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1 – 10 of 21
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

Zane L. Berge

While distance education is on a fast growth curve currently, there are many barriers that must be overcome. The results reported here are from persons working in…

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Abstract

While distance education is on a fast growth curve currently, there are many barriers that must be overcome. The results reported here are from persons working in corporate organizations (n=448). Takes the perspective that various organizations are at different stages or levels of capabilities with regard to distance education. The research questions reported are: do distance educators in the corporate sector perceive different barriers depending upon the maturity of their organization’s capabilities in distance education; and as the organization’s distance education competency as a whole matures, will the overall number or intensity of perceived barriers to distance education be reduced? The evidence from the responses to this survey indicates that there is a relationship between an organization’s level of capability in distance education and the barriers to distance education reported by respondents for some but not all barriers. The analysis of this survey also supports the proposition that corporate trainers and educators perceive fewer, or less intense, barriers in organizations that are more capable delivering distance education.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Abstract

Details

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Zane Berge, Marie de Verneil, Nancy Berge, Linda Davis and Donna Smith

Organizations find it increasingly difficult to stay competitive in today’s global economy. Leaders in the workplace are using benchmarking, competency, competency models…

11726

Abstract

Organizations find it increasingly difficult to stay competitive in today’s global economy. Leaders in the workplace are using benchmarking, competency, competency models, and competency studies to help make human resource decisions, such as hiring, training, and promotions. In training and development (T&D), it is helpful for competencies to focus on knowledge, skills and/or abilities. But neither the field of T&D, nor competency within the field, is static. Reported here is a careful review of literature showing the trends in competency over the past three decades in the training and development field, and provides some speculation regarding competencies needed in the near future for professionals in T&D. Two of the most apparent changes in T&D are the shift to performance improvement and the use of technology. Thus the skills, knowledge, and abilities involving these areas will continue to become increasingly necessary for T&D professionals.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 23 May 2008

Daniel James Homitz and Zane L. Berge

The purpose of this article is to examine e‐mentoring as a way to sustain distance training and education.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to examine e‐mentoring as a way to sustain distance training and education.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes a framework for sustaining distance training and education by adding e‐mentoring (mentoring over the internet). It also explores the role of mentors, the benefits of the programs to the mentor and the sponsoring organizations, and ways of overcoming challenges faced by e‐mentoring in distance training and education.

Findings

One effective and cost‐effective way to monitor and improve the effectiveness of training and education in the workplace is to involve expert peers, subject matter experts, and managers in a mentoring or coaching capacity.

Originality/value

The article shows a cost‐effective way to monitor and improve the effectiveness of training and education in the workplace.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2011

Alex J. Autry and Zane Berge

This paper aims to review characteristics associated with digital natives and digital immigrants and explores selected research studies related to information and

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review characteristics associated with digital natives and digital immigrants and explores selected research studies related to information and communication technology. Some of the challenges facing the twenty‐first century in training and developing our future workforce are explored, along with the differences between generations that contribute to their personal learning and instructional styles.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the literature is combined with the authors' experience and the reporting of a survey on generational differences regarding perceived usefulness of technology in training programs.

Findings

A new digital language is evolving and is increasingly prevalent with technical savvy individuals as a normal means of communication, creating a communication lull between generations affecting both the digital natives and digital immigrants. This communication barrier extends beyond the casual day‐to‐day endeavors but reaches into learning environments. The survey indicated that the younger the respondent, the more favorable that person is to wanting technology in the learning environment.

Practical implications

In order for effective learning to occur both instructors and students must be able to match both instructional strategies and learning styles consistently. In addition, those who are responsible for aligning educational and learning strategies should meet the training and development programs being deployed. There is a need to examine possible rationale correlating with native and immigrant lifestyles that support their cognitive process. These processes relate to how natives and immigrants receive information and how it stimulates the brain to connect the inputs with previously learned data – how an individual's brain becomes “wired” to manipulate stored data to be used during problem‐solving and critical thinking activities in both life events and training sessions.

Originality/value

The paper explores whether individuals of the younger generation have more of a learning advantage or disadvantage compared to learners from an older generation. Exposure to new technologies strengthens the user's acceptance and knowledge of the digital product and may begin to acquaint them with other and future similar technological gadgets.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 43 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 October 2010

Carmen Abrams and Zane Berge

This paper aims to explore advantages, disadvantages, advice and concerns regarding workforce cross training practices, as well as examples of businesses and organizations…

3121

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore advantages, disadvantages, advice and concerns regarding workforce cross training practices, as well as examples of businesses and organizations that have successfully implemented cross training programs.

Design/methodology/approach

This article is a general review, based on the literature available and the knowledge and expertise of the authors.

Findings

There are a number of realities, such as increased training cost, questionable improvement in productivity, complexity of workflow, and employee resistance, that an employer must consider carefully before moving towards a cross training approach. At the same time, cross training can provide employees with learning and growth opportunities that can help them be ready for emergencies, recessions, and the competition of a global economy.

Originality/value

This article adds to the literature on workforce cross training and will be of interest to those involved in that field.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 22 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2009

Paz Susan Cabanero‐Johnson and Zane Berge

The purpose of this paper is to provide description and an analysis of two worlds colliding where real‐world roles or ideas play out in a virtual dimension. Inhabited by…

1352

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide description and an analysis of two worlds colliding where real‐world roles or ideas play out in a virtual dimension. Inhabited by digital natives, the virtual world in a learning organization is a journey back to the future of microworlds where the only limitation is one's imagination.

Design/methodology/approach

In 1990, when computer technology flexs its range of useful possibilities, Senge envisions its practical application in a learning organization. He purports the use of computer simulations which he calls microworlds, as a virtual sandbox for learning. His vision, is expanded today, means virtual worlds that co‐exist with the real world. Second life is an example of that virtual world. The possibilities for learning inherent in this virtual world seem limitless in a knowledge‐driven, global society hungry for the next creative and innovative way of transforming the world, real or virtual.

Findings

Digital natives are the drivers of change who will explore the brave new world of computer simulations. As simulations become more technologically infuse with artificial intelligence, its application for education and learning will broaden and expand. Unlike the static interface of a textbook, which shows limitations in content scope and delivery, this virtual world knows no limits in knowledge expansion. Validated course content, formal and informal knowledge contributions from peers and experts alike, networked knowledge coming from Web resources and the internet enrich the learner's ability beyond measure to experience the world and know it better and more intimately.

Practical implications

The emergent technology of virtual worlds utilizing simulations of real life work situations is a throwback to the microworlds of yesterday. They are ideal for conducting thought experiments that deepen with experiential understanding. This technology‐mediated form of learning affords the opportunity to experience the results of an action which may take a lifetime to learn in real time. This virtual world allows decision‐making but eliminates the risks of serious, unintended consequences. It is a wonderful resource for living vicariously experiences which are unavailable or unlikely in the real world.

Originality/value

Virtual simulations are useful for learning concepts, ideas, and assumptions that are difficult to perform or test in the physical dimension. Digital natives, people who were born in the 1980s, explore Second Life, and the paper discusses the value of this virtual world.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2008

Jeff Feiertag and Zane L. Berge

The purpose of this paper is to explore generational differences between Generation N (persons born 1980 and after) and previous generations with regard to teaching and learning.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore generational differences between Generation N (persons born 1980 and after) and previous generations with regard to teaching and learning.

Design/methodology/approach

This viewpoint article reviews selected literature, synthesizing those articles with opinions on how to approach Generation N for education and training.

Findings

Generation N students and employees possess certain key traits that translate into learning in school and the business world. Generation N employees are often not as independent as their predecessor generations requiring more structure, guidance and regular feedback. They prefer working collaboratively, do not respond well to the lecture, often do not communicate effectively by traditional standards, require information individually tailored to them, and require technology that is available to use. These characteristics of Gen Ns indicate that instructional designers in schools or the workplace should make appropriate adjustments when facilitating the new generation's learning.

Originality/value

With a rather widespread concern by educators and managers that today's graduates do not possess the critical thinking and other skills needed for the business world, this article lends a perspective on how to approach Generation N learners.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 50 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 16 February 2010

Kathryn Kane, Janine Robinson‐Combre and Zane L. Berge

While most practitioners and researchers agree that social networking is a tool for the masses to stay in touch, this paper aims to explore an untapped use for this medium

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Abstract

Purpose

While most practitioners and researchers agree that social networking is a tool for the masses to stay in touch, this paper aims to explore an untapped use for this medium in the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper gives the authors' viewpoint and relies on their experience and a review of literature.

Findings

There is a synergy between knowledge management and e‐learning through these social networking tools.

Practical implications

By incorporating knowledge management with social networking, organizations could have a new vehicle for e‐learning, allowing formal and informal information to flow along the “super highway”.

Originality/value

This paper shows that both knowledge management and e‐learning bring value to an organization and through the use of social networking, knowledge will no longer be confined to a certain group of individuals, but would allow an organization to learn from its most valuable asset – its employees.

Details

VINE, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2008

Zane L. Berge

This paper aims to explore these reasons regarding why it is difficult or perhaps impossible to properly evaluate the impact and effectiveness of workplace training.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore these reasons regarding why it is difficult or perhaps impossible to properly evaluate the impact and effectiveness of workplace training.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach taken is to describe the barriers to effectively measure training in the workplace.

Findings

The paper finds that, essentially, training sometimes lacks planning, sponsorship, budget, or because training is done for the wrong reasons. Evaluation of training is also difficult because operating unit managers are looking for increased performance and not necessarily the increased learning on which trainers usually judge the success of their training. Additionally, in almost all cases, the lack of performance is only partially due to the need for training. Even when training is needed, a deficit of skills and knowledge is often a small part – 15 percent‐20 percent perhaps – of the overall lack of performance. Training's effectiveness in helping to increase performance is reduced even further since training is often wasted because the skills and knowledge gained in training are not applied on the job and thus have no impact. Add to these things, the antiquated accounting methods used to measure and evaluate training, and it becomes easy to understand why evaluation of the impact training has within the organization is difficult.

Originality/value

Knowing the causes for difficulty in evaluating training in the workplace may help planners in this field to develop ways to overcome them.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 40 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

1 – 10 of 21