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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2020

Andrea Geissinger, Christofer Laurell, Christina Öberg, Christian Sandström, Nathalie Sick and Yuliani Suseno

Using the case of Foodora, this paper aims to assess the impact of technological innovation of an emerging actor in the sharing economy through stakeholders’ perceptions…

Abstract

Purpose

Using the case of Foodora, this paper aims to assess the impact of technological innovation of an emerging actor in the sharing economy through stakeholders’ perceptions in the market and non-market domains.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a methodological approach called social media analytics (SMA) to explore the case of Foodora, 3,250 user-generated contents in social media are systematically gathered, coded and analysed.

Findings

The findings indicate that, while Foodora appears to be a viable provider in the marketplace, there is mounting public concern about the working conditions of its employees. In the market domain, Foodora manages its status as an online delivery platform and provider well, but at the same time, it struggles with its position in the non-market sphere, suggesting that the firm is vulnerable to regulatory change. These insights highlight the importance of simultaneously exploring and balancing market and non-market perceptions when assessing the impact of disruptive innovation.

Originality/value

This study offers originality by providing an integrative approach to consider both the market and non-market domains. It is also novel in its use of SMA as a tool for knowledge acquisition and management to evaluate the impact of emerging technologies in the sharing economy.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 February 2020

Andrea Geissinger, Christofer Laurell, Christina Öberg, Christian Sandström and Yuliani Suseno

Digitally intermediated peer-to-peer exchanges have accelerated in occurrence, and as a consequence, they have introduced an increased pluralism of connotations…

Abstract

Purpose

Digitally intermediated peer-to-peer exchanges have accelerated in occurrence, and as a consequence, they have introduced an increased pluralism of connotations. Accordingly, this paper aims to assess user perceptions of the interplay between the sharing, access, platform, and community-based economies.

Design/methodology/approach

The sharing, access, platform, and community-based economies have been systematically tracked in the social media landscape using Social Media Analytics (SMA). In doing so, a total material of 62,855 publicly posted user-generated content concerning the four respective economies were collected and analyzed.

Findings

Even though the sharing economy has been conceptually argued to be interlinked with the access, platform, and community-based economies, the empirical results of the study do not validate this interlinkage. Instead, the results regarding user perceptions in social media show that the sharing, access, platform, and community-based economies manifest as clearly separated.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to existing literature by offering an empirical validation, as well as an in-depth understanding, of the sharing economy's interlinkage to other economies, along with the extent to which the overlaps between these economies manifest in social media.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 15 September 2021

Fang Zhao, Llandis Barratt-Pugh, Peter Standen, Janice Redmond and Yuliani Suseno

Drawing on social network and social capital literature, this study aims to explore how digital entrepreneurs utilize social networks to build their entrepreneurial…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on social network and social capital literature, this study aims to explore how digital entrepreneurs utilize social networks to build their entrepreneurial capability, creating and developing business ventures in a digitally networked society.

Design/methodology/approach

The study takes a qualitative approach, interviewing 35 digital entrepreneurs with businesses operating across multiple industry sectors in Western Australia.

Findings

The findings suggest that structural social capital provides a key resource with groups of relational contacts who facilitate in building entrepreneur capability, the venture and customer markets. Relational social capital provides a foundation of trust between entrepreneurs and social network members that is strategically important for digital entrepreneurship (DE). Cognitive social capital provides mechanisms to form relationships based on shared values across social networks.

Research limitations/implications

The study produces early evidence that in a multiplexed networking world, social capital accrual and use online is different from that of off-line. More empirical studies are needed to understand the complexity of the changing nature of online and off-line social networks, the consequential social capital and their interdependence in DE.

Practical implications

This is an exploratory qualitative study using a limited sample of 35 Australian digital entrepreneurs to explore the impact of social network interaction on digital entrepreneurs and their ventures, with the purpose of stimulating a social network approach when studying DE. This study confirms the critical importance of entrepreneurial social networks in the digital age and provides empirical evidence that online networks foster business development, while off-line networks feed self-development.

Originality/value

The study contributes to current research on DE as a dedicated new research stream of entrepreneurship. Specifically, the study contributes to a greater understanding of how digital entrepreneurs leverage social networks in today's digitally connected society.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2021

Andrea Geissinger, Christofer Laurell, Christina Öberg, Christian Sandström and Yuliani Suseno

This article explores the various stakeholders' perceptions of the ways digital work is organised within the sharing economy and the social implications of the…

Abstract

Purpose

This article explores the various stakeholders' perceptions of the ways digital work is organised within the sharing economy and the social implications of the transformation of work.

Design/methodology/approach

Applying social media analytics (SMA) concerning the sharing economy platform Foodora, a total of 3,251 user-generated content was collected and organised throughout the social media landscape in Sweden over 12 months, and 18 stakeholder groups were identified, discussing digital work within seven thematic categories.

Findings

The results show that the stakeholder groups in the Swedish context primarily expressed negative views of Foodora's way of organising digital work. The social media posts outlined the distributive and procedural justice related to the working conditions, boycott and protests and critical incidents, as well as the collective bargaining of Foodora.

Originality/value

By utilising a novel SMA method, this study contributes to the extant literature on the sharing economy by providing a systematic assessment concerning the impact of the sharing economy platform on the transformation of work and the associated social consequences.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 12 June 2020

Yuliani Suseno, Ely Susanto and Damita Lachman Sherwani

Drawing on social exchange theory, we consider mentoring in Indonesia in terms of practices and challenges. Characterized by high power distance, mentoring in Indonesia is…

Abstract

Drawing on social exchange theory, we consider mentoring in Indonesia in terms of practices and challenges. Characterized by high power distance, mentoring in Indonesia is formal, with certain performance criteria set by the organization for the selection of mentors. While the extent of formality differs depending on the organizational culture, mentoring is perceived to consist of relationship building that goes beyond a superior–subordinate relationship. Preliminary findings of this study also indicate several challenges in the mentoring relationship, one being the expectation to conform and the consequent punishment if one were to disobey orders. Another challenge is the lack of training for the mentors. Participants further noted the challenge associated with gift-giving practices whereby mentees are often obliged to give gifts to the mentors, given the high power distance context. Furthermore, obtaining continuous commitment from top leaders poses another challenge. We also discuss theoretical and practical implications of this study for mentoring, leadership and employee development, thus adding to the literature on workplace mentoring in an emerging economy.

Details

Mentorship-driven Talent Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-691-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2009

Ashly H. Pinnington, Ken Kamoche and Yuliani Suseno

The aim of this paper is to understand the competitive and collaborative relations existing between people practising in the same professional occupation, but working…

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to understand the competitive and collaborative relations existing between people practising in the same professional occupation, but working within different organisation contexts of employment.

Design/methodology/approach

An interview study of 42 in‐house and external lawyers is reported and set within contexts of the knowledge management and internationalisation of legal services. The data are analysed from an appropriation‐learning perspective and then discussed for the extent that these two groups make similar claims to property in work.

Findings

The in‐house lawyers give highest priority to the protection of resources and knowledge and aim to achieve it through trust in work relationships and by sharing, diffusing and controlling knowledge. By contrast, issues concerning individual reward and empowerment were seen as lower priority. External lawyers attach similar importance to knowledge sharing, its diffusion and control, but have slightly less concern for protecting knowledge and resources. They place less emphasis on trust and seem to value empowerment through legal innovation more so than do the in‐house lawyers.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should be conducted on occupational and sub‐groups of knowledge workers to understand more systematically the dynamics of knowledge management, and the opportunities and constraints it creates for employees' property in work.

Originality/value

The research contributes to the literature on employees' property claims in work. It reflects on the extent that individuals' work identities must systematically adapt to different organisation contexts and approaches to knowledge management.

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Marie Dasborough, Peter Lamb and Yuliani Suseno

The authors explore employees’ emotions during a structural change (merging departments) in the higher education sector. The purposes of this paper are to identify how…

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3467

Abstract

Purpose

The authors explore employees’ emotions during a structural change (merging departments) in the higher education sector. The purposes of this paper are to identify how employees’ perceptions shape their emotional responses toward organizational change; and the variation of collective employee emotions pre-merger and post-merger.

Design/methodology/approach

This interpretative study uses phenomenography to better understand the phenomena of change.

Findings

Employees perceived their experiences as being promising (an opportunity to look forward to), threatening (a threat to be carefully managed) or inevitable (unavoidable). Emotional responses are collective, with male/older/more senior respondents experiencing different emotions as compared to others.

Research limitations/implications

This study is exploratory and is limited by small sample size, location and temporal specificity.

Practical implications

Managers should recognize that employees’ experiences of change are perceived quite differently and therefore should not simply be lumped together as one homogenous group. This knowledge can be used to facilitate the change process by better managing employees’ emotions to achieve positive outcomes.

Originality/value

Investigating emotions through an interpretive lens highlights new areas for improvement in the change management process. The authors are able to better understand why people are feeling positively or negatively toward organizational change and how and why their emotions shift over time.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Vanessa Ratten and Yuliani Suseno

The purpose of this paper is to elucidate information on what creates the different types of knowledge.

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2711

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to elucidate information on what creates the different types of knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

In the conceptual model it is argued that the concept of social capital provides an interesting view on the creation of market‐specific and firm‐specific knowledge.

Findings

The major finding from the paper is that knowledge is an important by‐product of an alliance forming process, a process commonly termed as alliance learning.

Research limitations/implications

Both market‐specific and firm‐specific knowledge have implications on two main types of alliance learning, that of mutual and non‐mutual learning.

Practical implications

Alliance managers need to be aware that knowledge is a key driver as well as a beneficial outcome in the formation of alliances.

Originality/value

This paper examines how the different types of knowledge evolve and how these different types of knowledge impact upon alliance learning.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 March 2021

Tugrul Daim, Marina Dabic and Edwin Garces

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330

Abstract

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Abstract

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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