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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2020

Huong Le, Catrina Palmer Johnson and Yuka Fujimoto

This article examines a climate for inclusion through the lens of organizational justice. We argue that open interpersonal contacts, the fair treatment of gender-diverse…

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Abstract

Purpose

This article examines a climate for inclusion through the lens of organizational justice. We argue that open interpersonal contacts, the fair treatment of gender-diverse employees, and inclusive decision-making processes in the promotion of equitable employment practices are foundational for shaping the climate for inclusion.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative data were collected from multi sources: focus groups with female employees (N = 20) and interviews with male and female managers (N = 8).

Findings

In examining the similarities and differences between employees' and managers' perspectives, the findings revealed that, in all dimensions of a climate for inclusion, employees had more negative justice concerns than did managers, while managers and employees had similar views on some aspects of employment practices.

Research limitations/implications

This study was conducted within one university setting; therefore, the findings may not be applicable to other industries.

Practical implications

This study offers managerial implications that can be developed to promote the climate for inclusion in organizations.

Social implications

In order to create a fair and equitable workplace, all employees should be able to actively participate in decision-making processes and share suggestions for contextualized and fair employment practices.

Originality/value

Drawing the group-value model, this study advocates the importance of justice-based organizational practices in building an inclusive organization.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 50 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 May 2018

Huong Le, Zhou Jiang, Yuka Fujimoto and Ingrid Nielsen

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating roles of procedural justice and distributive justice in the organizational inclusion-affective well-being relationship.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating roles of procedural justice and distributive justice in the organizational inclusion-affective well-being relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 253 Australian employees using an online survey. The study used confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling to analyze the data.

Findings

Organizational inclusion was positively related to both distributive justice and procedural justice. The relationship between organizational inclusion and affective well-being was mediated by both distributive justice and procedural justice.

Research limitations/implications

The cross-sectional design may have limited the empirical inferences; however, the proposed model was based on robust theoretical contentions, thus mitigating the limitation of the design. Data were collected from a single organization, thus limiting generalizability.

Practical implications

Implementation of inclusion training activities at organizational, group, and individual levels is important to enhance perceptions of organizational inclusion and subsequently improve employee affective well-being.

Originality/value

Based on the group engagement model and group-value model of justice, this paper adds to the literature by demonstrating two mediating mechanisms driving the organizational inclusion-affective well-being relationship.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 47 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Le Huong, Connie Zheng and Yuka Fujimoto

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between employee perceived well-being and the four dimensions of organisational justice, namely, procedural, distributive…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between employee perceived well-being and the four dimensions of organisational justice, namely, procedural, distributive, interpersonal and informational justice, and how dimensions of organisational justice affect employee well-being in the Australian tourism industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample is selected from employees who work in the tourism industry in Australia, and the survey was conducted online (n=121). Factor analysis is used to identify key items related to perceived organisational justice, followed by multiple regression analysis to assess the magnitude and strength of impacts of different dimensions of organisational justice on employee well-being.

Findings

The results support the established view that organisational justice is associated with employee well-being. Specifically, informational justice has the strongest influence on tourism employee well-being, followed by procedural justice, interpersonal justice and distributive justice.

Research limitations/implications

The authors acknowledge key limitations in the study such as a relatively small sample size and gender imbalance in the sample.

Practical implications

The authors provide strategies for managers to increase levels of organisational justice in the tourism sector such as workgroup interactions, a consultation process, team culture and social support.

Originality/value

This study builds on limited literature in the area of inclusion and organisational justice in tourism organisations. The study provides a new path to effective organisational management within the context of a diverse workforce, adding to the current debate on which dimensions of organisational justice contribute to improving employee well-being.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 37 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 June 2023

Vui-Yee Koon and Yuka Fujimoto

Organizations that prioritize humanistic responsibility create an environment of value for their employees as the most important stakeholders. However, despite the numerous…

Abstract

Purpose

Organizations that prioritize humanistic responsibility create an environment of value for their employees as the most important stakeholders. However, despite the numerous corporate social responsibility (CSR) models and research highlighting stakeholder considerations, the long-standing “social” aspect of CSR has inhibited its humanism responsibility. In response, this study proposes to move beyond the antecedents and outcomes of CSR to explore how perceived CSR can promote its humanistic responsibility both inside and outside of organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors followed Sendjaya et al. (2008) ’s methodology for developing and validating the perceived corporate humanistic responsibility (CHR) scale. Study 1 validated the CHR's content. Study 2 established the measure’ reliability, internal consistency, unidimensionality and discriminant validity. The authors describe each of the studies in the forthcoming sections.

Findings

This research has produced a comprehensive set of perceived CHR items for business leaders based on earlier CHR/humanism concepts. Through the deconstruction of CHR theory, the granular conceptualization provides employee-centric workplaces, healthy internal communication, holistic compensation, CSR-committed behaviors and holistic training and development, equipped to assess how their CHR fosters humanistic workplaces that encourage socially responsible behaviors. This, in turn, would have an immense impact on employee well-being that, in turn, flourishes societal well-being.

Research limitations/implications

Although the perceived CHR scale's psychometric properties were confirmed using multiple tests ranging from qualitative to quantitative studies, this newly developed scale requires further investigation to explore whether internal or external relevance factors affect organizations' humanistic responsibility.

Practical implications

CSR is about caring for humans and the planet. The authors have unpacked what and how the human side of CSR operates for business leaders to advance their CHR practices and responsible management learning. The perceived CHR dimensions can guide business leaders to promote multidimensional humanistic behaviors inside and outside workplaces that transcend how to strengthen the humanistic responsibility behaviors of corporations to promote CHR by articulating how the “Social” aspect of CSR ought to function for employee well-being first.

Social implications

This study responds to Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) most aligned with the SDG 3 (good health and well-being) and SDG 8 (decent work and economic growth) by promoting humanistic workplaces with implications for United Nation's Principles for Responsible Management that encourages universities to educate students on humanism concepts in business management.

Originality/value

The originality lies in the empirical study of CHR. By incorporating the original concepts of humanism/humanistic management and CHR, the authors empirically articulate how CHR may be practically implemented as an elaborated humanistic synthesis for corporations.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 March 2020

Debjani Ghosh, Tomoki Sekiguchi and Yuka Fujimoto

The purpose of this paper is to develop an additional perspective on when and why intrinsic motivation predicts employee engagement by presenting a contextual boundary of…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop an additional perspective on when and why intrinsic motivation predicts employee engagement by presenting a contextual boundary of psychological detachment in relation to the relationship between intrinsic motivation, employee creativity and employee engagement of workers.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 288 full-time Japanese workers using an online survey. The study used a bootstrap method (Preacher and Hayes, 2008) to test mediation, and a Hayes method (2013) to test moderation and a first-stage moderated mediation model.

Findings

Employee creativity mediated the relationship between intrinsic motivation and employee engagement, and the relationship between intrinsic motivation and creativity was moderated by psychological detachment. Additionally, the indirect effect of intrinsic motivation on employee engagement via creativity was moderated by psychological detachment.

Research limitations/implications

The cross-sectional design may have limited the empirical inferences; however, the proposed model was based on robust theoretical contentions, and the study included an unrelated “marker variable” (neuroticism) as an effective means of identifying common method variance (CMV), thus mitigating the limitation of the design.

Practical implications

This study has shown that intrinsically motivated employees who practice psychological detachment from work achieve higher creativity and stronger employee engagement.

Originality/value

Based on the unconscious thought theory (UTT), job demand resource theory (JD-R), recovery processes (i.e. effort-recovery model) and self-determination theory (SDT), this paper adds to the literature by demonstrating the mediating and moderating mechanisms driving intrinsic motivation and employee engagement relationship.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 49 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 June 2020

Yuka Fujimoto and Mohammad Jasim Uddin

The theory building of inclusive workplace is still in its early stages, particularly concerning the inclusion of the poor in the developing countries. Through the exploration of…

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Abstract

Purpose

The theory building of inclusive workplace is still in its early stages, particularly concerning the inclusion of the poor in the developing countries. Through the exploration of social entrepreneurial inclusion, this study extends the inclusive workplace theory by featuring the inclusive dynamism of organizations for the poor in developing countries.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach was selected, as the goal of this study is to build on the theory in an under-researched area. This qualitative study is described as theory elaboration as it expands upon theoretical links that have received little attention among workforce diversity scholars.

Findings

We have established a conceptual framework of social entrepreneurial inclusion, which encompasses the following normative themes: organizational perspective for promoting social equality, empowering relationships, a sense of inclusion, organizational access to valuable resources and empowered inclusion.

Research limitations/implications

Although we have taken an exploratory qualitative approach and made efforts to report our data neutrally, we acknowledge that the ethical and theoretical positions taken in analyzing the data may have influenced the outcome of this research and, therefore, our findings can never be truly objective. We also acknowledge that this study was conducted in developing countries, thus the poor inclusive workplace model is not generalizable for the poor in developed countries due to different institutional and ecological settings.

Practical implications

We have illustrated the importance of business leaders leveraging the opportunities in the space between interdependency of individuals and organizations through doing well by doing good. Poor-inclusive workplaces need business leaders who can demonstrate the effective interpersonal skills to develop constructive and personalized relationships with the workers, the family and community members to encourage the idea that the poor be included in the workplace.

Social implications

The findings from this study also infer how corporations may collaborate with SEs and humanitarian agencies for inclusive growth so they can simultaneously unleash economic value and social value to develop more effective poor-inclusive business models in both sectors. Social entrepreneurs (SEs) and humanistic agencies tend to have situated knowledge of the poor in terms of locally embedded needs and knowledge of the community that corporations do not have.

Originality/value

This paper promotes the integrative workplace models of inclusion where inclusion of poor is empowered through involvement of multiple parties inside and outside workplaces. The empowered inclusion outcomes are strengthened through organizational access to valuable resources at the institutional level.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 39 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 September 2022

Mohammad Jasim Uddin, Fara Azmat, Yuka Fujimoto and Farhad Hossain

Despite considerable research and constant pressure from global media, exploitation has been a persistent problem in the Bangladeshi ready-made garment (RMG) supply chain. Yet…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite considerable research and constant pressure from global media, exploitation has been a persistent problem in the Bangladeshi ready-made garment (RMG) supply chain. Yet, the root causes of how and why exploitation still persists remain unexplored. This paper explores the reasons underlying the existence of exploitation in the RMG supply chain of Bangladesh using the theoretical lens of responsible capitalism.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on 98 interviews conducted at multiple levels of the RMG supply chain ecosystem, site visits, observation and archives, the authors unpack the underlying reasons for the existence of exploitation in Bangladeshi RMG supply chain.

Findings

Using the theoretical lens of responsible capitalism, the findings suggest the existence of exploitation as a multifaceted yet nuanced phenomenon that is a result of complex power dynamics, interdependency and interconnectedness of players at multiple levels of the supply chain. The authors extend responsible capitalism theory by adding local context as a key determinant for the RMG supply chain to be responsive, effective and sustainable. The authors further argue the need for a new business model in global supply chain that calls for a fundamental shift of businesses towards responsible capitalism via transformative actions at multiple levels for balancing power in relationships, generate profit with ethical integrity and take responsibility of the consequences of their actions.

Research limitations/implications

The authors use a contextualized case study of the RMG supply chain in Bangladesh using a critical realist approach. Although the use of contextualized case study has enabled better understanding of causal relationships between management practices and exploitation in the local context of Bangladesh, a quantitative approach to establish causality between different factors could be the focus of future research. The findings are specific to the context of Bangladeshi RMG supply chain and may have limited generalizability in other contexts. Further studies may build upon the findings to explore exploitation in RMG supply chain of other sectors and countries in the region and compare the findings to develop comprehensive understanding about the root causes of exploitation.

Practical implications

The findings call for a fundamental shift of business towards responsible capitalism via transformative actions of multiple players across different levels of the supply chains with managerial implications.

Originality/value

By drawing on empirical research, the authors provide a holistic perspective of responsible capitalism that is influenced by interactions and interconnectedness of players in multiple levels of the supply chain. The authors expand the responsible capitalism theory by adding local context as a key determinant that need to be considered for supply chains to be responsive, effective and sustainable.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 February 2023

Ismail Khan, Yuka Fujimoto, Muhammad Jasim Uddin and Muhammad Asim Afridi

This study aims to examine sustainability reporting through the lens of global reporting initiative (GRI) standards in developing economies, particularly in Pakistan, from the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine sustainability reporting through the lens of global reporting initiative (GRI) standards in developing economies, particularly in Pakistan, from the perspective of stakeholder theory, legitimacy theory, and system theory.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative and quantitative analyses on economic, social and environmental areas of sustainability reporting based on the GRI standards are applied across 57 organizations listed on the Pakistan stock exchange over the years 2016–2020.

Findings

The results from the content analysis and descriptive statistics show that overall sustainability reporting increased persistently over time and limited organizations disclose economic, social and environmental sustainability based on GRI standards. Moreover, the result from the two-tailed correlation analysis shows positive relations between economic, social and environmental sustainability reporting.

Research limitations/implications

Following the GRI standards, the regulators, government and policymakers need to assess the sustainability reporting based on GRI standards to improve corporate operations' transparency, stakeholder trust and legitimacy. The organizations should move beyond the compliance of regulatory norms and adopt the globally accepted sustainability GRI standards to improve sustainability reporting. The same kind of sustainability reporting is also advised for other countries with similar backgrounds and sustainability challenges.

Social implications

The integrated sustainability reporting framework based on GRI standards enables the organizations to work as a system of interconnected economic, social and environmental sustainability to resolve the issue of sustainability reporting, ensure the trust of multiple stakeholders and legitimize their business operations in society.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors' knowledge and thorough review of literature, this is the first study that examines the sustainability reporting based on GRI in the developing country of Pakistan to extend the findings of previous studies from conventional sustainability reporting to the globally accepted GRI based sustainability reporting. Using system theory, this study provides an additional contribution to the consideration concerning sustainability reporting based on GRI standards in the context of Pakistan.

Details

International Journal of Law and Management, vol. 65 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-243X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Yuka Fujimoto and Charmine E.J. Härtel

To overcome the shortcomings of diversity training programs, the purpose of this paper is to conceptualize an organizational diversity-learning framework, which features an…

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Abstract

Purpose

To overcome the shortcomings of diversity training programs, the purpose of this paper is to conceptualize an organizational diversity-learning framework, which features an organizational intervention for employees’ joint decision-making process with other employees from different statuses, functions, and identities. Borrowing key principles from the diversity learning (Rainey and Kolb, 1995); integration and learning perspective (Ely and Thomas, 2001; Thomas and Ely, 1996), and the key practices informed by deliberative democratic theories (Thompson, 2008), the authors develop a new organizational diversity learning framework for behavioral, attitudinal, and cognitive learning at workplaces. They conclude with directions for future research.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper first presents an overview of key shortcomings of diversity training programs in relation to their group composition, design, content and evaluation. Second, it borrows the key principles of diversity learning (Rainey and Kolb, 1995); integration and learning perspectives (Ely and Thomas, 2001; Thomas and Ely, 1996), and the key practices informed by deliberative democratic theories (Thompson, 2008) to delineate the organizational diversity learning framework. Third, it presents a table of the approach contrasted with the shortcomings of diversity training programs and discusses practical and theoretical contributions, along with directions for future research.

Findings

This paper conceptualizes an organizational diversity-learning framework, which features an organizational intervention for employees’ joint decision-making process with other employees from different statuses, functions, and identities.

Research limitations/implications

The organizational diversity learning framework developed in this paper provides an inclusive diversity learning paradigm in which diversity learning rests in the experience of the learner. As stated by experiential learning theory, this framework encourages workers to heuristically learn about diverse perspectives in a psychologically safe environment, to reflect on different perspectives, and to create a new awareness about learning from others. As the participants learn to apply new repertoires for interacting with others in their daily work interactions (e.g. listening to different perspectives shared by unfamiliar social group members), it proposes that their behaviors may create a ripple effect, changing other colleagues’ attitudes, behaviors, and thinking patterns on working with diverse coworkers.

Practical implications

This paper provides detailed instructions for practitioners to facilitate diversity learning. It highlights a few key practical implications. First, the framework provides a method of organization-wide diversity learning through intersecting networks within the workplace, which is designed to reduce the elitist organizational decision making that mainly occurs at the upper echelon. Second, unlike other stand-alone diversity initiatives, the framework is embedded in the organizational decision-making process, which makes employees’ learning applicable to core organizational activities, contributing to both employees’ diversity learning and organizational growth. Third, the framework provides a preliminary model for transferring employees’ diversity learning in daily work operations, nurturing their behavioral learning to interact with different social groups more frequently at work and inclusive of their colleagues’ perspectives, feelings, and attitudes.

Social implications

Workforces across nations are becoming increasingly diverse, and, simultaneously, the gap and tension between demographic representation in the upper and lower echelons is widening. By joining with other scholars who have advocated for the need to move beyond diversity training programs, the authors developed the organizational diversity learning framework for meaningful co-participation of employees with different statuses, functions, and identities. By inviting minority perspectives into the organizational decision-making process, top managers can explicitly send a message to minority groups that their perspectives matter and that their contributions are highly valued by the organization.

Originality/value

There has not been a conceptual paper that delineates the diversity inclusive decision-making process within a workplace. The authors established the organizational diversity learning framework based on the diversity learning, organizational diversity integration and learning perspectives, and deliberative democracy practices. The proposed framework guides organizations in structural interventions to educate employees on how to learn from multiple perspectives for better organizational decision making.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 46 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Yang Zhao, Yuka Fujimoto and Sanjaya Singh Gaur

The purpose of this paper is to identify key antecedents of work-family enrichment (WFE) for Chinese workers in China. The paper adopts the Chinese cultural perspectives (i.e…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify key antecedents of work-family enrichment (WFE) for Chinese workers in China. The paper adopts the Chinese cultural perspectives (i.e. philosophy of Confucian: Chinese family orientation and collectivism) as well as traditional Chinese philosophies of life as a whole.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper. Therefore, this section does not apply.

Findings

The key antecedents of Chinese WFE have been identified and presented in the conceptual framework. Testable propositions have also been developed and presented in this paper.

Practical implications

The conceptual framework showing the identified key antecedents of Chinese WFE highlights the necessity for the corporate leaders to rethink the ways to promote well-being and productivity of Chinese workforce in China. Meanwhile, managers should rethink about WFE among Chinese employees and regard employees as a whole person rather than just a worker with certain skills or abilities.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to propose the concept of life enrichment by examining the antecedents of WFE particularly from the Chinese philosophical and cultural perspective.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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