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1 – 10 of 10
Open Access
Article
Publication date: 25 January 2024

Richard Byrne, Declan Patton, Zena Moore, Tom O’Connor, Linda Nugent and Pinar Avsar

This systematic review paper aims to investigate seasonal ambient change’s impact on the incidence of falls among older adults.

Abstract

Purpose

This systematic review paper aims to investigate seasonal ambient change’s impact on the incidence of falls among older adults.

Design/methodology/approach

The population, exposure, outcome (PEO) structured framework was used to frame the research question prior to using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis framework. Three databases were searched, and a total of 12 studies were found for inclusion, and quality appraisal was carried out. Data extraction was performed, and narrative analysis was carried out.

Findings

Of the 12 studies, 2 found no link between seasonality and fall incidence. One study found fall rates increased during warmer months, and 9 of the 12 studies found that winter months and their associated seasonal changes led to an increase in the incidence in falls. The overall result was that cooler temperatures typically seen during winter months carried an increased risk of falling for older adults.

Originality/value

Additional research is needed, most likely examining the climate one lives in. However, the findings are relevant and can be used to inform health-care providers and older adults of the increased risk of falling during the winter.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1985

Have you any idea who the person was who recommended that book you just purchased for the library? And who told you not to buy a title?

Abstract

Have you any idea who the person was who recommended that book you just purchased for the library? And who told you not to buy a title?

Details

Collection Building, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 20 June 2023

Teresa Heath and Caroline Tynan

The purpose of this study is to examine the potential of integrating material from the arts into postgraduate curricula to deepen students’ engagement with marketing phenomena…

1279

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the potential of integrating material from the arts into postgraduate curricula to deepen students’ engagement with marketing phenomena. The authors assess the use of arts-based activities, within a broader critical pedagogy, for encouraging imaginative and analytical thinking.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors devised two learning activities and an interpretive method for studying their value. The activities were an individual essay connecting themes in song lyrics to marketing, and a group photography project. These were applied, within a broader, critical approach, in postgraduate modules on sustainability, ethics and critical marketing. Data collection comprised diaries kept by the teachers, open-ended feedback from students and students’ assignments.

Findings

Students showed high levels of engagement, reflexivity and depth of thought, in felt experiences of learning. Their ability to make connections not explicitly in the materials, and requiring imaginative jumps, was notable. Several reported lasting changes to their behaviour. Some found the tasks initially intimidating or, once they were more engaged, stressful or saddening.

Research limitations/implications

This adds to scholarship on management education by showing the usefulness of an arts-based approach towards a transformative agenda.

Practical implications

It offers a template of how to draw from the arts to strengthen critical engagement upon which marketing teachers can build. It also contains practical advice on the challenges and benefits of doing so.

Social implications

The authors provide evidence that this approach can enhance sensitivity and reflexivity in students, potentially producing more ethical and sustainable decisions in future.

Originality/value

The pedagogical interventions are novel and of value to lecturers seeking to enhance critical engagement with theory. An empirical study of an attempt to integrate arts into teaching marketing represents a promising direction, given the discipline’s creative nature.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 57 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2003

Ronald J. Burke, Zena Burgess and Fay Oberklaid

This study tested a model predicting workaholic job behaviors among Australian psychologists. The model and measures had been used in a previous study of Canadian business school…

Abstract

This study tested a model predicting workaholic job behaviors among Australian psychologists. The model and measures had been used in a previous study of Canadian business school graduates. Four blocks of predictors were examined using hierarchical regression analyses: personal demographics; work situation characteristics; workaholism antecedents (personal beliefs and fears, workplace values supporting work‐personal life imbalance); and workaholism components. Data were collected using anonymous self‐report questionnaires. Findings replicated previous work; both workaholism antecedents and workaholism components generally accounted for significant increments in variance on the validating job behaviors controlling for personal demographics and work situation characteristics.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 8 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Zena Burgess, Ronald J. Burke and Fay Oberklaid

Purpose − This study aims to examine gender differences in three workaholism and workaholism‐related variables. Design/methodology/approach − Uses measures developed by Spence and…

1223

Abstract

Purpose − This study aims to examine gender differences in three workaholism and workaholism‐related variables. Design/methodology/approach − Uses measures developed by Spence and Robbins and examines gender differences in three workaholism components, workaholic job behaviors and work and well‐being outcomes among Australian psychologists. Findings − Females and males were found to differ on many personal and situational demographic characters, two of three workaholism components (work involvement, and feeling driven to work) males scoring higher. Females, however, reported higher levels of particular workaholic job behaviors (e.g. perfectionism, job stress) likely to be associated with lower levels of satisfaction and well‐being. Females and males scored similarly on work outcomes, family satisfaction, physical health and emotional health. Females indicated more psychosomatic symptoms and less community satisfaction but more friends satisfaction. Originality/value − Aids in the understanding of workaholism in organizations.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2004

Ronald J. Burke, Fay Oberklaid and Zena Burgess

This research considered potential antecedents and consequences of workaholism in a sample of 324 female Australian psychologists. Three workaholism types were compared based on…

1087

Abstract

This research considered potential antecedents and consequences of workaholism in a sample of 324 female Australian psychologists. Three workaholism types were compared based on measures developed by Spence and Robbins. Data were collected using self‐report questionnaires completed anonymously. Antecedents included personal and work situation characteristics, a measure of personal beliefs and fears and a measure of organizational values supporting work‐personal life imbalance. Consequences included measures of validating job behaviors, work outcomes, psychological health and extra‐work satisfactions. The three workaholism types differed in personal beliefs and fears, work addicts (WAs) scoring higher than work enthusiasts (WEs). WAs indicated less job and career satisfaction than both WEs and enthusiastic addicts (EAs) and lower future career prospects than did EAs. WAs also reported lower emotional health than did WEs. The workaholism types were similar on extra work satisfactions. Each workaholism type also worked similar hours per week as well. These findings validate previous conclusions indicating similar findings for both men and women.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Ronald J. Burke, Zena Burgess and Barry Fallon

The purpose of this study is to examine potential consequences of workaholism among 98 women business graduates in early careers. It replicates earlier work based primarily on men.

1949

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine potential consequences of workaholism among 98 women business graduates in early careers. It replicates earlier work based primarily on men.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from women business graduates of a single Australian university using anonymously completed questionnaires. Three workaholism components identified by Spence and Robbins were included: work involvement, feeling driven to work due to inner pressures and work enjoyment. Consequences included several validating job behaviors such as perfectionism and non‐delegation, work and extra‐work satisfactions and indicators of psychological well‐being.

Findings

Workaholism components generally had significant relationships with the validating job behaviors, work outcomes and indicators of psychological well‐being but not with extra‐work satisfactions. These findings provided a partial replications of previous conclusions based on primarily male samples.

Research limitations/implications

These include the small sample size, limits to generalizability of conclusions based on one Australian university, and data collection at only one point in time.

Originality/value

Previous workaholism research was based on North American men. This study extends this work to women in other countries.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 November 2022

Rita Gunther McGrath

The reality of organizing new growth ventures is that every place to locate them in the organization has pros and cons.

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Abstract

Purpose

The reality of organizing new growth ventures is that every place to locate them in the organization has pros and cons.

Design/Methodology/Approach

Using a set of seven archetypes, executives can figure out which location solution fits the initiative and the parent company best.

Findings

Organizations pursuing ventures have a choice of how much separation/distance to insert between ongoing operations and the new business.

Practical/Implications

The “right” place to locate a venture also depends on such factors as the situation of the parent organization, the level of innovation maturity the parent organization has and the form and functions of the venture.

Originality/Value

One of the most critical decisions that executives need to make as they contemplate getting started with setting up an innovation/growth function within their organizations is where, organizationally, it belongs. Seven alternatives are analyzed.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 51 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 11 June 2024

Michal Ganz Meishar

This study aims to examine the contribution of informal encounters outside the school walls between local Israeli families from “Waldorf Education” and immigrant families from…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the contribution of informal encounters outside the school walls between local Israeli families from “Waldorf Education” and immigrant families from Africa from formal state education and explore the consequences of these encounters on the development of lifelong learning competences. Research questions are as follows: In what way do non-formal encounters lead to the development of lifelong learning ability? What are the challenges and consequences of non-formal activity for research participants, families and educators from the pedagogical, social and personal perspectives?

Design/methodology/approach

The research uses a qualitative-interpretive case study approach that allows for in-depth observation of the phenomenon within the context of reality to understand the case, a non-formal encounter between two groups of parents from different cultures, languages and educational attitudes. In this case study, it is possible to generalize from the local to the global and examine processes, actions and behaviors in the studied case (Creswell et al., 2018; Yin, 2009). This empirical study allows description, analysis, understanding and explanation of the challenges and actions in organizing and holding non-formal encounters from personal experiences as a first source.

Findings

The analysis of the data brought up two main categories that represent the actions and insights from the non-formal encounters for developing lifelong learning competences: create a personal dialogue to strengthen trust and confidence; foster parental involvement. Non-formal encounters between families from different cultural-social backgrounds may promote lifelong learning competences such as tolerance, inclusion and openness. However, external intervention by a social association is required to organize, support and operate them.

Research limitations/implications

The research’s limitation was that it was conducted in the country’s center. Therefore, the findings must be considered in the context in which they are presented and not generalized to other regions or communities from other cultures in Israel and the world. A few limited encounters may affect the author’s interpretation of the study data. In addition, expressions of “social desire” that may be expressed in interviews must be considered.

Practical implications

This study emphasizes social activism. Despite all the differences and tensions, creating an equal space in the families’ encounters is essential for lifelong learning. The immigrant parents participated in decision-making, the stages of organization and the activities themselves during the encounters. This partnership strengthened their commitment and responsibility. Because they are a powerless minority group, it should not be assumed that two encounters will improve their self-confidence. The proof is that fewer participants came to the last encounter. Education experts must maintain consistency and continuity in forming partnerships with immigrant families over time and as part of lifelong learning.

Social implications

The non-formal encounters between the two groups of families create an atmosphere of equality: all are parents of children seeking to inculcate humane and social values. The collaborative atmosphere contributed to the understanding that closeness overpowers distance. Everyone is troubled by similar issues of parenting, enjoyment of children, nutritious food and a shared desire to be good citizens while maintaining tolerance, reciprocity and respect.

Originality/value

Non-formal encounters are actively performed to create belonging when the “others and we” join together for the community and the children. This is an extensive, open and accessible platform for strengthening social consciousness and understanding the connection between teaching, culture and society to promote equality in education. This study will allow schools to expand the boundaries of communication with parents and initiate additional activities with other social groups to foster children’s integration. It will enrich the academic knowledge about connections and communication of educators, families from Israel and immigrant families in developing a partnership in the school to promote lifelong learning.

Article
Publication date: 21 July 2022

Sarah Barriage

This study aims to explore young children’s information practices within the context of their individual interests, examining children’s interest-related information activities…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore young children’s information practices within the context of their individual interests, examining children’s interest-related information activities, challenges encountered and enablers received.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants included 18 children between five and seven years of age and their parents. Data were collected using a multi-stage participatory approach. Children shared their experiences via a book discussion, poster activity, participant-generated photography and a photo-elicitation interview. Parents provided information about family demographics and their perceptions of their children’s individual interests, information practices and digital media use via questionnaires. Data were analyzed using the constant comparative method.

Findings

Young children seek information via print and digital objects, other people and experiences, and use information by applying it to their activities and sharing information with others. Challenges to information activities include children’s own capabilities and skills, constraints of information sources and parental restrictions on their activities. Enablers include affordances of technology and parental support.

Originality/value

This study takes a holistic approach to understanding young children’s perspectives of their information activities, examining information use and sharing activities in addition to information seeking.

Details

Information and Learning Sciences, vol. 123 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

Keywords

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