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Book part
Publication date: 7 October 2019

Vernon J. Richardson and Yuxin Shan

The accounting profession is beginning to demand data analytics skills from its professionals to handle the increasing amount of data available to address accounting

Abstract

The accounting profession is beginning to demand data analytics skills from its professionals to handle the increasing amount of data available to address accounting questions. Indeed, the explosion of data availability and data are changing the accounting profession, providing accountants the opportunity to continue as key financial information providers to decision-makers. We conducted a survey of accounting department chairs to help understand if, when and how accounting programs would include data analytics in its curriculum. The authors find that 90.7% of accounting department chairs believe that data analytics belongs in the accounting curriculum, with 59.3% planning to introduce an accounting data analytics course in the next three to five years. Most (66.5%) prefer an accounting data analytics course as compared to the general business analytics course and more than half of respondents (56.2%) predict that their coverage of data analytics will be incorporated both throughout the regular accounting curriculum and in a standalone data analytics course. Combined with the requirement of 2018 Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business standards, the authors propose that data analytics should be incorporated both in the undergraduate level and graduate level, starting from basic analytics tools and ending with advanced emerging techniques.

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Article
Publication date: 27 January 2021

Huthaifa Al-Hazaima, Mary Low and Umesh Sharma

This paper aims to examine the perceptions of salient stakeholders in Jordan concerning the importance of integrating sustainability education (SE) into the accounting curriculum.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the perceptions of salient stakeholders in Jordan concerning the importance of integrating sustainability education (SE) into the accounting curriculum.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses salient stakeholder theory as a lens and seeks to explore the possible integration of SE into the Jordanian tertiary accounting curriculum. A final sample of 702 salient stakeholders including university accounting educators, accounting students, industry accountants, government representatives and accounting association professional members were used to glean an insight of their views and the extent to which sustainability is present in accounting education.

Findings

Findings indicate that there is a strong belief by these salient stakeholders that there is significant importance for the integration of SE into the accounting curriculum in Jordanian universities. There is concern that the current curriculum does not meet the educational needs of future accountants and business executives from a sustainability perspective.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to the research debate on the competencies crisis in accounting education by focusing on the lack of SE in the accounting curriculum. This study draws attention to the need of up-skilling and applied knowledge in this critical area. There are strong viewpoints from the salient stakeholders in this study. They emphasise that a progressive education solution is required and which integrates SE into the accounting curriculum.

Practical implications

The research is useful to accounting educators, professional accounting associations, industry, accounting students and the government. The salient stakeholders in Jordan wish to include SE within the accounting curriculum. This would lead to future accountants and business executives having stronger competencies to respond in a resilient and resourceful manner to changes in the way business is conducted, especially in an area where societal and environmental impacts are highly scrutinised.

Originality/value

This study provides evidence on how salient stakeholders of an emerging economy can influence, provide guidance and leadership in integrating SE in the accounting curriculum. Engaging actively and extensively with research studies such as this allows them to voice their opinions about the importance of sustainability and how their country can better engage in this increasingly important field.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-372X

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Book part
Publication date: 12 August 2009

Jacqueline J. Schmidt, Brian Patrick Green and Roland Madison

Employers state that their major concern with accounting graduates is their inadequate skills in reading, writing, speaking, and listening (Kranacher, 2007, p. 80). Yet…

Abstract

Employers state that their major concern with accounting graduates is their inadequate skills in reading, writing, speaking, and listening (Kranacher, 2007, p. 80). Yet, the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA) and some state boards of accountancy have minimized the importance of these skills on professional certification exams. This conflict creates a mixed message. The purpose of our study is to determine accounting department chairs’ perceptions of the importance of writing, speaking, listening, interpersonal, and technological communication skills for both the accounting and the business curricula and where in the curriculum these skills are taught. In our study, we surveyed 122 accounting administrators from the largest North American accountancy programs. Survey respondents report that most required communication courses are in the general business curriculum and, to a lesser extent, as a required course in the accounting major. Consistent across demographics, respondents also indicate that all communication skills are important, but writing skills followed by technological skills are the most valued for the accounting curriculum, while writing and speaking skills are most important in the business curriculum. Implications for the curriculum are discussed.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-882-3

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Book part
Publication date: 20 May 2011

Satoshi Sugahara and Gregory Boland

This study examines the perceptions of accounting faculties toward ethics education, the extent of ethics coverage and reasons why ethics should (or should not) be taught…

Abstract

This study examines the perceptions of accounting faculties toward ethics education, the extent of ethics coverage and reasons why ethics should (or should not) be taught in Japanese tertiary schools. Data for this research was collected from faculties that primarily teach accounting in Japanese tertiary schools in 2009. The results indicate that over 90% of accounting faculties believe that ethics should be taught within the accounting curriculum. In terms of how ethics should be delivered survey participants believed in a more holistic approach, which would encompass the benefits of teaching it as both a stand-alone course and integrating it with other relevant courses. This outcome is in direct contrast to the results obtained from previous studies undertaken outside of Japan. Of particular interest was the fact that the current survey revealed that only 55.2% of respondents actually intend to incorporate ethics into their accounting courses in the foreseeable future. This research successfully adds value to the shortage of literature existing on the perceptions of ethics education among Japanese accounting faculties.

Details

Research on Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-005-6

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 18 December 2004

Zabihollah Rezaee, D. Larry Crumbley and Robert C. Elmore

Abstract

Details

Advances in Accounting Education Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-868-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

P.L. Joshi and H. Al‐Bastaki

This study examines the perceptions of 41 corporate chief accountants from Bahrain on the issues relating to the relative importance of international accounting topics in…

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Abstract

This study examines the perceptions of 41 corporate chief accountants from Bahrain on the issues relating to the relative importance of international accounting topics in Bahrain. The study indicates a significant interest of the respondents in internationalizing the accounting curriculum. The topics which received importance rating of over 80% were: foreign investment and decision making, international accounting standards, financial reporting and disclosure, foreign currency transactions and translation, management information system (MIS) for multinational enterprises (MNEs), and consolidations. Results were also compared to a recent study from United States (US) and significant differences were found to exist in respect of several topics. The reasons for the major differences in the perceptions are explained in this paper, some of which may be attributed to cultural as well as environmental differences. The study also found that there is a strong support for adoption of the International Accounting Standards (IASs) because international markets are becoming increasingly important and there exists major differences in accounting principles among the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries themselves. Furthermore, the study also suggests that in view of the similarity in social, economic, and business practices in GCC countries, the highly ranked accounting topics reported in this study should perhaps be incorporated by the accounting departments of universities operating in the GCC region. This will facilitate the process of harmonization of the accounting curriculum in this region.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1022-2529

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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2019

Taryn Miller

The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the recent reduction in the volume and complexity of the financial accounting curriculum, which is examinable as part…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the recent reduction in the volume and complexity of the financial accounting curriculum, which is examinable as part of the qualification process of chartered accountants in South Africa, has resulted in improvements in students’ understanding of core accounting concepts. The reasons for the curriculum reduction are to encourage life-long learning, reduce syllabus overload and focus on core principles.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 514 students completed an assessment designed to test core concepts. Approximately half the students had been exposed to the previous, larger and more complex curriculum; the other half had only been exposed to the reduced, simpler ‘core’ curriculum.

Findings

Although the assessment results of the two cohorts were not significantly different, the latter cohort made significantly less conceptual errors than the former cohort, even though the latter cohort was relatively novice. This finding supports the hypothesis that the reduced curriculum assists students’ understanding of core concepts. Furthermore, it aligns with Cognitive Load Theory (CLT) in that the reduction in examinable content reduces intrinsic load within cognitive load, thereby optimising student learning, as measured by assessment results and error rates.

Originality/value

The findings of this study have relevance for professional accounting bodies responsible for approving curriculum; accounting and other academics interested in the consequences of curriculum reduction on student learning and researchers applying CLT across other disciplines, specifically focussed on the relationship between intrinsic load and learning efficiency.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-372X

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Article
Publication date: 27 July 2018

Langton Mburayi and Tony Wall

Whereas the integration of sustainability into business schools has received increasing attention in recent years, the debate continues to be generic rather than…

Abstract

Purpose

Whereas the integration of sustainability into business schools has received increasing attention in recent years, the debate continues to be generic rather than recognising the peculiarities of the more quantitative sub disciplines such as accounting and finance which may of course be intimately linked to professional standards. The purpose of this paper, therefore, is to examine the extent to which sustainability is integrated into accounting and finance curricula in business schools, how, and to understand some of the challenges of doing so.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents the findings from a systematic form of literature review which draws on the previous literature about how sustainability is embedded into business school curricula and the challenges in doing so. A particular focus is placed on how the ways in which sustainability is integrated into accounting and finance curricula in business schools.

Findings

The paper demonstrates that accounting and finance lags behind other management disciplines in embedding sustainability and that institutional commitment is oftentimes a strong imperative for effective integration of sustainability.

Practical implications

This paper is a call to practitioners and researchers alike to explore new ways of integrating sustainability in the accounting and finance curricula, including working across boundaries to provide learning opportunities for future accountants, financial managers and generalist managers.

Originality/value

The paper offers an original analysis and synthesis of the literature in the context of the accounting and finance curricula in business schools, and proposed a conceptual framework to further develop sustainability education in the context of business schools.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2021

Tawei Wang

In this commentary, the author uses the development of data analytics curriculum at DePaul University as an example to highlight possible challenges and share the…

Abstract

Purpose

In this commentary, the author uses the development of data analytics curriculum at DePaul University as an example to highlight possible challenges and share the experience. In addition, seven different possible future research directions are identified so the readers are able to understand more about the impact of emerging technologies on the accounting profession and accounting curriculum.

Findings

Challenges and experience when developing data analytics curriculum at DePaul University are discussed. In addition, seven different possible future research directions are identified so the readers are able to understand more about the impact of emerging technologies on the accounting profession and accounting curriculum.

Originality/value

This paper expresses the author’s viewpoints regarding the impact of emerging technologies on accounting curriculum and the accounting profession.

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

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Book part
Publication date: 9 August 2012

Zabihollah Rezaee, Joseph Szendi, Robert E. Elmore and Ran Zhang

This study examines corporate governance and ethics (CGE) education by conducting a survey of academicians and practitioners in the United States. Results indicate that…

Abstract

This study examines corporate governance and ethics (CGE) education by conducting a survey of academicians and practitioners in the United States. Results indicate that the demand for, and interest in, CGE continues to increase. More universities are planning to provide CGE education and many CGE topics are considered important for integration into the curriculum, although the degree of importance varies between academicians and practitioners. The two prevailing methods of CGE education integration are offering a stand-alone course in CGE or infusion of CGE topics into accounting courses. Results pertaining to the importance, delivery, and topical content of CGE education may be useful to universities that are, or are considering, integrating CGE into their curricula or redesigning their CGE courses. The CGE educational issues addressed in this study should help business schools design curricula to prepare students for the challenges awaiting them in the area of CGE.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-757-4

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