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Book part
Publication date: 26 June 2012

Brona Russell and Jacob Eisenberg

Affective Events Theory (Weiss & Cropanzano, 1996) proposes a theoretical framework that outlines the structure, antecedents, and consequences of affective experiences at…

Abstract

Affective Events Theory (Weiss & Cropanzano, 1996) proposes a theoretical framework that outlines the structure, antecedents, and consequences of affective experiences at work. We elaborate on Affective Events Theory by incorporating recent theory of attitude and by further exploring the role of work environment features within the model. Our proposed model acknowledges the immediacy of judgment driven as well as affect-driven behavior. It provides a mechanism through which affect-driven or judgment-driven behaviors can be more easily predicted and it shows how work environment features not only make certain events more or less likely but also influence resulting behaviors through attitude formation. We outline the practical application of our model and give direction for future research.

Details

Experiencing and Managing Emotions in the Workplace
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-676-8

Book part
Publication date: 26 September 2005

Claire E. Ashton-James and Neal M. Ashkanasy

Since its publication in 1996, Affective Events Theory (AET) has come to be regarded as the seminal explanation for structure, causes and consequences of affective

Abstract

Since its publication in 1996, Affective Events Theory (AET) has come to be regarded as the seminal explanation for structure, causes and consequences of affective experiences at work. AET does not, however, elucidate why, how, and when objects and events in the workplace trigger moods and emotions which in turn influence cognitive and behavioral outcomes. Consequently, AET does not yet provide us with a theoretical basis upon which to predict the way in which contextual, cognitive, motivational, or individual factors might moderate the impact of workplace events on affective states and subsequent behavior. In this chapter, we outline the central tenets of AET, and review a model of the processes underlying AET, with a view to understanding individual differences in the manifestation and consequences of affect in the workplace.

Details

The Effect of Affect in Organizational Settings
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-234-4

Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2003

Neal M Ashkanasy, Claire E Ashton-James and Peter J Jordan

We review the literature on stress in organizational settings and, based on a model of job insecurity and emotional intelligence by Jordan, Ashkanasy and Härtel (2002)…

Abstract

We review the literature on stress in organizational settings and, based on a model of job insecurity and emotional intelligence by Jordan, Ashkanasy and Härtel (2002), present a new model where affective responses associated with stress mediate the impact of workplace stressors on individual and organizational performance outcomes. Consistent with Jordan et al., emotional intelligence is a key moderating variable. In our model, however, the components of emotional intelligence are incorporated into the process of stress appraisal and coping. The chapter concludes with a discussion of the implications of these theoretical developments for understanding emotional and behavioral responses to workplace.

Details

Emotional and Physiological Processes and Positive Intervention Strategies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-238-2

Book part
Publication date: 7 June 2016

Thomas Lechat and Olivier Torrès

Entrepreneurial activity is particularly rich in affective events, but these affective events are still underexplored compared to salaried work. Nevertheless, in small…

Abstract

Purpose

Entrepreneurial activity is particularly rich in affective events, but these affective events are still underexplored compared to salaried work. Nevertheless, in small organizations, the running of the whole business may easily be impacted by the owner’s negative experiences.

Methodology/approach

To characterize these emotional lows, we undertook a mixed methods research study using a panel of 357 French small business owners. We collected their monthly work events 10 times and semantically categorized the negative ones. We weighted each category on its probability of occurrence and its emotional intensity of stress. Finally, we assessed the contribution of the cumulated events to the risk of burnout.

Findings

The findings of this study comprise a set of affective event categories applicable to business owners and entrepreneurs. Tables are ranked by times cited and intensity. Results of a regression analysis show that intensity of negative events is related to burnout, especially for younger and female employers.

Research implications

The findings of this study extend the affective events framework to self-employed, supply a rigorous and predictive inventory for future surveys

Practical implications

The results offer small business owners as well as carers an “emotional stressometer” to benchmark the aversive events of the entrepreneurial activity.

Social implications

Employer burnout caused by the experience of negative affective events affects the lives of employers and can carry across to non-work life.

Originality/value

This is the first study to develop a comprehensive list of negative affective events specifically for small business owners and entrepreneurs, rather than salaried employees.

Details

Emotions and Organizational Governance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-998-5

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 26 September 2005

Howard M. Weiss and Daniel J. Beal

In the few years since the appearance of Affective Events Theory (AET), organizational research on emotions has continued its accelerating pace and incorporated many…

Abstract

In the few years since the appearance of Affective Events Theory (AET), organizational research on emotions has continued its accelerating pace and incorporated many elements of the macrostructure suggested by AET. In this chapter we reflect upon the original intentions of AET, review the literature that has spoken most directly to these intentions, and discuss where we should go from here. Throughout, we emphasize that AET represented not a testable theory, but rather a different paradigm for studying affect at work. Our review reveals an obvious shift toward AET in the way organizational researchers study affect at work, but also that some elements have been neglected. Ultimately, we see the most fruitful research coming from further delineation of the underlying processes implicated by the macrostructure of AET.

Details

The Effect of Affect in Organizational Settings
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-234-4

Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Claire E. Ashton-James and Neal M. Ashkanasy

Although there has been increasing interest in the role of affect in work settings, the impact of moods and emotions in strategic decision making remains largely…

Abstract

Although there has been increasing interest in the role of affect in work settings, the impact of moods and emotions in strategic decision making remains largely unexplored. In this essay, we address this shortcoming by proposing a conceptual model of strategic decision making that incorporates, at its core, the impact of affective states on cognitive processes that are integral to the decision outcome. The model is based on the principles of Affective Events Theory, which holds that environmental exigencies generate “affective events” that cause emotional reactions in organizational members which, in turn, determine members’ attitudes and behaviors. We extend this model to include the effect of the extra-organizational environment, and propose that emotions “infuse” those cognitive processes that are critical to the strategic decision making process. We conclude that strategic decision making in organizations is not always a controlled, deliberate, purely cognitive process, as it is often described. Rather, we contend that the moods and emotions that managers experience in response to positive and negative workplace events have a significant affect on strategic decision-making processes and ultimately, organizational-level outcomes. We discuss the implications of our model for theory, research, and practice.

Details

Emotions, Ethics and Decision-Making
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84663-941-8

Article
Publication date: 6 September 2022

Luciana Brandão Ferreira, Janaina de Moura Engracia Giraldi, Vish Maheshwari and Jorge Henrique Caldeira de Oliveira

This paper aims to verify the brand image effects of holding a sport mega-event by investigating the host city's influence on the country's branding, as a tourist destination.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to verify the brand image effects of holding a sport mega-event by investigating the host city's influence on the country's branding, as a tourist destination.

Design/methodology/approach

This research considered the Rio 2016 Olympic Games and uses quantitative methods: exploratory factor analysis and regression. Data were collected by structured questionnaires with a sample of (n = 274) international respondents with high international travel experience.

Findings

Rio de Janeiro's 2016 host city image positively predicted Brazil's tourist destination image. Both cognitive and affective image dimensions of Rio as a host city predicted Brazil's destination image, but the cognitive image dimensions demonstrated more impact.

Practical implications

Even in a mega-event context, city marketing strategies should be planned and executed with a focus on the country's destination image.

Originality/value

The study contributes by focusing on presenting the importance of the host city image dimensions to the host country destination image in a sports mega-event context. The study investigated a new approach, the impacts of affective and cognitive dimensions in the overall destination image considering two connected destinations and the hosting of a sport mega-event, a condition not found in the literature thus far.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 7 June 2016

Annilee M. Game, Michael A. West and Geoff Thomas

To explore the roles of perceived leader caregiving, and followers’ leader-specific attachment orientations, in followers’ experiences of negative interactions and emotions.

Abstract

Purpose

To explore the roles of perceived leader caregiving, and followers’ leader-specific attachment orientations, in followers’ experiences of negative interactions and emotions.

Methodology/approach

In a qualitative field study, individuals identified as secure and insecure (avoidant or anxious) on a pre-measure of leader-specific attachment, were interviewed regarding perceptions of leader caregiving and experiences of negative affective events in their current leadership dyad.

Findings

Followers perceived and interpreted negative interpersonal events and emotions in ways that reflected underlying attachment concerns, and embedded perceptions, of leader caregiving quality.

Research limitations/implications

The study was small-scale but provides rich relational information on which future researchers can build to further explore the development and impact of leader-follower attachment dynamics.

Practical implications

Attachment-focused leadership development training may be useful in enhancing leader-follower relationship quality.

Originality/value

This study is the first to demonstrate qualitatively the associations between followers’ leader-specific attachment orientations, their perceptions of leader caregiving, and their experiences of negative affective events in the leader-follower dyad.

Details

Emotions and Organizational Governance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-998-5

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Petra Kipfelsberger, Dennis Herhausen and Heike Bruch

The purpose of this paper is to explore how and when customers influence organizational climate and organizational health through their feedback. Based on affective events

2008

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how and when customers influence organizational climate and organizational health through their feedback. Based on affective events theory, the authors classify both positive and negative customer feedback (PCF and NCF) as affective work events. The authors expect that these events influence the positive affective climate of an organization and ultimately organizational health, and that the relationships are moderated by empowerment climate.

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equation modeling was utilized to analyze survey data obtained from a sample of 178 board members, 80 HR representatives, and 10,953 employees from 80 independent organizations.

Findings

The findings support the expected indirect effects. Furthermore, empowerment climate strengthened the impact of PCF on organizational health but does not affect the relationship between NCF and organizational health.

Research limitations/implications

The cross-sectional design is a potential limitation of the study.

Practical implications

Managers should be aware that customer feedback influences an organization’s emotional climate and organizational health. Based on the results organizations might actively disseminate PCF and establish an empowerment climate. With regard to NCF, managers might consider the potential affective and health-related consequences for employees and organizations.

Social implications

Customers are able to contribute to an organization’s positive affective climate and to organizational health if they provide positive feedback to organizations.

Originality/value

By providing first insights into the consequences of both PCF and NCF on organizational health, this study opens a new avenue for scientific inquiry of customer influences on employees at the organizational level.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Majid Ghasemy, Ali Derahvasht and Julen Castillo Apraiz

This study, drawing upon affective events theory (AET), examines the relationships between work environment features, work events, affective states and attitudes in the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study, drawing upon affective events theory (AET), examines the relationships between work environment features, work events, affective states and attitudes in the Malaysian academic environment. Specifically, the authors examine the impact of supervisory support and welfare on role conflict, the impact of role conflict on affective states and the impact of affective states on job satisfaction using data collected from the international faculty.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected data from 152 respondents through an online platform, and given this study's causal predictive-explanatory nature, the authors apply partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) for data analysis. In addition, the authors complement their analysis by examining the nonlinear effects within the model as a robustness check.

Findings

From an explanatory perspective, the authors find support for all the hypotheses, implying the applicability of AET in academic contexts. Regarding the predictive perspective, the authors’ model exhibits a high out-of-sample predictive power. Importantly, the robustness check provides additional support for their model.

Practical implications

Given that the international faculty comes from different countries, the authors’ findings suggest that university managers should formulate and implement policies, which encourage and celebrate cultural diversity to increase the international faculty's job satisfaction. Additionally, policies that improve the process of job designs and descriptions need amendments in a way that reduces the role conflict faced by the multicultural faculty which, in turn, leads to negative affect and ultimately to job dissatisfaction.

Originality/value

This article is one of the first research studies focusing on the verification of AET in the context of international higher education. The authors apply the recent evaluative guidelines for a solid and rigorous PLS-SEM analysis and prove that the wandering scholars' emotions matter in achieving desirable organizational outcomes in cross-cultural institutions of higher learning.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

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