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Abstract

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How to Deliver Integrated Care
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-530-1

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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2021

Cicilia Larasati Rembulan and Astrid Kusumowidagdo

The purpose of this study is to investigate problems that emerged in indigenous community-based tourism during the COVID-19 pandemic, to identify the actors involved and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate problems that emerged in indigenous community-based tourism during the COVID-19 pandemic, to identify the actors involved and to identify values that were exchanged between actors during the pandemic. This research is crucial given the limited studies around indigenous community-based tourism during the pandemic, especially within the perspectives of value exchange theory.

Design/methodology/approach

This research used a constructionist paradigm with a qualitative case study design. Data collection included interviews with six participants, virtual observation, an open-ended questionnaire to 22 community members and 20 tourists, analysis of a book written by Sade’s customary chief and social media artifacts. This study was conducted during the COVID-19 pandemic, where physical distancing measures were applied, therefore most data were collected remotely. Purposive sampling was used and research credibility was increased through detailed note taking, data sources triangulation and member checking. Data analysis was conducted with a coding process, which involved continuous iterations.

Findings

Problems identified were decreased revenue and power disadvantage suffered by indigenous community-based tourism. The actors involved in value exchanges varied, including value supporter (i.e. government, private sector such as television, university), value creator (i.e. tourist) or secondary value provider (i.e. travel agent). Values emerged in the interaction between actors in the network. Changes in value exchanges were in terms of value types, relationship intensity between actors and ways of doing the exchange. Non-human factor (i.e. non-actor) was also involved.

Research limitations/implications

Due to restrictive circumstances (i.e. COVID-19 pandemic), the data collection procedure was limited to online communications and letter correspondence. Therefore, opportunities to capture the full phenomenon might be missed as the researchers could not physically meet with the participant.

Practical implications

It was possible for value exchange to alter due to situational factors, including a pandemic. Business diversification is needed by indigenous community-based tourism to achieve a power advantage. Values were found in the relationship between actors, hence, meeting channels or dialogue with other actors could be optimized.

Originality/value

The context of this study, which was indigenous community-based tourism during a pandemic contributed to the study’s originality. Research in this context, which used a clear theoretical framework such as value exchange theory, is scarce. Thus, opportunities for transferability are broad.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2021

Clement Nangpiire, Joaquim Silva and Helena Alves

The customer as an active and engaged value co-creator raises new challenges for theory and practice, especially in the hospitality industry. However, the connection…

Abstract

Purpose

The customer as an active and engaged value co-creator raises new challenges for theory and practice, especially in the hospitality industry. However, the connection between engagement and co-creation is little studied in the hotel/tourism literature. This paper proposes a connection between customer engagement (CE) and value co-creation frameworks to ascertain and depict the internal actors' activities and factors that foster or hinder guests' co-creation and destruction of value.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers used qualitative methods (35 in-depth interviews, document analysis and four observation sessions) in seven regions of Ghana to explore the customer's perspective. Data were analyzed with NVivo11 within a thematic analysis framework.

Findings

The findings suggest that positive and negative engagement fosters or hinders guests' interactions, which lead to value co-creation or destruction. The research also discovered that negative interactions occasioned by any factor or actor trigger value destruction at multiple stages of the experience journey.

Practical implications

Industry players can use the framework developed to assess their businesses, explore and reflect on the proposed value they aim to generate, and thus be more aware of how they can better facilitate value co-creation with their consumers and avoid value destruction.

Originality/value

This research proposes a novel connection between customer interactions, engagement and value co-creation to ascertain and depict the internal actors' activities and factors that foster or hinder customers' experience in the hotel/tourism industry.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

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Article
Publication date: 18 June 2021

Priya Sharma, Qiyuan Li and Susan M. Land

The growth of online social network sites and their conceptualization as affinity spaces makes them well suited for exploring how individuals share knowledge and practices…

Abstract

Purpose

The growth of online social network sites and their conceptualization as affinity spaces makes them well suited for exploring how individuals share knowledge and practices around specific interests or affinities. The purpose of this study is to extend what is known about highly active/key actors in online affinity spaces, especially the ways in which they sustain and contribute to knowledge sharing.

Design/methodology/approach

This study analyzed 514 discussion posts gathered from an online affinity space on disease management. This study used a variety of methods to answer the research questions: the authors used discourse analyses to examine the conversations in the online affinity space, social network analyses to identify the structure of participation in the space and association rule mining and sentiment analysis to identify co-occurrence of discourse codes and sentiment of the discussions.

Findings

The results indicate that the quality and type of discourse varies considerably between key and other actors. Key actors’ discourse in the network serves to elaborate on and explain ideas and concepts, whereas other actors provide a more supportive role and engage primarily in storytelling.

Originality/value

This work extends what is known about informal mentoring and the role of key actors within affinity spaces by identifying specific discourse types and types of knowledge sharing that are characteristic of key actors. Also, this study provides an example of the use of a combination of rule mining association and sentiment analysis to characterize the nature of the affinity space.

Details

Information and Learning Sciences, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2021

Pilar Gardiazabal and Constanza Bianchi

This paper aims to analyze the well-being consequences of value co-creation activities at an ecosystem level, focusing specifically on the micro and meso levels. This…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyze the well-being consequences of value co-creation activities at an ecosystem level, focusing specifically on the micro and meso levels. This study is performed in a retail ecosystem, a highly relevant context where individuals spend a considerable amount of time and resources, but where well-being is usually not deemed as a relevant outcome.

Design/methodology/approach

The investigation analyzes qualitative data from micro and meso level actors of a retail ecosystem. At the micro-level, in-depth interviews performed with customers, employees and suppliers were assessed. The meso level analysis included most of the actors embedded in the retail ecosystem: employees’ headquarters, suppliers’ headquarters, nearby competitors, family, other retail outlets and external employees.

Findings

This study is one of the first in the transformative service research area to analyze well-being from a retail ecosystem perspective. Hence, this analysis broadens the literature on transformative service by considering supermarket retailing, an everyday service context that is not assumed to generate well-being outcomes. Results reveal that actors who spend more time or have fewer options available for them in the retail ecosystem see their well-being deeply affected. It also extends the conceptualization of value co-creation to a retail ecosystem, a specific ecosystem, which differs from previous studies that focus mostly on health-care ecosystems.

Research limitations/implications

Although useful to understand new insights, a limitation of this investigation is that it is based upon a single qualitative study.

Practical implications

The study portrays how activities happening within a business context have consequences beyond traditional measures such as loyalty or turn-over. It proposes specific value co-creation actions to be performed by employees, suppliers and customers to promote positive well-being consequences for the micro and meso level retail ecosystem.

Social implications

Retail ecosystems are usually not deemed as relevant when trying to understand societal well-being outcomes. This study empirically depicts that all services, even the ones without transformative goals, need to be aware of the impact they have on societal well-being.

Originality/value

This paper provides a novel conceptualization of well-being effects in a retail ecosystem. Specifically, this is the first study in the transformative service research literature to identify the micro and meso level well-being consequences of value co-creation activities within a retail ecosystem.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 June 2021

Diego Alex Gazaro dos Santos, Aurora Zen and Bruno Anicet Bittencourt

Innovation ecosystems can emerge and grow organically, but the process can also be managed through conscious intervention. Therefore, this study observes different…

Abstract

Purpose

Innovation ecosystems can emerge and grow organically, but the process can also be managed through conscious intervention. Therefore, this study observes different motivations and expectations for each group of actors. The lack of alignment between actors could have a negative influence on the development of innovation ecosystems. This study aims to analyze the coordination strategies of the actors throughout the life cycle of innovation ecosystems.

Design/methodology/approach

This study develops and proposes a model for coordinating innovation ecosystems based on the theoretical backgrounds of the ecosystem life cycle and ecosystem coordination.

Findings

This study argues that each stage of an innovation ecosystem’s life cycle – inception, launching, growth and maturity – demands different coordination strategies. Initially, networks are simpler and thus the coordination issues are less difficult. However, as the ecosystem evolves and the complexity of the networks increases, a more sophisticated strategy, such as orchestration or choreography, is needed.

Research limitations/implications

This is a theoretical study that recommends further research to test this model.

Practical implications

The understanding of coordination and stages of the life cycle of an innovation ecosystem can guide actors in the design of strategies for developing of ecosystems.

Social implications

The proposed framework could support strategies to engage civil society in actions to develop innovation ecosystems.

Originality/value

This study presents a framework to understand the coordination strategies better, considering the stages of an innovation ecosystem’s life cycle.

Details

Innovation & Management Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2515-8961

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 17 May 2021

Helena Forslund, Maria Björklund and Veronica Svensson Ülgen

Sustainability approaches across product supply chains are well-known, while similar knowledge on transport supply chains (TSC) is limited. The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

Sustainability approaches across product supply chains are well-known, while similar knowledge on transport supply chains (TSC) is limited. The purpose of this paper is to explore sustainability approaches and managerial challenges in extending sustainability across a TSC.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a case study of a TSC with a shipper, a third-party logistics firm and a hauler. Each actor’s views on sustainability-related communication and relations with other TSC actors are analyzed through the lens of agency theory.

Findings

Each dyad in the TSC reveals different, more or less collaboration-based approaches. Challenges are revealed, including the lack of shipper understanding for the TSC context and the use of immature contracts, which disincentivizes sustainability compliance. The multi-tier study object reveals the silencing of distant actors and the need for actors to take on mediating roles to bridge information asymmetries.

Research limitations/implications

Combining literature perspectives (relations, communication and agency theory) provides a deeper understanding of the approaches applied and identifies different challenges. The inclusion of agency theory reveals principal problems such as information asymmetries between agents and less-informed principals and suggests complementary labels of supply chain actors.

Practical implications

Practical contributions include the highlighting of managerial challenges, which can aid managers in extending sustainability across TCSs.

Social implications

The case study method offers insights into collaboratively improving sustainability in supply chains (such as using contracts), thus having social and environmental implications.

Originality/value

The paper narrows knowledge gaps about managing sustainability among logistics service providers and analyzes data from multi-tier actors.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Philein Hafidz Al Kautsar and Nur Budi Mulyono

The purpose of this study is to develop an ecosystem-based DRR concept and explore how far the concept can be applied in a disaster-management context.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to develop an ecosystem-based DRR concept and explore how far the concept can be applied in a disaster-management context.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used the ecosystem concept established by Tsujimoto et al. (2018) as the foundation of this study. They then conducted a literature search to adapt the ecosystem concept to fit the context of disaster management. Thus, they developed an ecosystem-based DRR concept. They used a case study method to test whether the adapted ecosystem concept can be applied to examine a real-life case of disaster management. For data collection, they used qualitative methods; a semi-structured interview with practitioners and other actors involved in disaster-management practice as well as document review. For data analysis, they used thematic analysis to find themes within the data.

Findings

By using this concept, the authors found some actors fulfil their role in the ecosystem toward the DRR effort, some actors are ill-equipped, and some actors are actively working against DRR effort. There are also implementation challenges, as numerous programs are only halfway done due to a lack of resources. However, the main problems of this disaster can be summarized into three categories: technical problems, socio-economic problems and law-enforcement problems. All three problems need to be addressed altogether because even neglecting only one problem would lead to a flawed solution.

Research limitations/implications

One of the limitations is the respondents' bias. This research aims to find out their part, or more accurately what they are representative of, regarding disaster management for forest and land fire case. As some of the questions may reveal unflattering action or may even hurting their credibility, respondents might not have provided an entirely honest answer. Another limitation is the differing respondents' roles within the disaster. As each of the respondents is a representative of an actor in disaster management, they all have different traits. Thus, this situation makes it challenging to produce similar quality and quantity data for each of them.

Practical implications

As concluded, the ecosystem-based DRR concept can be used as a framework to examine a real-life case of disaster management. It can be utilized to explain roles, relationships and the whole network of disaster-management actors. The authors hope that this concept could help decision-makers in designing their policies.

Social implications

The main problems of this disaster can be summarized into three categories: technical problems, socio-economic problems and law-enforcement problems. All three problems need to be addressed altogether for even neglecting only one problem would lead to a flawed solution. However, the yearly reoccurrences of fires and the widespread of illegal and dangerous practice, slash and burn agriculture, are evidence that the government mishandles the other two problems. There is a need for reform within legal institutions and government's treatment regarding local farmers. There is a need for trust, cooperation and synergy between disaster-management actors.

Originality/value

The ecosystem concept has been used widely in the field of management of technology and innovation. However, while ecosystem concept is commonly used in the management of technology and innovation, it is rarely used in a disaster-management context.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2021

Tharusha N. Gooneratne and Zahirul Hoque

This paper aims to report on an empirical investigation of the fate of the balanced scorecard (BSC) approach in an organization.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report on an empirical investigation of the fate of the balanced scorecard (BSC) approach in an organization.

Design/methodology/approach

Building on actor-network theory and using a qualitative case study approach, this study analyses how across time certain actors attempted to build a competing network in the organization to gain support for their underlying rationales for replacing the BSC with a budgeting system. Data were collected using interviews, observations and archival data from a Sri Lankan commercial bank.

Findings

This paper finds that despite the enthusiastic journey with all its potentials to be a sustainable accounting innovation, the attraction towards the BSC innovation by the organization appeared to be temporary because the BSC knowledge claims that were advanced by its promoters had not been widely accepted by those involved in the practice. Such a consequence of innovation diffusion appeared to be the result of the failure of the innovation promoters in coordinating the heterogeneous interests of various actors involved in the practice. This study concludes that the BSC failed to be sustained, amid varying ideologies and interests of powerful actors across time and opponent actors’ perceived deficiencies in its adapted design attributes.

Research limitations/implications

Although the findings relate to a Sri Lankan case, they offer important insight into how parallel, competing networks advocating different control systems may exist in an organization, and that the sustainability of a specific system may depend upon the efforts and the relative power of the advocators of that system.

Practical implications

This paper sheds useful insights for practitioners on the effective implementation of accounting innovations and managing management control systems in organizations amid tensions associated with competing networks.

Originality/value

The outcomes enhance the knowledge of how multiple networks operating in an organization could compete with one another, with the result that one network may fall apart while another network gains prominence in the corporate landscape across time, amid varying interests of key actors, their actions and interessement devices used.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

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Article
Publication date: 6 April 2021

Sadia Soltani

This study aims to investigate business-to-business (B2B) engagement within an internet of things (IoT) ecosystem. A conceptual framework is proposed that can be used for…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate business-to-business (B2B) engagement within an internet of things (IoT) ecosystem. A conceptual framework is proposed that can be used for building engagement strategies considering key actors within an IoT ecosystem.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used an integrative literature review as a research method and investigated engagement across several disciplines along with antecedents and outcomes of engagement to form an understanding of IoT engagement.

Findings

The findings in this study revealed IoT engagement antecedents as IoT readiness, commitment, communication, involvement and support and, consequently, the outcomes of IoT engagement as trust, loyalty, better performance and satisfaction. Furthermore, IoT engagement needs to be considered from three perspectives, namely, from a multidimensional perspective, beyond a dyad perspective and from the service-dominant logic perspective, which suggests thinking of goods as services and highlights the importance of value co-creation.

Research limitations/implications

As the study of B2B engagement within the IoT ecosystem is conceptual, empirical investigations are suggested for elaborating on the findings.

Practical implications

The conceptual framework provides managers within an IoT ecosystem with thorough recommendations on why to change their perspectives toward engagement; it points out drivers of engagement that need to be maintained and adds IoT readiness as a new antecedent to engagement literature.

Originality/value

This study contributes a coherent conceptualization of actors’ engagement within IoT ecosystems and enhances both the theoretical and practical domain of B2B engagement.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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