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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Ronald J. Burke, Fay Oberklaid and Zena Burgess

This study examined the relationship of female and male psychologists perceptions of organizational values supportive of work‐personal life balance and their work…

Abstract

This study examined the relationship of female and male psychologists perceptions of organizational values supportive of work‐personal life balance and their work experiences, work and non‐work satisfactions, and psychological well‐being. Data were collected from 458 Australian psychologists using anonymous questionnaires. Psychologists reporting organizational values more supportive of work‐personal life balance also reported greater job and career satisfaction, less work stress, less intention to quit, greater family satisfaction, fewer psychosomatic symptoms, and more positive emotional well‐being. Interestingly, perceptions of organizational values supportive of work‐personal life balance were unrelated to hours and extra‐hours worked and job involvement.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Ronald J. Burke, Zena Burgess and Fay Oberrlaid

This study examined the relationship of male psychologists’ perception of organizational values supporting work‐personal life balance in their workplace and their work…

Abstract

This study examined the relationship of male psychologists’ perception of organizational values supporting work‐personal life balance in their workplace and their work experiences, indicators of work and life satisfaction and psychological well‐being. Data were collected from 134 men using anonymous questionnaires. Male psychologists reporting organizational values more supportive of work‐personal life balance also reported more joy in work, less job stress, lower intentions to quit, greater job, and career and more optimistic career prospects, satisfaction, fewer psychosomatic symptoms and more positive emotional and physical well‐being. Interestingly, organizational values supporting balance had no relationship with hours worked on job involvement.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 23 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Benjamin Palmer, Melissa Walls, Zena Burgess and Con Stough

Emotional intelligence has become increasingly popular as a measure for identifying potentially effective leaders, and as a tool for developing effective leadership…

Abstract

Emotional intelligence has become increasingly popular as a measure for identifying potentially effective leaders, and as a tool for developing effective leadership skills. Despite this popularity, however, there is little empirical research that substantiates the efficacy of emotional intelligence in these areas. The aim of the present paper was to explore the relationship between emotional intelligence and effective leadership. Emotional intelligence was assessed by a modified version of the Trait Meta Mood Scale in 43 participants employed in management roles. Effective leaders were identified as those who displayed a transformational rather than transactional leadership style as measured by the multifactor leadership questionnaire. Emotional intelligence correlated with several components of transformational leadership suggesting that it may be an important component of effective leadership. In particular emotional intelligence may account for how effective leaders monitor and respond to subordinates and make them feel at work.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Ronald J. Burke, Zena Burgess and Barry Fallon

The purpose of this exploratory study is to examine the relationship of the perceived presence of organizational practices designed to support women's career advancement…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this exploratory study is to examine the relationship of the perceived presence of organizational practices designed to support women's career advancement and their work and extra‐work satisfaction and psychological well‐being.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 98 early career women in Australia using anonymously completed questionnaires. Five organizational practices combined into a composite measure were considered; top management support and intervention, policies and resources, use of gender in human resource management, training and development initiatives and recruiting and external relations efforts.

Findings

Women reporting more organizational practices supportive of women, with higher levels of job and career satisfaction, and indicated fewer psychosomatic symptoms and less emotional exhaustion. Organizational practices were unrelated to intent to quit or extra‐work satisfactions and physical or emotional well‐being.

Research limitations/implications

Further research is needed to determine if results generalize to women in later career stages.

Practical implications

Guidance for organizations interested in supporting women's career advancement are offered.

Originality/value

The paper illustrates an understanding of the qualities that are part of work environments that are supportive of the career aspirations of women (and men).

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2003

Ronald J. Burke, Zena Burgess and Fay Oberklaid

This study tested a model predicting workaholic job behaviors among Australian psychologists. The model and measures had been used in a previous study of Canadian business…

Abstract

This study tested a model predicting workaholic job behaviors among Australian psychologists. The model and measures had been used in a previous study of Canadian business school graduates. Four blocks of predictors were examined using hierarchical regression analyses: personal demographics; work situation characteristics; workaholism antecedents (personal beliefs and fears, workplace values supporting work‐personal life imbalance); and workaholism components. Data were collected using anonymous self‐report questionnaires. Findings replicated previous work; both workaholism antecedents and workaholism components generally accounted for significant increments in variance on the validating job behaviors controlling for personal demographics and work situation characteristics.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 8 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Ronald J. Burke, Zena Burgess and Barry Fallon

This study aims to examine potential benefits from a mentor relationship to women managers and professionals in early career.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine potential benefits from a mentor relationship to women managers and professionals in early career.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 98 women business school graduates using an anonymously completed questionnaire. Respondents identified a more senior individual who had a positive influence in the development of their career, provided descriptive characteristics of this relationship and described its character. Three mentor functions were considered: role model, career development and psychosocial.

Findings

There were few differences as a function of the gender of the mentor though respondents having female mentors indicated more role modeling and tended to report more psychosocial functions. Respondents reporting more mentor functions also indicated higher levels of job and career satisfaction, more optimistic future career prospects and fewer psychosomatic symptoms.

Originality/value

Adds to the understanding of mentoring by including psychological well‐being variables as potential mentoring outcomes.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Zena Burgess, Ronald J. Burke and Fay Oberklaid

Purpose − This study aims to examine gender differences in three workaholism and workaholism‐related variables. Design/methodology/approach − Uses measures developed by…

Abstract

Purpose − This study aims to examine gender differences in three workaholism and workaholism‐related variables. Design/methodology/approach − Uses measures developed by Spence and Robbins and examines gender differences in three workaholism components, workaholic job behaviors and work and well‐being outcomes among Australian psychologists. Findings − Females and males were found to differ on many personal and situational demographic characters, two of three workaholism components (work involvement, and feeling driven to work) males scoring higher. Females, however, reported higher levels of particular workaholic job behaviors (e.g. perfectionism, job stress) likely to be associated with lower levels of satisfaction and well‐being. Females and males scored similarly on work outcomes, family satisfaction, physical health and emotional health. Females indicated more psychosomatic symptoms and less community satisfaction but more friends satisfaction. Originality/value − Aids in the understanding of workaholism in organizations.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2004

Ronald J. Burke, Fay Oberklaid and Zena Burgess

This research considered potential antecedents and consequences of workaholism in a sample of 324 female Australian psychologists. Three workaholism types were compared…

Abstract

This research considered potential antecedents and consequences of workaholism in a sample of 324 female Australian psychologists. Three workaholism types were compared based on measures developed by Spence and Robbins. Data were collected using self‐report questionnaires completed anonymously. Antecedents included personal and work situation characteristics, a measure of personal beliefs and fears and a measure of organizational values supporting work‐personal life imbalance. Consequences included measures of validating job behaviors, work outcomes, psychological health and extra‐work satisfactions. The three workaholism types differed in personal beliefs and fears, work addicts (WAs) scoring higher than work enthusiasts (WEs). WAs indicated less job and career satisfaction than both WEs and enthusiastic addicts (EAs) and lower future career prospects than did EAs. WAs also reported lower emotional health than did WEs. The workaholism types were similar on extra work satisfactions. Each workaholism type also worked similar hours per week as well. These findings validate previous conclusions indicating similar findings for both men and women.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2003

Zena Burgess and Barry Fallon

Using social identity theory as a framework, the present study empirically tests the idea that women can maintain positions on corporate boards over a number of years…

Abstract

Using social identity theory as a framework, the present study empirically tests the idea that women can maintain positions on corporate boards over a number of years through becoming part of the board’s ingroup. A sample of 32 women directors who were part of a study of corporate directors in 1995 participated in the six‐year follow‐up. A series of hypotheses are tested using nonparametric statistical techniques to test differences in women directors’ personal and board characteristics over the two time periods. Implications of the results are drawn for women seeking to maintain or gain board positions and for the applicability of social identity theory to the research area.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 18 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Keywords

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