Search results

1 – 10 of over 9000
To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Maturing Leadership: How Adult Development Impacts Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-402-7

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 January 2021

Suzanne R. Hawley

The COVID-19 pandemic has uncovered public health vulnerabilities worldwide, particularly in the hard-hit USA. US public health professionals, regardless of role, may need…

Abstract

Purpose

The COVID-19 pandemic has uncovered public health vulnerabilities worldwide, particularly in the hard-hit USA. US public health professionals, regardless of role, may need to exercise leadership in both planned and unexpected situations. This model of practice outside of traditional roles, known as Public Health 3.0, requires adaptive leadership – a systems approach to making progress on complex challenges. Educational programs should improve students’ adaptive leadership competency to prepare them for the public health workforce. This paper aims to provide an educational framework for implementing adaptive leadership instruction for undergraduate students.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper used experiential and traditional instructional strategies and adaptive leadership competencies to develop a semester-length leadership course for undergraduate students in health, nursing, social science, business and education. Adaptive leadership principles were learned and practiced, preparing students for systemic challenges through the lens of Public Health 3.0. Competencies were assessed pre- and post-semester.

Findings

Of 248 students, 72% were health professions majors. Students reported pre-post scores on 29 measures of competency, interest, learning and behavioral change. Quantitative evaluations identified statistically significant improvement in all domains. Additional quantitative feedback indicated improvement on the three Kirkpatrick levels of evaluation assessed (reaction, learning and behavior).

Originality/value

Tiered evaluation methods indicated that this leadership course enhanced participants’ self-reported adaptive leadership learning and competency, as well as intention and ability to translate learning into practice. A broad spectrum of competency development is needed for students entering practice in the Public Health 3.0 era, particularly related to pandemic response.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Gabrielle Ka Wai Wong and Diana L.H. Chan

The purpose of this paper is to outline the core ideas of adaptive leadership and relates them to challenges confronting academic libraries.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline the core ideas of adaptive leadership and relates them to challenges confronting academic libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides an overview of the adaptive leadership model and highlights the key concepts. Recent initiatives at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology Library are used as cases to illustrate how the model may guide the authors’ focus to finding leverage points.

Findings

Using the model, the key role of positional leaders shifts from the traditional sense of giving direction and protection to followers, to one that orchestrates the change process with the team through difficulties and uncertainties, and to build culture and structure that facilitate adaptive changes.

Practical implications

Academic librarians can use the concepts and framework of adaptive leadership to design change strategies and manage change processes.

Originality/value

This is the first paper introducing the adaptive leadership model to academic libraries.

Details

Library Management, vol. 39 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 June 2007

Linda M. Randall and Lori A. Coakley

To propose Heifetz's adaptive leadership model as the primary process for initiating change in today's more business‐oriented academic environment in which colleges and…

Abstract

Purpose

To propose Heifetz's adaptive leadership model as the primary process for initiating change in today's more business‐oriented academic environment in which colleges and universities are required to compete to attract students and are facing greater scrutiny and accountability from outside constituencies.

Design/methodology/approach

Two case studies are presented that underscore some of the challenges facing today's academic institutions. Heiftez's adaptive leadership model is applied to each case.

Findings

Leadership is more than an individual acting in a position. It is a process in which change initiatives must emanate from key stakeholders, all of whom are engaged in that process. The two cases presented in the paper serve to illustrate the greater potential for successful change initiatives offered by the adaptive leadership model.

Research limitations/implications

The research examines two specific case studies in which adaptive leadership dimensions are used to examine the success or failure of a change initiative. The study needs to be expanded to other situations to more fully explore the merits of this model. Other case studies are being examined.

Practical implications

The leadership model applied in this study can be used in any organization, academic or non‐academic, which is confronting change initiatives that require both immediate action and commitment from myriad stakeholders.

Originality/value

To date, no other studies have employed adaptive leadership as a process to address the demands of the more business‐oriented, academic environment.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 22 February 2020

Andy Coleman

This article utilizes the concept of adaptive leadership to explore how Leicester City, a small, provincial football club, defied odds of 5000-1 to became only the sixth…

Abstract

Purpose

This article utilizes the concept of adaptive leadership to explore how Leicester City, a small, provincial football club, defied odds of 5000-1 to became only the sixth winners of the English Premier League. It examines two research questions: 1. can adaptive leadership be used to explain how the club developed the conditions for the team’s success? and; 2. what practical lessons can be learned from this?

Design/methodology/approach

This case study utilizes secondary material, published from 2011-2019, including interviews with players and staff, recordings of press conferences, club announcements, match programmes, books, magazine and newspaper articles, television reports, and social media coverage.

Findings

Adaptive leadership provides a mechanism for understanding the organizational change necessary for Leicester City’s title victory. Three core elements of adaptive leadership are identified: 1. the “change leader’s” deliberate decision to engage others across the organization in a process of “intelligent reflection,” to identify the required approach to address an identified organizational objective; 2. an organization-wide focus on building leadership capacity, to promote continuous improvement through personal and organizational learning; 3. a long term commitment by the most senior organizational leader to elements of the change process, thereby ensuring new ways of working became normalized over the longer term.

Originality/value

While theoretically well-developed, the practice of adaptive leadership remains under-researched (Yukl and Mahsud, 2010). Leicester City’s Premier League victory illustrates several key aspects of adaptive leadership in action, in a way that many people can easily relate to. The efficacious and team learning aspects of Leicester City’s success story are important for organizational development scholars and practitioners alike. In summary, the key findings and lessons within this article can be metaphorically transferred to other team-based learning organization, i.e. including and beyond the world of sport!.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 21 September 2020

John H. Humphreys, Milorad M. Novicevic, Stephanie S. Pane Haden and Md. Kamrul Hasan

Uhl-Bien and Arena (2018) presented a persuasive argument for recognizing the concept of enabling leadership as a critical form of leadership for adaptive organizations…

Abstract

Purpose

Uhl-Bien and Arena (2018) presented a persuasive argument for recognizing the concept of enabling leadership as a critical form of leadership for adaptive organizations. This study aims to narratively explore the concept of enabling leadership in the context of social complexity.

Design/methodology/approach

To explore how leaders enable adaptive processes, Uhl-Bien and Arena (2018) called for future research using in-depth case studies of social actors centered on emergence in complex environments. In this in-depth case study, the authors pursue theory elaboration by using a form of analytically structured history process to analyze primary and secondary sources.

Findings

During archival research of Whitney Young, Jr’s largely overlooked and misunderstood leadership in the historic social drama of the 1960s US civil rights movement, the authors discovered compelling evidence to support and extend the theoretical arguments advanced by Uhl-Bien and Arena (2018).

Research limitations/implications

The reflexivity associated with interpretive case approaches confronts the issue of subjectivism. The authors ask readers to judge the credibility of their arguments accordingly.

Originality/value

Using a relational leadership-as-practice lens, the authors interpret the dramaturgical performance Whitney Young, Jr directed to facilitate coherent emancipatory dialogue, affect the social construction of power relations and enable the adaptive space needed for social transformation to emerge.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 November 2018

Sonia D. Gatchair

The purpose of this paper is to assess the utility of complex adaptive leadership to public financial management reforms in Jamaica and provide insights to advance…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the utility of complex adaptive leadership to public financial management reforms in Jamaica and provide insights to advance theoretical perspectives on leadership in public organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is qualitative and adopts a case study approach with data collected using document analyses and interviews.

Findings

The study highlights that leaders need to both drive and respond to directional forces and environmental pressures, which require them to balance or oscillate between leader and follower roles, and even demonstrate both simultaneously in order to achieve change successfully.

Practical implications

In developing states faced with technical and adaptive challenges, the inputs of followers assume greater importance as they are integral to innovation and flexibility needed for problem solving. Communication, negotiation, bargaining and teamwork are critical skills that must be included in the repertoire of leadership and followership training.

Originality/value

The study connects leadership to pubic finance, fiscal decision-making, and reforms to public fiscal systems in a small developing state, Jamaica. The paper highlights that increased attention to the context is necessary, especially in participatory democracies, which demand responsiveness to powerful or influential interests, reduce autonomy and give rise to unclear organizational boundaries and hierarchies. It establishes a nexus between adaptive leadership and social identity theories, which demonstrate the emergence, contribution, and importance of group identities to distributed leadership. The roles of leadership and followership can interchange, which increases the fluidity and dynamism of the leadership process.

Details

International Journal of Public Leadership, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4929

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Timothy Steffensmeier, Julia Fabris McBride and Peter Dove

The purpose of this paper is to understand the impact of the DeBoer fellowship, a citizen leadership development program in Myanmar. The challenge in Myanmar of catalyzing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the impact of the DeBoer fellowship, a citizen leadership development program in Myanmar. The challenge in Myanmar of catalyzing transformative change facing government and civil society cannot be overstated. Autocratic, centralized, and a traits-based approach to leadership has been, until recently, the primary way to assess leaders in Myanmar. In this dynamic civic context, new ways of leading and learning are needed.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews of DeBoer fellowship alumni were analyzed using a single case study method. The project focuses on individual participants of the program as the primary unit of analysis. In addition, direct observation and contributions from DeBoer fellowship administration and faculty were used to describe this case study.

Findings

The DeBoer fellows understood their challenge as one of energize others, a concept of adaptive leadership. Moreover, individuals experienced deep degrees of transformational development. Civic agency was the least noticable concept that was studied.

Research limitations/implications

Future research could more explicitly measure and examine the degree to which civic agency is being nurtured in leadership development programs.

Practical implications

Civic leadership curriculum designers should be more conscious of adult development theory when choosing programming objectives and activities.

Social implications

Leadership development initatives in more authoritative systems can be effective developmental experiences for participants who are motivated to improve their organizations and communities.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first effort to analyze a citizen leadership program in Myanmar.

Details

International Journal of Public Leadership, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4929

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2018

Girma Shimelis Muluneh and Matebe Tafere Gedifew

Universities are making changes to fulfill their education, research and community service responsibilities. However, the effectiveness of change initiatives is always in…

Abstract

Purpose

Universities are making changes to fulfill their education, research and community service responsibilities. However, the effectiveness of change initiatives is always in questions because changes especially in developing nations are carried out under multidimensional pressures. Exacerbated by limited experience of systemic change management approaches, most change initiatives fail to address institutional problems. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to propose adaptive design as a promising approach to create adaptive changes in universities. Guided by pragmatic philosophical viewpoint, this research followed a practice theory to understand actions and decisions related to changes. Staffs and students were made to reflect their perception for the principles and tactics extracted from adaptive design and their implementation in the university. In addition, the study tried to identify major challenges to create adaptive changes. In doing so, the research used mixed method–sequential explanatory approach. Survey and interviews were made to gather relevant data. The finding of this research confirm that adaptive design is an excellent alternative approach to create adaptive changes in universities. This may prove the significance of the approach if accepted and scaled up as an alternative change management theory. However, in the target university, leaders and change agents rarely used a change management approach that resembles adaptive design, which in turn may be the reason for failing to bring adaptive changes (deep and pervasive). Consequently, it was reflected that business as usual do not suffice, and hence, universities have to continually update themselves with up-to-date change management approaches like adaptive design. Besides, it was outlined that institutions should revisit why and how they are introducing changes.

Design/methodology/approach

The study followed mixed research–sequential explanatory approach. Multistage stratified random sampling was used to select respondents which included staffs and students. Questionnaire for 219 respondents and in-depth interviews with purposely selected six relevant interviewees were employed. One sample t-test, ANOVA and content analysis techniques were used to analyze data.

Findings

The finding of this paper reflected that tenets of adaptive design, its principles and tactics are important tools to lead and institutionalize change initiatives. This may prove the significance of the approach if accepted and scaled up as an alternative change management theory. However, in the target university, leaders and change agents rarely used a change management approach that resembles adaptive design, which, in turn, may be the reason for failing to bring adaptive changes (deep and pervasive) in the institution. Consequently, it was reflected that business as usual does not suffice, and hence, universities have to continually update themselves with up-to-date change management approaches like adaptive design. Besides, it was outlined that institutions should revisit why and how they are introducing changes.

Research limitations/implications

The basic limitation of this study is the problem of supporting literature evidence from other similar research findings, since the authors hardly find similar research outputs. Besides, this research might probably have a problem of transferability to other organizations, because the samples of this study were too limited given the huge number of staffs, which may not represent the whole population besides the interview was made only with volunteers. Moreover, it was conducted only in universities. For this reason, care must be taken to deduce any of the results to other population.

Practical implications

The research reflected that the university has to work to build change adaptive culture. In doing so, developing deep investigation and open discussions of challenges are necessary to understand adaptive problems. Besides, the university has to try to use adaptive design as an alternative change management tool, collaborative thinking for creative solutions, using group change strategies, and creating clear communication systems on the types and impacts of changes (meaning making), as well as acquainting staffs with the necessary skills to do adaptive works are among the practical implications forwarded as recommendations.

Social implications

This research has reflected on the change management approaches of higher education institutions. The social value of universities are determined by their contribution as a result of efforts made to upgrade themselves via various reform initiatives. To enhance the reform/change process, universities are investing huge resources to adopt and implement innovative approaches. However, the change efforts need to be guided by a systemic approach and by introducing adaptive design might contribute a lot for universities to enhance their social contribution. Lessons from adaptive design have implications to overcome challenges associated with human elements like resistance, collaboration, owning and implementing changes, etc.

Originality/value

This research is originally conducted extracting valuable lessons from adaptive design introduced by Bernstein and Linsky (2016). This investigation has tried to study adaptive design in one of the universities in a developing nation with a major purpose of supporting or refuting the approach. This study tried to capture staffs’ perception for adaptive design approach. Besides, an attempt was made to find out systems that resemble adaptive design in the university’s change management process. Moreover, the common challenges to create adaptive changes were traced. Studying the case in the university and common challenges helped to recommend the need of adaptive design confidently.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Anthony Olalere

– The purpose of this paper is to evaluate a leadership crisis in Africa with the view to suggested new model that help overcome the leadership gap.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate a leadership crisis in Africa with the view to suggested new model that help overcome the leadership gap.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopt the complexity leadership approach to explicate the leadership crisis in Africa.

Findings

This paper suggested that the use of complexity leadership model of enabling leadership to better understand the complex leadership crisis.

Research limitations/implications

The application of the leadership enables an appreciation of contemporary leadership realities.

Originality/value

This paper adopting complexity leadership is novel and helps to fill the gap in understanding of present leadership crisis.

Details

International Journal of Public Leadership, vol. 11 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4929

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 9000