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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Zelealem T. Temtime and Getachew H. Solomon

Examines the relationship between TQM perceptions, planning behavior, and firm size in SMEs in Ethiopia. Primary data were collected from 57 SMEs through a questionnaire…

Abstract

Examines the relationship between TQM perceptions, planning behavior, and firm size in SMEs in Ethiopia. Primary data were collected from 57 SMEs through a questionnaire. However, as the study is a preliminary investigation, uses only simple descriptive statistics to analyse the sample data. The results are not significantly different from those of previous studies in SMEs. TQM perceptions vary with firm size and planning behavior. The findings also indicated that excessive emphasis on short‐term profitability, lack of resources, business planning and vision, and misperception of TQM practices are among the main obstacles to the adoption of a formal TQM program. Suggests some lessons and implications for future research.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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Article
Publication date: 23 February 2010

Jaloni Pansiri and Zelealem T. Temtime

This paper aims to examine perceived critical success factors (CSFs) affecting the performance of small to medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) and their relationship with firm…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine perceived critical success factors (CSFs) affecting the performance of small to medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) and their relationship with firm characteristics. The paper also seeks to investigate the interdependence relationship among the perceived CSFs themselves using correlation coefficients.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is part of a wider study that was designed to investigate the perceived critical success/failure factors (PCSFs) affecting the development of SMEs. The study is based on a review of the literature, which provided a theoretical understanding of both CSFs and firm characteristics. This theoretical linkage was then tested using primary data that were collected through a two‐page questionnaire survey of 203 SMEs randomly selected from three cities in the Republic of Botswana. Principal component analysis (PCA) with Varimax rotation was used to reduce the data. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was conducted to test the relationship between firm characteristics and perceived impacts of selected CSFs, and correlations were used to assess the relationships between the CSFs.

Findings

The study identifies ten sets of perceived CSFs affecting the performance of SMEs; statistically significant relationships between the perceived impact of selected CSFs and firm‐specific variables, indicating that the perceived impact of CSFs vary from firm to firm depending on their size, age, industry, and management profile; and statistically significant relationships among the selected CSFs themselves.

Research limitations/implications

The study relies exclusively on a questionnaire as the data collection instrument, and many respondents were unwilling to participate in the survey. Therefore, it took the authors eight months to collect 203 questionnaires. This forced the authors to make some important changes from the original research proposal.

Practical implications

SME managers and advisors should not deal with CSFs individually, but should adopt an integrated and innovative approach to deal with them collectively. This approach should consider SMEs' uniqueness, given that these CSFs are perceived differently depending on firm characteristics. The paper forwards some research and policy implications for designing SME support and promotional interventions.

Originality/value

The paper uses well‐established and researched CSFs in the SME literature. To this end, the paper's originality and value lie in the investigation of these factors in Botswana. However, the findings are applicable to most SMEs, since they continue to suffer from the same problems worldwide.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2008

Jaloni Pansiri and Zelealem T. Temtime

The paper aims to identify perceived critical managerial factors (PCMFs) affecting the performance of SMEs, show the direction and extent of relationship between PCMFs and…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to identify perceived critical managerial factors (PCMFs) affecting the performance of SMEs, show the direction and extent of relationship between PCMFs and firm characteristics, and forward some research and policy implications.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a survey questionnaire to collect data on SMEs' perceptions of the degree of impact of selected managerial issues on their performance. The data were factor analyzed (principal component analysis), purified (Varimax rotation) and validated for reliability (Cronbach's α values) to identify the PCMFs. Both descriptive and inferential statistics were used to present and analyze the data.

Findings

The paper identifies and ranks four PCMFs affecting the performance of SMEs in a developing African economy. Important relationships are found between PCMFs and firm characteristics, and among the PCMFs themselves. The paper forwards some research and policy implications.

Research limitations/implications

The paper shows the need to replicate the study in other places to see whether the findings remain consistent. Although based on a mixed sample and limited to examination of perceptions rather than actual problems, the findings are highly relevant in designing business support initiatives and training programmes for SMEs.

Practical implications

Future research should develop a framework for conceptualizing and operationalizing the managerial construct in the context of SMEs. Small business support providers, policy makers and practitioners should identify, prioritize and customize the most influential managerial problems in designing entrepreneurial training and assistance programmes.

Originality/value

Research in the study of PCMFs in SMEs in developing African economies is scarce and lacking. The findings in this paper serve as an addition to the existing limited research output in the area. Moreover, the study adopted a systematic approach to identify, factor analyze, test and validate the measurement instrument for the managerial construct.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2004

Zelealem T. Temtime, S.V. Chinyoka and J.P.W. Shunda

There is a general consensus among public policy makers, academics and researchers that entrepreneurship is a vital route to economic advancement for both developed and…

Abstract

There is a general consensus among public policy makers, academics and researchers that entrepreneurship is a vital route to economic advancement for both developed and developing economies. As a result, a host of small business assistance programs are conducted by public, private and nonprofit organizations. Although the need for integrating these programs has always been a high priority on the national agenda for public policy and research in entrepreneurship, their implementation particularly in developing economies is characterized by fragmentation and lack of coordination. Small business assistance will be meaningful if they are designed in a holistic and systematic way and implemented with a view to achieve long term sustainable development. This paper offers a conceptual framework for designing an integrated model of small business assistance. The paper identifies the major characteristics of small firms and potential small business assistance programs, and presents a decision tree model that matches the characteristics of firms with appropriate assistance program(s). A case study of small business assistance programs in the Republic of Botswana was conducted to provide an empirical evidence of the need for an integrated design or model. Finally, conclusions, discussions and the implications of the model for policy makers, practitioners and further research are presented.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Zelealem T. Temtime and Jaloni Pansiri

The paper investigates the perceived critical managerial factors affecting the performance of small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs).

Abstract

Purpose

The paper investigates the perceived critical managerial factors affecting the performance of small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs).

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 250 SMEs in Botswana through questionnaire and analyzed using simple descriptive statistics. The respondents were asked to rate the impact of 34 selected items (derived from small business management literature) using a five‐point Likert type scale ranging from very high (5) to very low (1).

Findings

The findings revealed that four factors (managerial action, human resources development, managerial background and organization development) emerged as critical management problems affecting the survival and growth of SMEs in Botswana.

Research limitations/implications

Although the findings are based on perceptions of managers rather than actual impact analysis, they have practical implications for the development of a proactive management development and training and small business support programs in developing economies like Botswana.

Practical implications

The paper promotes the importance of designing management development and support programs based on assessment of the organizational and managerial problems and the objective conditions in which SMEs are operating.

Originality/value

This article discusses SMEs in Botswana.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Article
Publication date: 26 April 2011

Zelealem T. Temtime and Rebana N. Mmereki

The purpose of this paper is to examine the degree of satisfaction and perceived relevance of the Graduate Business Education (GBE) programme at the University of Botswana.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the degree of satisfaction and perceived relevance of the Graduate Business Education (GBE) programme at the University of Botswana.

Design/methodology/approach

A self‐administered questionnaire and face to face interviews were used to collect data from Master of Business Administration (MBA) participants on their reason for studying MBA, level of satisfaction, and the extent to which the skills and experiences obtained correlate with those required by the corporate world. The data were analyzed using simple descriptive statistics.

Findings

The majority of the respondents are male adults attending part time MBA classes and working full time in administrative positions in the public and private sectors. The study found that improved managerial skills, career development and broader business insights are major reasons for joining the MBA programme, while employability and economic gains were ranked low as driving forces. Even though the overall satisfaction with the programme is mixed and inconclusive, the MBA programme has assisted participants to develop basic management and administration skills. However, the programme puts greater emphasis on conceptual, technical and analytical skills than on problem solving, innovation, communication and entrepreneurial skills which are perceived to be most needed by employers, implying a relevance gap. What the MBA participants learnt does not correlate with what they perceived to be most needed by employers.

Research limitations/implications

Since the findings are based on perceptions of MBA participants, the conclusions drawn from these findings must be considered tentative and interpreted with care. Future research must include representative sample of all MBA stakeholders such as faculty, students, graduates, employers and administrators to get rich information about quality of inputs, processes and products of MBA programme.

Practical implications

There is strong need for the MBA programme to integrate traditional management and administrative skills with experiences and skills relevant for today's world of work. Bridging the growing theory‐practice gap requires attracting professors with practical business experience, revising staff recruitment policies and procedures, establishing formal partnership with external organization, and develop long‐term strategies to reduce teaching load and staff turnover.

Originality/value

Most of the studies on the relevance and quality of GBE programmes are conducted in western higher education institutions, very little has been done in African universities. This is the first of its kind in the context of Botswana, an important contribution to existing literature and foundation for further advanced studies in the area.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 26 April 2011

John Dalrymple

Abstract

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2011

Manjit Singh Sandhu, Shaufique Fahmi Sidique and Shoaib Riaz

Postgraduate students who are more mature and have greater job experience are more likely to be inclined towards entrepreneurship. However, postgraduate students face…

Abstract

Purpose

Postgraduate students who are more mature and have greater job experience are more likely to be inclined towards entrepreneurship. However, postgraduate students face various barriers such as lack of funds, fear of failure and lack of social networking that may hinder their entrepreneurial inclination. The barriers faced by these postgraduate students may also exhibit different dimensions compared with barriers faced by existing entrepreneurs. This study aims to examine the relationship between perceived barriers to entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial inclination.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a survey‐based methodology, data were collected from a sample of 267 postgraduate students from various Malaysian universities. Respondents' perception towards five barriers to entrepreneurship (aversion to risk, fear of failure, lack of resources, lack of social networking, and aversion to stress and hard work) and their entrepreneurial inclination were assessed.

Findings

The model R‐squared indicated that 31.5 percent of the variation in the entrepreneurial inclination is explained by the five perceived barriers. The highest ranked barrier to entrepreneurship was lack of social networking followed by lack of resources and aversion to risk.

Research limitations/implications

The findings in this study cannot be generalized to non‐student populations since it covers only postgraduate students. The quantitative approach used was unable to uncover in‐depth information on the various barriers. A qualitative approach may be more appropriate to obtain further details.

Originality/value

This research provides interesting insights into the entrepreneurship barriers faced by postgraduate students from a developing nation where such research is lacking.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 24 February 2012

Syed Zamberi Ahmad and Siri Roland Xavier

The purpose of this paper is to explore the entrepreneurial activities in Malaysia through determining some demographic characteristics, expert and individual perceptions…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the entrepreneurial activities in Malaysia through determining some demographic characteristics, expert and individual perceptions of Malaysian entrepreneurs, in addition to the environment for entrepreneurship, and to highlight Malaysia's entrepreneurial position internationally.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was drawn from country‐level data provided by the National Malaysia GEM (Global Entrepreneurship Monitor) to evaluate the current status of entrepreneurial environments in the country.

Findings

The findings show that the early stages of entrepreneurship development in Malaysia are very dynamic and volatile. The number of early‐stage entrepreneurial activities in Malaysia is still lower than in other parts of developing countries. Inadequate financial support, bureaucracy and inconsistency of government policies, lack of entrepreneurial education at tertiary level and inadequacy of entrepreneurial training are some of the important obstacles encountered by entrepreneurs in Malaysia. On the other hand, there are favourable entrepreneurial environmental conditions determined in this study that are promising: the physical infrastructures and services access towards entrepreneurship, and the financial environment related with entrepreneurship.

Practical implications

The results are also useful for optimising the local entrepreneurial environment, and are helpful for policy decision makers. Institutions need to be strengthened before entrepreneurial resources can be fully deployed.

Originality/value

This paper provides the Malaysian government with theoretical support so that the government can utilise limited resources to develop entrepreneurial activities.

Details

Journal of Chinese Entrepreneurship, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-1396

Keywords

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