Search results

1 – 10 of 11
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 25 September 2019

Zhixian Yi

The purpose of this paper is to look at organizational culture and knowledge sharing, and to explore how a leader fosters a culture of knowledge sharing in an information…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to look at organizational culture and knowledge sharing, and to explore how a leader fosters a culture of knowledge sharing in an information organization.

Design/methodology/approach

The literature survey is used. It indicates that little is known about how to foster a culture of knowledge sharing from a leadership perspective in an information organization.

Findings

This study finds that the main approaches that a leader need to use to foster a culture of knowledge sharing are to set the mission, short-term, middle-term and long-term goals and objectives of fostering a culture of knowledge sharing, master as many leadership styles as possible, adjust and choose a leadership style that is appropriate to fostering a culture of knowledge sharing in a given situation, lead by example, develop messaging, make a communication plan, reward and recognize knowledge-sharing behaviors and make knowledge management fun.

Research limitations/implications

The limitation is that this study is solely focused on the literature survey and opinions.

Practical implications

This paper provides a useful overview of the approaches used to foster a culture of knowledge sharing in an information organization.

Originality/value

The views, approaches and suggestions will be useful and valuable to improve the success of knowledge sharing in information organizations in the digital age.

Details

Library Management, vol. 40 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 21 May 2020

Zhixian Yi

This study aimed for the examination of the change decision-making approaches utilised by academic library directors and the identification and explanation of the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed for the examination of the change decision-making approaches utilised by academic library directors and the identification and explanation of the determinants of the utilised approaches.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from a survey. The content analysis was utilised to analyse the qualitative data. Both descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyse the quantitative data.

Findings

The findings resulted in the identification of the approaches used to make change decisions and three categories of determinants. Directors actually utilised multiple and dual approaches more than single approaches to make change decisions. The determinants of number of library branches, number of subordinates, total years of directorship and years of present position played a significant role in the utilised approaches to making change decisions. However, the findings demonstrate that the determinants of age, gender, library size, library type, number of different positions, total years of library service and education level were not significant determinants of the utilised approaches to making change decisions.

Research limitations/implications

The limitation is that the results of this study are not applicable and generalisable to academic libraries beyond this classification using in this study.

Practical implications

The change decision-making approaches and the identified determinants will be useful and valuable for leaders and managers to make better decisions while managing change in the digital age.

Originality/value

The identification of the approaches and determinants provides information professionals with new knowledge and enables them to reflect the determinants of the utilised approaches and to make better change decisions in a given situation.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Zhixian Yi

The purpose of this paper is to examine how Australian academic librarians perceived effective techniques used to segment library users into smaller groups and the…

Downloads
1507

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how Australian academic librarians perceived effective techniques used to segment library users into smaller groups and the influencing factors for their perceptions of the used techniques.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was sent to 400 academic librarians in 37 Australian universities and 230 (57.5 per cent) respondents completed and returned surveys. The descriptive and inferential statistics and content analysis method were used to analyse the collected data.

Findings

A variety of effective techniques were utilised to segment library users. Library variables such as number of staff and number of library branches and human capital variables such as education level, years of present position, formally studying marketing and attending a workshop on marketing in the last five years were significant predictors of perceptions of the effective segmentation techniques used, but this study indicates that other predictors such as number of different library professional positions and years involved in all library services and demographical variables made no difference.

Practical implications

This paper provides a useful overview of the effective techniques used to segment library users.

Originality/value

The value of this study is that librarians may utilise the results to better understand different techniques, to reflect on the effectiveness of the used techniques, and to balance the weight of the influencing factors. This will enable them to segment library users more effectively in the future.

Details

Library Management, vol. 37 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 January 2016

Zhixian Yi

In the digital age, constant changes in libraries inform contemporary building design. An innovative library building design is a complicated process and can be viewed as…

Downloads
3047

Abstract

Purpose

In the digital age, constant changes in libraries inform contemporary building design. An innovative library building design is a complicated process and can be viewed as a continuous process of the use of tacit and explicit knowledge and innovative tools and approaches. Knowledge management (KM) can bring about the much needed innovation, and transform tacit knowledge to explicit knowledge. For the design of a library to be successful, it is necessary to apply KM to library building design. The purpose of this paper is to look at key change impacts, to explore how to manage knowledge in building design and to identify key design principles.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper looks at key change impacts, explores how to manage knowledge in library building design and pinpoints design principles.

Findings

This paper finds that KM can be vital to library building design, and it can be used in all stages: to examine the internal and external environments, transform tacit knowledge to explicit knowledge by using portals, and analyze existing and future issues and trends. When effectively used, KM will result in innovative design strategies and also will reduce the time and costs of the building design and plan processes. The main principles of library building design are flexibility, accessibility, safety and security, applicability, adaptability, efficiency, and sustainability.

Practical implications

This paper provides a useful overview of how to manage knowledge in library building design and design principles.

Originality/value

The views, discussions, and suggestions will be of value to improve the effectiveness of library building design.

Details

Library Management, vol. 37 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 November 2013

Zhixian Yi, Damian Lodge and Sigrid McCausland

The purpose of this paper is to examine how Australian academic librarians marketed their services and resources, which marketing approaches were most effective, and the…

Downloads
1725

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how Australian academic librarians marketed their services and resources, which marketing approaches were most effective, and the factors influencing the perceptions of the approaches used.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was sent to 37 academic librarians in Australia. The response rate was 54.1 percent. The information sheet and consent form for phone interview participants were e-mailed to 17 participants and ten signed consent forms were e-mailed back to the researchers. The response rate was 58.8 percent. The qualitative data were analysed using content analysis. The collected quantitative and qualitative data were analysed using descriptive (frequencies, percentages, means, standard deviations) and inferential statistics (correlations).

Findings

Academic librarians were involved in a variety of marketing activities and had varied perceptions of the effective approaches used to market services and resources. Correlation analysis confirms that demographics, human capital and library variables play significant roles in predicting librarians' perceptions of the effective marketing techniques used.

Research limitations/implications

Because of very small sample size, the results may lack generalisability. Future research is a large-scale study.

Practical implications

This paper provides a better understanding of academic librarians' attitudes, views and effective techniques with regard to marketing their services and resources.

Originality/value

Librarians may use the results to reflect on the effectiveness of the marketing approaches used, to balance the weight of the factors' influences, and to better understand various effective marketing approaches to enable them to market academic library services and resources more effectively in the future.

Details

Library Management, vol. 34 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2012

Zhixian Yi

This study aims to examine how academic library directors conducted meetings in the change process and the factors influencing the approaches used.

Downloads
808

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine how academic library directors conducted meetings in the change process and the factors influencing the approaches used.

Design/methodology/approach

Bolman and Deal's reframing change model provided the foundation for this research. An online survey was sent to 1,010 academic library directors in the USA. The response rate was 59 percent. The qualitative data were analyzed using content analysis. The collected quantitative and qualitative data were analyzed using descriptive (frequencies, percentages, means, standard deviations) and inferential statistics (binary and multinomial logistic regressions).

Findings

Most directors used multiple approaches to conduct meetings in the change process. The structural and human resource approaches were the most frequent single approaches. Regression analysis confirms that demographics, human capital, and library variables play significant roles in conducting meetings.

Research limitations/implications

Data in this study were collected from directors in libraries of doctoral granting, master‐granting, and baccalaureate‐only colleges, and universities. Accordingly, the results of the study might not be generalized to college and university libraries outside this classification.

Practical implications

This paper provides a useful overview of the approaches used to conduct meetings in the change process and the factors influencing the approaches used.

Originality/value

Directors may use the results to reflect on different options of the strategies for conducting meetings in the change process and balance the weight of the factors' influences. The results may also help librarians better understand various approaches to conducting meetings in the change process.

Details

Library Management, vol. 33 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 January 2013

Zhixian Yi

The purpose of this study is to examine how academic library directors set goals for change in the information age and the factors influencing the approaches used.

Downloads
2002

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine how academic library directors set goals for change in the information age and the factors influencing the approaches used.

Design/methodology/approach

Bolman and Deal's reframing change model provided the foundation for this research. An online survey was sent to 1,010 academic library directors in the USA. The response rate was 59 percent. The qualitative data were analysed using content analysis. The collected quantitative and qualitative data were analysed using descriptive (frequencies, percentages, means, standard deviations) and inferential statistics (binary and multinomial logistic regressions).

Findings

Most directors used multiple approaches to set goals for change. The structural and human resource approaches were the most frequent single approaches. Regression analysis confirmed that demographics, human capital, and library variables played significant roles in setting goals for change.

Research limitations/implications

Data in this study were collected from directors in libraries of doctoral granting, master‐granting, and baccalaureate‐only colleges and universities. Accordingly, the results of the study might not be generalized to college and university libraries outside this classification.

Practical implications

This paper provides a useful overview of the approaches used to set goals for change and the factors influencing the approaches used.

Originality/value

Directors may use the results to reflect on different options of the strategies for setting goals for change in the information age and balance the weight of the factors' influences. The results may also help librarians better understand various approaches to setting goals for change in the information age.

Details

Library Management, vol. 34 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 25 February 2008

Zhixian Yi

The purpose of this paper is to examine academic library director and graduate student perceptions of knowledge management for library strategic planning, including its…

Downloads
5593

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine academic library director and graduate student perceptions of knowledge management for library strategic planning, including its definition and potential applications and benefits.

Design/methodology/approach

A multiple‐choice e‐mail survey was sent to 40 academic library directors and 19 graduate students of information and library science. Respondents were asked to define knowledge management for strategic planning and answer related questions on its potential applications and benefits. Respondents could also specify their own views on the subject.

Findings

There are minor differences in how library directors and graduate students define knowledge management. However, there is a disparity in how these two groups view potential applications and benefits of knowledge management for library strategic planning. Less than half of the directors (41.4 per cent) but the majority of students (77.8 per cent) believes that knowledge management is being applied to library strategic planning to create a portal for external information including links to library patron groups, research groups and publications. In addition, the majority of directors (75.8 per cent), but only half of the students (50.0 per cent) believe that knowledge management will improve the sharing of internal and external information.

Research limitations/implications

The number of participants in this e‐mail survey is limited in both size and location. Future research should include more participants from a wider area and examine more concrete issues.

Practical implications

This paper provides a useful overview of the perceptions of knowledge management, including its applications and potential benefits for library strategic planning.

Originality/value

Differing viewpoints between library directors and graduate students reflects the contrast between real‐world experience and academic applications. Acknowledging these differences is the first step toward ensuring that in the future, knowledge management is consistently and effectively applied to library strategic planning.

Details

Library Management, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Yan Quan Liu, Craig Martin, Eileen Roehl, Zhixian Yi and Sheila Ward

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of public digital services on urban/suburban residents, to uncover the current usage of public digital services and…

Downloads
1589

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of public digital services on urban/suburban residents, to uncover the current usage of public digital services and levels of satisfaction with the digital resources/content in urban digital libraries (networked computers with specific information infrastructure designed free for public use).

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach is used as a main stream in the research framework as the method of inquiry. Qualitative one‐to‐one interviews include surveying users who use public library websites, observing the users, consulting librarians about the users, and interviewing the users.

Findings

Provides demographic patterns of the patrons' interaction with the digital services public libraries provide, and the satisfaction and compliances the residents have regarding information access through the digital technology in urban/suburban Connecticut.

Practical implications

Because of the small number of participants, this study has limitations in being generalized to an understanding of overall patterns of urban residents using digital resources in public settings in the USA or elsewhere, however, it could be a good pilot study for a nation‐wide survey with the methods tested.

Originality/value

This study helps fulfill the scant empirical attention given to the impact access to public digital information or use of digital library services on the urban/suburban residents, offers new data that help public library administrators enhance the impact, efficiency and value of the public digital library services to improve the digital learning environments for life‐long education at all levels in a broad community of urban/suburban users.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 April 2009

Fan Aihong

The number of international students and overseas faculty in Tsinghua University in Beijing has grown rapidly in recent years. How to help foreign users overcome the…

Downloads
2229

Abstract

Purpose

The number of international students and overseas faculty in Tsinghua University in Beijing has grown rapidly in recent years. How to help foreign users overcome the language barrier and make a full use of the library is a realistic problem that is encountered by many libraries. This paper aims to introduce an exploration of Tsinghua University Library experiences and to give some suggestions for the future.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper first describes the large influx of international students and then analyzes the information needs of foreign users by showing the results of a user survey conducted by the Tsinghua University Library in 2007. The library has made a great effort in creating a bilingual information environment for foreign users. A full spectrum of practices is presented in respect of resource, service, infrastructure and the English skill of librarians, etc.

Findings

Foreign users have multi‐level needs for libraries and the language need is the most outstanding one. As an integral part of the university community, foreign users share many information requirements with Chinese users. Therefore, the library must try to solve the language problem and enhance its academic support functions at the same time.

Practical implications

Libraries in non‐English‐speaking countries can do a lot to help foreign users with limited local language competency to make use of the library. Building a bilingual information environment is comprehensive systems engineering with many aspects involved.

Originality/value

This paper makes useful suggestions for creating a bilingual library information environment for foreign users of today and also provides tips for future improvement.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

1 – 10 of 11