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Article

Zoe Radnor and Joe O'Mahoney

This paper reflects on the growing trend of engaging management consultancies in implementing operations management innovations in the public sector. Whilst the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper reflects on the growing trend of engaging management consultancies in implementing operations management innovations in the public sector. Whilst the differences between public and private sector operations have been documented, there is a dearth of material detailing the impact of public sector engagements on the consultancies themselves and the operations management products and services they develop. Drawing on qualitative data, the paper aims to identify both the impact of operations management in the public sector and the impact of this engagement on the consultancies that are involved.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on rich, qualitative data from six large management consultancies, amounting to over 48 interviews. An inductive methodology sought to identify both how consultancies have adapted their operations management products and services, and why.

Findings

The paper finds that the different context of the public sector provides consultants with considerable challenges when implementing operations management projects. The research shows that public services are often hampered by different cultures, structures, and managerial knowledge and investment patterns. Such constraints have an impact on both the projects being implemented and the relationship between consultants and clients.

Originality/value

There are few studies that consider the implementation of operations management in the public sector and fewer still which examine the impact of public sector engagement on the products that consultancies develop. This paper aims to develop understanding in both. At a more theoretical level, the paper contributes to considering operations management through knowledge management literature in seeking to understand how consumers of management knowledge influence its producers.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 33 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article

Kate Bell, Tony Kinder and Guro Huby

Rhetoric and reality lead separate lives when it comes to integrating health and social services in Scotland, and it is making planning and implementation difficult for…

Abstract

Rhetoric and reality lead separate lives when it comes to integrating health and social services in Scotland, and it is making planning and implementation difficult for practitioners of integration. This paper is a collaboration between a practitioner and two academics who teach, research and write about integration. It explores the views of other integration practitioners about the policy, language and nature of integration, and the issues practitioners are currently grappling with, especially how the policy language of ‘integration’ fails to connect with integration in practice. It appears that ‘integration’ has less to do with broad policy aspirations and principles of service (re)organisation, than with the specific aims, objectives and outcomes of individual projects delivered in very specific circumstances. Acknowledging the localisation of integration, and allowing the time for productive problem solving which can generate a new language, ought to be essential elements of integration.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article

Alex Douglas, Jacqueline Douglas and John Davies

The purpose of this paper is to report how a small, family‐owned children's play centre can achieve competitive advantage by developing a differentiated service. The aim…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report how a small, family‐owned children's play centre can achieve competitive advantage by developing a differentiated service. The aim is to show how this differentiation strategy is operationalized in a small family business using safety critical and work critical regulatory practices, and to examine their impact on operations and customers.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach was taken, collecting data through observation over a 24‐month period from design, through construction, to the first 18 months of operations. A survey of customers was undertaken after the centre had been open for 12 months.

Findings

From startup in 2005, the centre has attracted between 1,500 and 2,000 children per week. It charges premium admission prices (twice those of competitors) and also charges for accompanying adults. Customers travel up to 20 miles to the centre, extremely high customer satisfaction levels are achieved, over 99 per cent of customers would recommend the centre to others and repeat visits are the norm.

Research limitations/implications

The research covers a single case and therefore is only generalisable back to theory rather than to the population of free‐standing children's soft play area businesses.

Practical implications

When organizations within a particular industry sector operate within the confines of that industry's legal requirements, it is the voluntary practices that are likely to lead to differentiation of the service.

Originality/value

The paper provides a detailed case study on how a small family business achieves competitive advantage by utilising safety critical and work critical practices to strategically differentiate its service offering.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Book part

Mateusz Lewandowski

Performance management is the ‘Achilles heel’ of many reforms and public management practices and requires changes. Governance in general and co-production in particular…

Abstract

Performance management is the ‘Achilles heel’ of many reforms and public management practices and requires changes. Governance in general and co-production in particular impose an organizational setting which requires rethinking performance management, which is still conceptually embedded in New Public Management paradigm. This chapter builds on the latest co-production framework and service-dominant logic and outlines new challenges for rethinking performance measurement and management. It also discusses how public service design (PSD) may interact with them. As a result the need to shift between performance control loops has been emphasized, suggesting that service design may significantly support internal ex-nunc performance management. Although it should be facilitated in addressing some of the performance challenges, an outline of a framework for appropriate method has also been proposed.

Details

Cross-Sectoral Relations in the Delivery of Public Services
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-172-0

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Article

Sharon J. Williams and Zoe J. Radnor

Worldwide, healthcare systems struggle to sustain the delivery of services at a time of increasing demand, limited resources and growing expectations from users, coupled…

Abstract

Purpose

Worldwide, healthcare systems struggle to sustain the delivery of services at a time of increasing demand, limited resources and growing expectations from users, coupled with dealing with the aftermath of the Covid-19 pandemic and the threat of other outbreaks. There has never been a more important time to sustain innovation and improvements. Using an illustrative case, the authors assess the application of two existing frameworks to identify the key propositions and dimensions required to deliver sustainable services.

Design/methodology/approach

This illustrative case study focuses on a service provided by a chronic disease, multidisciplinary community healthcare team in the UK. Experienced-based interviews were conducted with health professionals, patients and relatives to provide a rich account of a care pathway design. A high-level process map is used to visualise the key touch points.

Findings

The authors identify all seven propositions of the SERVICE framework being present along with additional dimensions relating to sustaining innovation and improvement.

Research limitations/implications

This research is limited to a chronic disease care pathway. However, the authors believe the results could be applicable to other medical conditions, which are supported by a similar multi-disciplinary service delivery model.

Practical implications

The authors provide a sustainable public service operations SERVICES framework for health professionals and managers to consider when (re)designing care pathways.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the emerging discipline of public service operations research by empirically testing for the first time the SERVICE framework within healthcare. The authors have included additional factors associated with innovation and improvement and recommended further development of the framework to include factors, such as economic sustainability, highly relevant to the context of universal healthcare systems.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article

S. Al-Balushi, A.S. Sohal, P.J. Singh, A. Al Hajri, Y.M. Al Farsi and R. Al Abri

The purpose of this paper is to determine the readiness factors that are critical to the application and success of lean operating principles in healthcare organizations…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the readiness factors that are critical to the application and success of lean operating principles in healthcare organizations through a review of relevant literature.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive review of literature focussing on lean and lean healthcare was conducted.

Findings

Leadership, organizational culture, communication, training, measurement, and reward systems are all commonly attributed readiness factors throughout general change management and lean literature. However, directly related to the successful implementation of lean in healthcare is that a setting is able to authorize a decentralized management style and undertake an end-to-end process view. These can be particularly difficult initiatives for complex organizations such as healthcare settings.

Research limitations/implications

The readiness factors identified are based on a review of the published literature. The external validity of the findings could be enhanced if tested using an empirical study.

Practical implications

The readiness factors identified will enable healthcare practitioners to be better prepared as they begin their lean journeys. Sustainability of the lean initiative will be at stake if these readiness factors are not addressed.

Originality/value

To the best of the knowledge, this is the first paper that provides a consolidated list of key lean readiness factors that can guide practice, as well as future theory and empirical research.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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Article

Mia Ljungblom

– The purpose of this paper is to research the practice of ethics in Swedish health care organizations using Lean Management.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to research the practice of ethics in Swedish health care organizations using Lean Management.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study was conducted.

Findings

Findings indicate that ethics is not a consideration when hospitals are implementing Lean Management.

Social implications

Organizations generally have diverse value systems when building their codes of professional ethics for examining ethical principles, whereas Lean Management has established base principles with different codes of professional ethics differing from the intrinsic values humans create according to moral philosophy. It could be said that Lean Management relies on minimalistic ethic. While hospitals implement Lean Management, there are still many barriers to resolve to achieve useful implementation. Managing change while emphasizing ethical values could be a success factor for those organizations and their customers.

Originality/value

Studying ethical values in Lean Management implementation.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 6 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

Keywords

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Article

Mohamad Alnajem, Jose Arturo Garza-Reyes and Jiju Antony

The purpose of this paper is to develop a framework to assess the lean readiness within emergency departments (EDs) and identify the key quality practices deemed essential…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a framework to assess the lean readiness within emergency departments (EDs) and identify the key quality practices deemed essential for lean system (LS) implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

An extensive review of the lean healthcare literature was conducted, including LS implementation within the healthcare sector (both generally and in EDs), best ED quality practices, essential factors for LS implementation within healthcare and lean readiness assessment frameworks. The authors identified six main categories from a literature review (top management and leadership, human resources, patient relations, supplier relations, processes and continuous improvement (CI)), and validated these based on experts’ opinion.

Findings

Several factors were identified as crucial for EDs, including top management and leadership, human resources, patient relations, supplier relations, processes and CI.

Research limitations/implications

The framework has not yet been tested, which prevents the author from declaring it fit for EDs.

Practical implications

This framework will help ED managers determine the factors that will enable/hinder the implementation of LSs within their premises.

Originality/value

To the author’s knowledge, this is the first lean readiness assessment framework for EDs and one of the few lean readiness assessment frameworks in the literature.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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Article

Shilpa Shekhar Parkhi

The purpose of this paper is to synthesise the extent to which lean implementation in healthcare has been studied in the literature since its inception a decade ago.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to synthesise the extent to which lean implementation in healthcare has been studied in the literature since its inception a decade ago.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based upon a literature review of mostly academic articles published mainly in the fields of operations management and medicine.

Findings

The current state of the literature on lean healthcare implementation is primarily evaluative (benefits-oriented), descriptive (process-oriented) and rarely holistic (interaction of lean implementation and clinical practice).

Originality/value

This paper identifies further research directions for academics, and provides an overview of findings relevant to healthcare stakeholders interested in lean implementation.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article

Gareth H. Rees and Robin Gauld

The purpose of this paper is to review and discuss the effects of the introduction of lean into healthcare workplaces, phenomena that have not been widely investigated.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review and discuss the effects of the introduction of lean into healthcare workplaces, phenomena that have not been widely investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on discussions and findings from the literature. It seeks to bring the few geographically dispersed experiences and case studies together to draw some conclusions regarding lean’s negative effects.

Findings

Two recurring themes emerge. The first is there is little evidence of Lean’s impact on work and the people who perform it. The literature therefore suggests that we understand very little about how work conditions are changed and how Lean’s negative effects arise and may be managed in healthcare workplaces. A second observation is that Lean’s effects are ambiguous. For some Lean seems to intensify work, while for others it leads to improved job satisfaction and productivity. Given this variety, the paper suggests a research emphasis on Lean’s socio-cultural side and to derive more data on how work and its processes change, particularly in the context of healthcare team-working.

Originality/value

The paper concludes that without improved understanding of social contexts of Lean interventions its value for healthcare improvement may be limited. Future research should also include a focus on how the work is changed and whether high-performance work system practices may be used to offset Lean’s negative effects.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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