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Article
Publication date: 3 November 2014

P.C. Okafor and E.A. Apebende

This paper aims to evaluate the inhibitive action of the corrosion of mild steel in sulphuric acid solutions by ethanol extracts of Thymus vulgaris (TYV), Xylopia

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to evaluate the inhibitive action of the corrosion of mild steel in sulphuric acid solutions by ethanol extracts of Thymus vulgaris (TYV), Xylopia aethiopica (XYA) and Zingiber officinale (ZGO) as eco-friendly and non-toxic mild-steel corrosion inhibitors in H2SO4 solutions.

Design/methodology/approach

Ethanol extracts of TYV leaves, XYA fruits and ZGO roots were used as inhibitors in various corrosion tests. Gravimetric and gasometric techniques were used to characterize the mechanism of inhibition.

Findings

Results indicate that the extracts inhibit the corrosion process efficiently. Inhibition efficiency was found to increase with an increase in extract concentration and decrease with an increase in temperature. Inhibition efficiencies followed the trend TYV > ZGO > XYA. Thermodynamic considerations revealed that the energy of activation increased in the presence of the plant extracts. Adsorption of the plant extracts on mild steel surface occurred spontaneously, and Ea and ΔGads values confirm a physical adsorption processes. Phytochemical studies showed the presence of saponoids, flavonoids and polyphenols whose attachment to adsorption sites on the metal surface is responsible for the inhibition process. Experimental data fit the Langmuir adsorption isotherm.

Practical implications

The plant extracts can be used in chemical cleaning and picking processes.

Originality/value

The research provides information on the possible use of the ethanol extracts from TYV leaves, XYA fruits and ZGO roots as sources of cheap, eco-friendly and non-toxic corrosion inhibitors.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 43 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Dawa Dolma Bhutia, Yeka Zhimo, Ramen Kole and Jayanta Saha

The purpose of this paper was to determine the antifungal activities of different solvent extracts of common plants in vitro and in vivo against banana anthracnose fungus…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to determine the antifungal activities of different solvent extracts of common plants in vitro and in vivo against banana anthracnose fungus Colletotrichum musae (Berk & M.A. Curtis) Arx, and to investigate its effects on the pathogen and identify the bio active component(s).

Design/methodology/approach

Extracts were obtained from leaves, tender shoots, rhizomes, bulbs, seeds and fruits of 42 naturally growing plant species following hot sequential extraction. Preliminary screening of the solvent extracts was done based on the inhibition of radial mycelial growth of C. musae following poison food technique and conidial germination inhibition by cavity slide technique. The selected extracts were assessed for their effect on harvested banana in reducing anthracnose during storage. The active components in the bio-active fractions of plant extract were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy.

Findings

Methanol extracted a larger quantity of material (between 6.9 and 12.5 per cent) than hexane or chloroform, and all its extracts were active against the test pathogen with mycelial growth inhibition ranging from 13.70 to 88.89 per cent. Zingiber officinale rhizome extract as well as Polyalthia longifolia and Clerodendrum inerme leaf extracts exhibited more than 80 per cent inhibition of mycelial growth. Total inhibition of spore germination of C. musae was recorded in Z. officinale and P. longifolia extracts at 0.3 per cent w/v and 0.5 per cent w/v concentration, respectively, while only 68 per cent spore inhibition was recorded in C. inerme at 0.5 per cent w/v concentration. Of the three plant species, Z. officinale had the best antifungal activity (18.0 per cent disease incidence; 2.2 disease severity scale) when banana fruits were dipped in the extract at a concentration of 0.5 per cent w/v at 5 days of storage in ambient condition (80-82 per cent R.H., 27 ± 1°C). The bio-active compounds in the extract of Z. officinale were identified as alpha-curcumene and zingerone.

Originality/value

Based on the antifungal activity, plant extract of Z. officinale can be used as an effective alternative to chemicals in controlling anthracnose pathogen in harvested banana.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 46 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2021

Saira Tanweer, Tariq Mehmood, Saadia Zainab, Zulfiqar Ahmad, Muhammad Ammar Khan, Aamir Shehzad, Adnan Khaliq, Farhan Jahangir Chughtai and Atif Liaqat

Innovative health-promoting approaches of the era have verified phytoceutics as one of the prime therapeutic tools to alleviate numerous health-related ailments. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Innovative health-promoting approaches of the era have verified phytoceutics as one of the prime therapeutic tools to alleviate numerous health-related ailments. The purpose of this paper is to probe the nutraceutic potential of ginger flowers and leaves against hyperglycemia.

Design/methodology/approach

The aqueous extracts of ginger flowers and leaves were observed on Sprague Dawley rats for 8 weeks. Two parallel studies were carried out based on dietary regimes: control and hyperglycemic diets. At the end of the experimental modus, the overnight fed rats were killed to determine the concentration of glucose and insulin in serum. The insulin resistance and insulin secretions were also calculated by formulae by considering fasting glucose and fasting insulin concentrations. Furthermore, the feed and drink intakes, body weight gain and hematological analysis were also carried out.

Findings

In streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemic rats, the ginger flowers extract depicted 5.62% reduction; however, ginger leaves extract reduced the glucose concentration up to 7.11% (p = 0.001). Similarly, ginger flowers extract uplifted the insulin concentration up to 3.07%, while, by ginger leaves extract, the insulin value increased to 4.11% (p = 0.002). For the insulin resistance, the ginger flower showed 5.32% decrease; however, the insulin resistance was reduced to 6.48% by ginger leaves (p = 0.014). Moreover, the insulin secretion increased to 18.9% by flower extract and 21.8% by ginger leave extract (p = 0.001). The feed intake and body weight gain increased momentously by the addition of ginger flowers and leaves; however, the drink intake and hematological analysis remained non-significant by the addition of ginger parts.

Originality/value

Conclusively, it was revealed that leaves have more hypoglycemic potential as compared to flowers.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 January 2020

Christopher John Etheridge and Emma Derbyshire

Increasingly, interest in and the uptake of herbal infusions has advanced, namely, owing to their bioactive properties and potential links to health. Given this, the…

Abstract

Purpose

Increasingly, interest in and the uptake of herbal infusions has advanced, namely, owing to their bioactive properties and potential links to health. Given this, the purpose of the present review was to collate evidence from human trials for five popular herbal infusions.

Design/methodology/approach

The systematic review comprised ten human trials (560 participants), investigating inter-relationships between herbal infusions consumption and health. Only human studies involving German chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L. Asteraceae), ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe Zingiberaceae), lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L. Lamiaceae), peppermint (Mentha x spicata L. Lamiaceae)/spearmint (Mentha spicata L. Lamiaceae) and rosehip (Rosa canina L. Rosaceae) teas were included in the present paper.

Findings

Most herbal infusions serve as a good source of flavonoids and other polyphenols in the human diet. Studies included in this paper indicate that herbal infusions (1-3 cups tended to be drank daily; infusion rates up to 15 min) could benefit certain aspects of health. In particular, this includes aspects of sleep quality and glycaemic control (German chamomile), osteoarthritic stiffness and hormone control (spearmint), oxidative stress (lemon balm) and primary dysmenorrhea (rosehip).

Research limitations/implications

Ongoing research is needed using homogenous herbal infusion forms, brewing rates and volumes of water to further reinforce these findings. In the meantime, herbal infusions could provide a useful supplementary approach to improving certain aspects of well-being.

Originality/value

The present paper collates evidence from human trials for five popular herbal infusions.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 50 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2013

Neuza Jorge and Denise Andreo

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the antioxidant activity of ginger ethanol extract in soybean oil under thermoxidation.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the antioxidant activity of ginger ethanol extract in soybean oil under thermoxidation.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of four treatments were used: soybean oil free of synthetic antioxidants, soybean oil containing 2,500 mg/kg of ginger extract, soybean oil containing 50 mg/kg of TBHQ, soybean oil containing the mixture of natural extract, and TBHQ in the before‐cited concentration. The treatments were discontinuously submitted to plates heated at 180°C, for 20 hours. Samples were removed in the times of 0, 4, 8, 12, 16 and 20 hours of heating and they were analyzed as to their oxidative stability, total polar compounds, peroxide and conjugated diene values.

Findings

The results showed the efficiency of the ginger extract in protecting the oil against lipid oxidation. It could be concluded that ginger extract might be indicated as an additive that acts against lipid oxidation and, consequently, increases shelf life of food.

Practical implications

These studies may prove to be beneficial to the exploitation of natural antioxidant sources for the preservation and/or extension of raw and processed food shelf life. Therefore, they could also be applied in the area of pharmaceuticals for the protection of human life.

Originality/value

This study offers information on the use of natural antioxidants as an alternative to the use of synthetic antioxidants, which might be considered toxic.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2020

Tri Dewanti Widyaningsih, Astri Iga Siska, Roudlatul Fanani and Erryana Martati

This study aims to evaluate the immunomodulatory effect of traditional drink of black cincau-based wedang uwuh (WUB) on alloxan-induced diabetic rats.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to evaluate the immunomodulatory effect of traditional drink of black cincau-based wedang uwuh (WUB) on alloxan-induced diabetic rats.

Design/methodology/approach

WUB consists of dried herbs such as black cincau leaves (Mesona palustris BL), red ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc), cloves (Syzgium aromaticum), sappan wood (Caesalpinia sappan Lin) and soursop leaves (Annona muricata). In this study, the rats were divided into five groups: normal control, diabetic control and three groups of WUB (WUB 13.5 mL/kg and WUB 27 mL/kg) or wedang uwuh commercial (WUC) treated diabetic groups. WUB or WUC was administered by gavage for three days after rats were confirmed diabetic induced by alloxan; these injections were continued for 28 days. At the end of the experiment, the spleen of rats was analyzed using flow cytometry. Data were analyzed by ANOVA followed by Tukey test using Minitab version 16.0.

Findings

This study showed that WUB significantly inhibited the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (interferon-Y [IFN-ɣ] and tumor necrosis factor-α [TNF-a]) and anti-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin 10 [IL-10] and transforming growth factor-β [TGF-ß]), and achieved a balance between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines that were not significantly different from normal controls. WUB 27 was able to regulate the production of relative average cytokines IFN-ɣ (7.6 ± 3.5; p = 0.010), TNF-a (8.7 ± 2.4; p = 0.018), IL-10 (6.3 ± 2.4; p = 0.001) and TGF-ß (7.4 ± 2.1; p = 0.004) that was significantly different from diabetic control. This study’s results validate that the use of WUB can result in immunomodulatory activity in diabetic rats.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study on the immunomodulatory effect of WUB which is developed based on WUC; WUB has been used by Indonesian people as a functional beverage which acts as an immune booster and body warmer.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 50 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Rungrat Chamchan, Pornrat Sinchaipanit, Sasapin Disnil, Sitima Jittinandana, Anadi Nitithamyong and Nattira On-nom

Ice cream is one of the popular sweet throughout the world. However, it contains high fat and sugar but lacks natural antioxidants. Several herbs in Thailand which are…

Abstract

Purpose

Ice cream is one of the popular sweet throughout the world. However, it contains high fat and sugar but lacks natural antioxidants. Several herbs in Thailand which are traditionally used as food ingredients show high antioxidant properties such as ginger and lemongrass. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to develop reduced sugar herbal ice cream using lemongrass and ginger extract.

Design/methodology/approach

Two ice cream formulas were prepared by using the lemongrass or ginger extract at the levels of 10, 15 and 20 percent (w/w), respectively. Moreover, xylitol was added as a substituted sugar at 80, 90 and 100 percent (w/w). Sensory evaluation was conducted by nine-point hedonic scale. Moreover, the physical, chemical and microbiological properties of the final ice cream product were determined by comparing with the control formula.

Findings

Based on the sensory evaluation, the two herbal ice cream formulas (15 percent lemongrass or ginger extract) with 90 percent xylitol replacement have the highest overall acceptability score of 7.28 and 7.44 (like moderately), respectively. The viscosity, overrun value and hardness of the reduced sugar herbal ice cream were not significantly different as compared to control formula (p=0.05). The chemical composition analysis showed that the total sugar of the product decreased by 65 percent. Moreover, antioxidant activities of herbal ice creams were higher than the control formula. The number of total bacteria of reduced sugar herbal ice cream was less than 10 CFU/mL.

Originality/value

The reduced sugar consumption is useful for lowering the risk of non-communicable diseases (NCDs), especially diabetes mellitus. This paper presented the reduced sugar herbal ice cream formulas with high antioxidant activity. Therefore, these data could be the prototype in order to develop herbal and healthy ice cream product.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2008

B.A. Akinwande, B.I.O. Ade‐Omowaye, S.A. Olaniyan and O.O. Akintaro

This study aimed at the potential use of ginger‐flavoured soy‐cassava flour to produce high‐protein biscuits.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed at the potential use of ginger‐flavoured soy‐cassava flour to produce high‐protein biscuits.

Design/methodology/approach

Preparation of biscuit was done using soy‐cassava flour blends (0:100, 20:80, 30:70 and 40:60 w/w). Biscuit was also prepared from 100 per cent wheat flour to serve as control.

Findings

Chemical analysis indicated that the substitution of soy flour into cassava flour augmented the nutrient content of the biscuit, which indicates a good potential for meeting the nutrient requirements of school children. The use of ginger powder as flavouring agent effectively masked the beany flavour that is normally associated with soybean products. A sensory evaluation also confirmed good aroma and positive acceptability.

Originality/value

The findings in this study confirms the endless possibilities of protein enrichment of cassava flour for the production of biscuits as a potentially effective strategy for enhancing protein‐energy balance in children, particularly in developing countries. The value of this study lies in its potential as a product development strategy in combating protein‐energy malnutrition, thereby promoting good health, labour productivity and mental development.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 21 April 2020

Luthfia Dewi, Lara Ayu Lestari, Azizah Nur Astiningrum, Vita Fadhila, Nur Amala, Muhamad Abdal Bakrie and Nurul Hidayah

This study aims to evaluate the effect of the combination of tempeh and red ginger flour in hypercholesterolemic rats.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to evaluate the effect of the combination of tempeh and red ginger flour in hypercholesterolemic rats.

Design/methodology/approach

Sprague Dawley male rats (n = 30; body weight 150-200 g) were randomly divided by five groups (n = 6), consist of negative control (K−) group: group fed by normal diet (laboratory standard diet laboratory, 4.35 kcal/g, 0% cholesterol); positive control (K+) group: group fed by high cholesterol diet (5.28 kcal/g, 12.1% cholesterol); Treatment 1 (P1) group: group fed by high cholesterol diet and treated by tempeh flour (TF) 1.9 g/200 g body weight; Treatment 2 (P2) group: group fed by high cholesterol diet and treated by red ginger flour (RGF) 0.036 g/200 g body weight; and Treatment 3 (P3) group: group fed by high cholesterol diet and treated by a combination TF 0.95 g/200 g body weight and red ginger 0.018 g/200 g body weight. The lipid profiles and malondialdehyde (MDA) were assessed.

Findings

The combination of tempeh and red ginger has successfully exerted the total cholesterol (121.9 ± 3.41 mg/dL; p < 0.01), triglycerides (TG) (89.3 ± 2.94 mg/dL; p < 0.01), low-density lipoprotein (39.1 ± 1.59 mg/dL) and MDA (2.0 ± 0.24 mg/dL; p < 0.01) lower than the other treatments. Also, the combination of tempeh and red ginger treatment appeared the highest high-density lipoprotein concentration (63.4 ± 2.26 mg/dL; p < 0.01) compared to the other treatment groups. Total cholesterol and TG were predicted as the increasing of MDA concentration.

Originality/value

The combination treatments successfully improved the lipid profiles and MDA. Furthermore, the combination of tempeh and red ginger could be effective in supporting therapy as the hypolipidemic condition.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 51 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 17 May 2011

K. Dhanya, S. Syamkumar, S. Siju and B. Sasikumar

This study aims to treat the development and application of sequence characterised amplified region (SCAR) markers for the detection of plant based adulterants (dried red…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to treat the development and application of sequence characterised amplified region (SCAR) markers for the detection of plant based adulterants (dried red beet pulp and powdered Ziziphus nummularia fruits) in traded ground chilli.

Design/methodology/approach

Adulterant‐specific DNA fragments (red beet pulp specific – “Beet 01” and Z. nummularia specific – “Ziz 01”) identified by random amplified polymorphic DNA polymerase chain reaction (RAPD‐PCR) analysis were cloned and sequenced for SCAR marker development. Red beet pulp specific SCAR primer pair, B1, and Z. nummularia specific SCAR primer pair, Z1, were designed from the corresponding RAPD marker sequences to amplify SCAR markers of 320 bp and 389 bp, respectively. The utility of the SCAR markers for adulterant detection was verified in model blends of chilli powder with the adulterants. Six commercial samples of ground chilli powder were analysed using the SCAR markers.

Findings

SCAR markers could detect the adulterants at a concentration as low as 10 g adulterant kg−1 of blended sample. The Z. nummularia SCAR marker could detect the presence of Z. nummularia fruit adulteration in one of the commercial samples. All the market samples tested were free from red beet pulp adulteration.

Practical implications

The PCR‐based method developed in the study is simple, rapid, and sensitive and has the potential to be developed into a quantitative analytical method and for commercial PCR kits for the large‐scale screening of ground chilli to detect and prevent plant‐based adulterants. The work has public health significance too, as ground chilli is one of the major spices consumed worldwide.

Originality/value

The study is the first report on the development of SCAR markers for adulterant detection in ground chilli. This work has relevance, as adulteration is a major concern of the sanitary and phytosanitary issues of the World Trade Organization (WTO) agreement.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 113 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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