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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2014

Yuki W.K. Lam and Rachel W.Y. Yee

Over the years, it has been without doubt that appearance consciousness is the privilege of women. In the past two decades, gender has become equivocal due to the…

Abstract

Over the years, it has been without doubt that appearance consciousness is the privilege of women. In the past two decades, gender has become equivocal due to the diffusion of sexual boundaries. This has induced changes in male consciousness on fashion. However, there has been limited research that investigates the antecedents and consequences of fashion consciousness. This research aims to explore the potential factors that influence fashion consciousness and their impacts on the buying intention and behavior of men. We have conducted an empirical study on Generation Y male fashion consumers in Hong Kong. Our findings show that advancement of information technology, self-identity ambiguity, changing work practices of men, and media influence are four key factors that affect male fashion consciousness. Our results also reveal that fashion consciousness has a positive impact on the buying intention and behaviors of men. We recommend that fashion retailers allocate organizational resources on advertising and promotions to attract the interest of men towards their products

Details

Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1560-6074

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Book part
Publication date: 16 August 2021

Abstract

Details

Intercultural Management in Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-827-0

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Yuntao Bai, Peter Harms, Guohong (Helen) Han and Wenwen Cheng

This study aims to introduce a new cognitive style, dialectical thinking, to demonstrate how it can influence a leader’s impact on team conflict and employee performance…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to introduce a new cognitive style, dialectical thinking, to demonstrate how it can influence a leader’s impact on team conflict and employee performance. Specifically, this study intends to answer the research questions “whether and how leader’s dialectical thinking would influence employee performance” with conflict management perspective in the Chinese context.

Design/methodology/approach

Multilevel structural equation modeling was used to test the theoretical model with 222 employees in 43 teams from Chinese high-tech manufacturing firms.

Findings

The authors found that the leader’s dialectical thinking had positive relationships with employee creativity and in-role performance and that the relationships were mediated by the leader’s conflict management approach and team conflict in sequence.

Practical implications

Selecting, recruiting or promoting of leaders with a dialectical thinking style or providing training to enhance leaders’ dialectical thinking is important for facilitating team conflict management and employee performance.

Originality/value

This is the first empirical paper to introduce dialectical thinking into the leadership, conflict and employee performance literatures.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Kristina Haberstroh, Ulrich R. Orth, Tatiana Bouzdine-Chameeva, Justin Cohen, Armando Maria Corsi, Roberta Crouch and Renata De Marchi

Extending research on cultural differences in aesthetic appreciation, the purpose of this paper is to show how a more interdependent self-construal, a cultural and…

Abstract

Purpose

Extending research on cultural differences in aesthetic appreciation, the purpose of this paper is to show how a more interdependent self-construal, a cultural and individual difference variable related to one’s social self, impacts the influence of visual harmony on consumer evaluations of marketing artifacts’ attractiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were obtained via three studies from a total of 1,498 consumers in Australia, Brazil, China, France, Germany, and Italy. Marketing visuals included the design of products, packages, typefaces, and logos. Self-construal was both measured and manipulated.

Findings

The results indicate that a person’s self-construal moderates the effect of visual harmony on attractiveness. Specifically, the positive effect of visual harmony on attractiveness – through self-congruity – is more pronounced with consumers possessing a more interdependent self-construal, and with products that are more hedonic than utilitarian.

Practical implications

Given the pivotal role attractiveness has in influencing consumer behavior, understanding what differences, at the individual and cultural levels, impact the harmony-attractiveness relationship helps marketers to better match the visual design of marketing stimuli to target audiences.

Originality/value

This study is among the first to show how the social-self impacts consumer response to marketing visuals. Further, value stems from adopting a holistic perspective on design, clarifying the process mechanism, and identifying boundary conditions.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2021

Mariela Golik and Maria Rita Blanco

This empirical study aims to analyse the talent spotters' perception of their tendency to be homophilic in the talent identification process and their stance on it…

Abstract

Purpose

This empirical study aims to analyse the talent spotters' perception of their tendency to be homophilic in the talent identification process and their stance on it. Besides, this article examines the type of homophily and the homophily attributes involved.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a qualitative design, 37 middle and senior line managers, working for two Argentine conglomerates in six Latin American countries, participated in the study. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews.

Findings

Homophily was perceived by most of talent spotters, who judged it as natural, while it was not perceived by a small group of the interviewees. In addition, among those who recognized its presence, another group advocated the homophilic advantages, while a final one admitted the presence of homophily and its negative implications. In addition, a variety of homophily attributes were identified; most of them within the value category. We posit that if homophily attributes are, at the same time, components of high potential models, homophily will constitute a functional bias to the talent identification process.

Originality/value

This is the first study that explores the talent spotters' perception of their homophily bias as well as the diversity of homophily attributes present in the talent identification process. This research highlights the relevance of the homophily attributes' analysis, taking into account its alignment to the potential model in order to improve the talent identification process.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 18 August 2021

Sujit Kumar Ray and Sangeeta Sahney

This study aims to obtain an understanding of the impact of personal cultural orientation on potential consumers’ intention toward the purchase of high-involvement green…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to obtain an understanding of the impact of personal cultural orientation on potential consumers’ intention toward the purchase of high-involvement green products, specifically, electric two-wheelers in India, which is one of the largest emerging markets of the world.

Design/methodology/approach

A self-administered questionnaire comprising a total of 30 items was administered over a sample of 582 respondents. The structural equation modeling using partial least square was used to analyze the relative impact of different cultural dimensions on consumers’ green purchase intention. Geert Hofstede’s typology of culture was used to represent personal cultural orientation and four of the five dimensions, namely, collectivism, long-term orientation (LTO), masculinity and uncertainty avoidance were studied.

Findings

Findings of the study revealed that collectivism, LTO and masculinity appear to be significant cultural dimensions that influence Indian consumers’ intention to purchase electric two-wheelers. Collectivism is the most influential dimension, followed by LTO and masculinity.

Research limitations/implications

This study helps in expanding literature in the area of green purchase by providing insight on how consumers’ individual cultural orientation influences their purchase of eco-friendly products such as electric two-wheelers.

Practical implications

The findings of the study offer insights, which can be useful for marketers in developing various promotional strategies, as consumers’ cultural values have significant implications for decisions with respect to the advertisement content.

Originality/value

This study illustrates the relative impact of different dimensions of national culture (measured at consumers’ personal level) on consumers’ green purchase intention. Such a study appears to be important in extending current knowledge on green purchase behavior in one of the largest emerging markets such as India.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2019

Shintaro Okazaki, Charles R. Taylor, Patrick Vargas and Jörg Henseler

An unconscious concern regarding one’s inevitable death, known as mortality salience, may affect consumers’ brand choices in the aftermath of disastrous events, such as…

Abstract

Purpose

An unconscious concern regarding one’s inevitable death, known as mortality salience, may affect consumers’ brand choices in the aftermath of disastrous events, such as earthquakes. The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of self-identification with global consumer culture (IDGCC) in global brand purchase intention in response to disasters that heighten mortality salience. The roles of materialism, consumer ethnocentrism, cosmopolitanism and hope in this this process are also explored.

Design/methodology/approach

An online experiment was conducted with a large sample of Japanese consumers. Japan was selected because it had recently suffered from a series of devastating earthquakes. Participants’ mortality salience was primed with an earthquake scenario. All measures were adapted from prior research. The authors used structural equation modeling to test the hypotheses and validate the model.

Findings

The results reveal that IDGCC is a direct predictor of global brand purchase intention when mortality salience is high. It appears that identifying with global consumer culture and buying global brands enhances self-esteem and reduces anxiety for those with high IDGCC. As predicted, materialism and cosmopolitanism positively influence IDGCC, whereas consumer ethnocentrism does not impede IDGCC. Hope directly and positively affects global brand purchase intention.

Research limitations/implications

Some consumers who experience traumatic events may resist mortality salience and experience a heightened sense of global citizenship. Meanwhile, those with lower IDGCC may revert to in-group favoritism, whereas those with higher IDGCC tend to purchase global brands. Using a scenario to simulate the mental state evoked by a disaster limits generalizability.

Practical implications

The findings illuminate how firms should modify their international marketing strategies in the face of traumatic global events when targeting consumers with high vs low IDGCC in terms of framing messages about global brands. Additionally, using global brands that emphasize an optimistic outlook may help global marketers capture attention from consumers high in IDGCC.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to address traumatic events and hope, relating these concepts to IDGCC and global brand purchase intention in an international marketing context.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2012

Lien Le Monkhouse, Bradley R. Barnes and Ute Stephan

The paper aims to further extend our understanding by assessing the extent to which two prominent cultural values in East Asia i.e. face saving and group orientation drive…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to further extend our understanding by assessing the extent to which two prominent cultural values in East Asia i.e. face saving and group orientation drive consumers’ perceptions of luxury goods across four East Asian markets.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi‐methods research approach was adopted consisting of: an expert panel of close to 70 participants, group discussions with five extended East Asian families, personal interviews with eight East Asian scholars, a pilot test with over 50 East Asian graduate students and a multi‐market survey of 443 consumer respondents in Beijing, Tokyo, Singapore and Hanoi.

Findings

The authors extend previous conceptual studies by empirically investigating the impact of these two cultural values on the perception of luxury among East Asian societies. Specifically the study reveals that across all four markets face saving has the strongest influence on the conspicuous and hedonistic dimensions of luxury, group orientation meanwhile is the strongest predictor of the quality, extended self and exclusivity dimensions of luxury. Collectively these two cultural values significantly influence East Asian perceptions of luxury. Overall, the findings reiterate the importance of understanding different cultural values and their influence across different East Asian societies.

Practical implications

The findings have important implications for managers of western luxury branded goods that are seeking to penetrate East Asian markets or seek to serve East Asian consumers. Specifically, to assist with developing suitable brand positioning, products, services, communications and pricing strategies.

Originality/value

This study contributes to our understanding of the subject by exploring the impact of face saving and group orientation on the perception of luxury goods across four East Asian countries. Several directions for future research are suggested.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

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