktop study that used the qualitative research approach. For this research, the case study method has been adopted. In terms of orientation, this is descriptive research. Data were collected from three-tiered sources: independent publications (e.g. World Bank); government publications; and newspaper articles. Data analysis was in the form of document analysis.

Findings

The study concluded that there are instances of poor and/or bad governance in SOEs in Lesotho. Egregious examples include transgressing against the Public Financial Management Act (2011) and the failure to submit Audited Financial Results.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are limited to a specific case. Nonetheless, there are general lessons that can be drawn for African countries from the case study. A key general lesson is the imperative need to reconfigure the legal-institutional architecture of SOEs so that they create public value.

Practical implications

Other than cataloguing instances of poor and/or bad governance in SOEs in Lesotho, the paper goes further and accordingly makes policy recommendations to enhance corporate governance in SOEs in Lesotho.

Originality/value

There is no academic study on corporate governance in SOEs in Lesotho; therefore, there is a gap in the literature. Hence, the study makes an original contribution to the literature.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Jordi Surroca, Miguel A. García‐Cestona and Lluís Santamaria

This paper builds upon recent advances in the corporate governance framework to extend and complement the economic literature on producer cooperatives. We argue that the…

Abstract

This paper builds upon recent advances in the corporate governance framework to extend and complement the economic literature on producer cooperatives. We argue that the problem of governance in a cooperative is twofold and consists in designing mechanisms and setting up institutions that (1) encourage workers to define a goal that maximizes workers’ welfare and (2) induce managers to pursue and internalize such a broad goal. When compared to capital‐controlled firms, the agency problems become more complex and harder to solve in the cooperative framework. As empirical evidence of this problem and its corresponding solution, we illustrate the case of the Mondragón cooperatives, explaining in detail the incentive system and the control mechanisms now in place in this successful business group. The study of the governance architecture of Mondragón may help us to propose solutions to traditional problems of the cooperative firm and to reach a better understanding of both the governance of cooperatives and corporate governance in general.

Details

Management Research: Journal of the Iberoamerican Academy of Management, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1536-5433

Keywords

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