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Zeger van der Wal

This qualitative interview study compares public value prioritizations of ministers, members of parliament and senior public managers in the Netherlands. This article aims…

Abstract

Purpose

This qualitative interview study compares public value prioritizations of ministers, members of parliament and senior public managers in the Netherlands. This article aims to answer the following central research question: how do Dutch political elites and administrative elites differ in their interpretation and prioritization of public values?

Design/methodology/approach

Based on coding and categorization of 65 interviews this article shows how government elites in advanced western democracies interpret and assess four crucial public values: responsiveness, expertise, lawfulness and transparency.

Findings

Political elites and administrative elites in the Netherlands are more similar than different in their prioritization and perceptions of public values. Differences are strongly related to role conceptions and institutional responsibilities, which are more traditional than most recent literature on politico-administrative dynamics would suggest.

Research limitations/implications

Our qualitative findings are hard to generalize to larger populations of politicians and public managers in the Netherlands, let alone beyond the Netherlands. However, the testable research hypotheses we derive from our explorative study merit future testing among larger populations of respondents in different countries through survey research.

Practical implications

Experienced values differences between both groups are smaller than their mutual perceptions would suggest.

Originality/value

Most research on public values is quantitative in nature and focuses exclusively on public managers. By adding the politician to the equation we improve our understanding of how public values are enacted in real life and set the tone for a more inclusive research agenda on public values.

Details

Public Value Management, Measurement and Reporting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-011-7

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Abstract

Details

Public Value Management, Measurement and Reporting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-011-7

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Article

Van Mô Dang, Patrice François, Pierre Batailler, Arnaud Seigneurin, Jean-Philippe Vittoz, Elodie Sellier and José Labarère

Medical record represents the main information support used by healthcare providers. The purpose of this paper is to examine whether patient perception of hospital care…

Abstract

Purpose

Medical record represents the main information support used by healthcare providers. The purpose of this paper is to examine whether patient perception of hospital care quality related to compliance with medical-record keeping.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors merged the original data collected as part of a nationwide audit of medical records with overall and subscale perception scores (range 0-100, with higher scores denoting better rating) computed for 191 respondents to a cross-sectional survey of patients discharged from a university hospital.

Findings

The median overall patient perception score was 77 (25th-75th percentiles, 68-87) and differed according to the presence of discharge summary completed within eight days of discharge (81 v. 75, p=0.03 after adjusting for baseline patient and hospital stay characteristics). No independent associations were found between patient perception scores and the documentation of pain assessment and nutritional disorder screening. Yet, medical record-keeping quality was independently associated with higher patient perception scores for the nurses’ interpersonal and technical skills component.

Research limitations/implications

First, this was a single-center study conducted in a large full-teaching hospital and the findings may not apply to other facilities. Second, the analysis might be underpowered to detect small but clinically significant differences in patient perception scores according to compliance with recording standards. Third, the authors could not investigate whether electronic medical record contributed to better compliance with recording standards and eventually higher patient perception scores.

Practical implications

Because of the potential consequences of poor recording for patient safety, further efforts are warranted to improve the accuracy and completeness of documentation in medical records.

Originality/value

A modest relationship exists between the quality of medical-record keeping and patient perception of hospital care.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article

Robert Nash, Ramya Srinivasan, Bruno Kenway and James Quinn

The purpose of this paper is to assess whether clinicians have an accurate perception of the preventability of their patients’ mortality. Case note review estimates that…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess whether clinicians have an accurate perception of the preventability of their patients’ mortality. Case note review estimates that approximately 5 percent of inpatient deaths are preventable.

Design/methodology/approach

The design involved in the study is a prospective audit of inpatient mortality in a single NHS hospital trust. The case study includes 979 inpatient mortalities. A number of outcome measures were recorded, including a Likert scale of the preventability of death- and NCEPOD-based grading of care quality.

Findings

Clinicians assessed only 1.4 percent of deaths as likely to be preventable. This is significantly lower than previously published values (p<0.0001). Clinicians were also more likely to rate the quality of care as “good,” and less likely to identify areas of substandard clinical or organizational management.

Research limitations/implications

The implications of objective assessment of the preventability of mortality are essential to drive quality improvement in this area.

Practical implications

There is a wide disparity between independent case note review and clinicians assessing the care of their own patients. This may be due to a “knowledge gap” between reviewers and treating clinicians, or an “objectivity gap” meaning clinicians may not recognize preventability of death of patients under their care.

Social implications

This study gives some insight into deficiencies in clinical governance processes.

Originality/value

No similar study has been performed. This has significant implications for the idea of the preventability of mortality.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article

Chantal Backman, Paul C. Hebert, Alison Jennings, David Neilipovitz, Omar Choudhri, Akshai Iyengar, Romain Rigal and Alan J. Forster

Patient safety remains a top priority in healthcare. Many organizations have developed systems to monitor and prevent harm, and have invested in different approaches to…

Abstract

Purpose

Patient safety remains a top priority in healthcare. Many organizations have developed systems to monitor and prevent harm, and have invested in different approaches to quality improvement. Despite these organizational efforts to better detect adverse events, efficient resolution of safety problems remains a significant challenge. The authors developed and implemented a comprehensive multimodal patient safety improvement program called SafetyLEAP. The term “LEAP” is an acronym that highlights the three facets of the program including: a Leadership and Engagement approach; Audit and feedback; and a Planned improvement intervention. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the implementation of the SafetyLEAP program in the intensive care units (ICUs) of three large hospitals.

Design/methodology/approach

A comparative case study approach was used to compare and contrast the adherence to each component of the SafetyLEAP program. The study was conducted using a convenience sample of three (n=3) ICUs from two provinces. Two reviewers independently evaluated major adherence metrics of the SafetyLEAP program for their completeness. Analysis was performed for each individual case, and across cases.

Findings

A total of 257 patients were included in the study. Overall, the proportion of the SafetyLEAP tasks completed was 64.47, 100, and 26.32 percent, respectively. ICU nos 1 and 2 were able to identify opportunities for improvement, follow a quality improvement process and demonstrate positive changes in patient safety. The main factors influencing adherence were the engagement of a local champion, competing priorities, and the identification of appropriate resources.

Practical implications

The SafetyLEAP program allowed for the identification of processes that could result in patient harm in the ICUs. However, the success in improving patient safety was dependent on the engagement of the care teams.

Originality/value

The authors developed an evidence-based approach to systematically and prospectively detect, improve, and evaluate actions related to patient safety.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article

Dirk F. de Korne, Jeroen D.H. van Wijngaarden, Cathy van Dyck, U. Francis Hiddema and Niek S. Klazinga

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the implementation of a broad-scale team resource management (TRM) program on safety culture in a Dutch eye hospital, detailing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the implementation of a broad-scale team resource management (TRM) program on safety culture in a Dutch eye hospital, detailing the program’s content and procedures. Aviation-based TRM training is recognized as a useful approach to increase patient safety, but little is known about how it affects safety culture.

Design/methodology/approach

Pre- and post-assessments of the hospitals’ safety culture was based on interviews with ophthalmologists, anesthesiologists, residents, nurses, and support staff. Interim observations were made at training sessions and in daily hospital practice.

Findings

The program consisted of safety audits of processes and (team) activities, interactive classroom training sessions by aviation experts, a flight simulator session, and video recording of team activities with subsequent feedback. Medical professionals considered aviation experts inspiring role models and respected their non-hierarchical external perspective and focus on medical-technical issues. The post-assessment showed that ophthalmologists and other hospital staff had become increasingly aware of safety issues. The multidisciplinary approach promoted social (team) orientation that replaced the former functionally-oriented culture. The number of reported near-incidents greatly increased; the number of wrong-side surgeries stabilized to a minimum after an initial substantial reduction.

Research limitations/implications

The study was observational and the hospital’s variety of efforts to improve safety culture prevented us from establishing a causal relation between improvement and any one specific intervention.

Originality/value

Aviation-based TRM training can be a useful to stimulate safety culture in hospitals. Safety and quality improvements are not single treatment interventions but complex socio-technical interventions. A multidisciplinary system approach and focus on “team” instead of “profession” seems both necessary and difficult in hospital care.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article

Sandra G. Leggat and Cathy Balding

The purpose of this paper is to review the implementation of seven components of quality systems (QSs) linked with quality improvement in a sample of Australian hospitals.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the implementation of seven components of quality systems (QSs) linked with quality improvement in a sample of Australian hospitals.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors completed a systematic review to identify QS components associated with measureable quality improvement. Using mixed methods, the authors then reviewed the current state of these QS components in a sample of eight Australian hospitals.

Findings

The literature review identified seven essential QS components. Both the self-evaluation and focus group data suggested that none of the hospitals had all of these seven components in place, and that there were some implementation issues with those components that were in use. Although board and senior executives could point to a large number of quality and safety documents that they felt were supporting a vision and framework for safe, high-quality care, middle managers and clinical staff described the QSs as compliance driven and largely irrelevant to their daily pursuit of safe, high-quality care. The authors also found little specific training in quality improvement for staff, lack of useful data for clinicians on the quality of care they provide and confusion about how organisational QSs work.

Practical implications

This study provides a clearer picture of why QSs are not yet achieving the results that boards and executives want to achieve, and that patients require.

Originality/value

This is the first study to explore the implementation of QSs in hospitals in-depth from the perspective of hospital staff, linking the findings to the implementation of QS component identified in the literature.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 31 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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