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Article
Publication date: 18 November 2013

Yuanhui Li

The papers in this issue make a significant original contribution which will result in the better understanding of Chinese corporate finance management challenges from…

235

Abstract

Purpose

The papers in this issue make a significant original contribution which will result in the better understanding of Chinese corporate finance management challenges from both theoretical and practical perspective. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The papers of this issue have a wide range of coverage related to corporate finance, such as CSR disclosure, organizational structure, earnings management, ownership structure, media impact, corporate accidents, and institution background. Those papers selected are all based on empirical researches with the original designs of their modeling, by the real and fundamental data from the latest Chinese market and enterprises.

Findings

The author believes that such in-depth analysis and discussion will enhance the understanding for both researches and practitioners on the behavior of managing corporate finance in China. Those findings will contribute to the establishment of Chinese management theories and to the building of a wide range of Chinese management practices.

Originality/value

Although the angle of each paper varies, they are all trying to have a deep analysis which may unveil the behavior of corporate finance decision. Some of such behaviors will be beneficial to the long-term sustainable growth of the company, while others, though, may have the negative impact on the corporate value creation.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 April 2016

Yuanhui Li, Ying Luo, Jiali Wang and Check-Teck Foo

This paper aims to investigate the economic consequence of the tax reductive strategy on stock price. The authors’ theory, empirically reinforced, suggests managerial tax…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the economic consequence of the tax reductive strategy on stock price. The authors’ theory, empirically reinforced, suggests managerial tax aggressiveness endangers the corporation through a heightened risk in stock price crashing. Information opacity worsens the situation by reinforcing the relationship. Policymakers should emphasize two aspects: market openness and tighter institutional monitoring. The evidence shown in this paper demonstrates that these two weaken the tax aggressiveness impact on risk of a crashing stock price.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample in this paper consists of 9,702 observations from listed firms from 2008 to 2013 in China. The tax rate is manually collected and all the other original data used in this study are sourced from Wind and China Capital Market and Accounting Research databases. Both logistic regression and ordinary least squares regression methods are used to test the hypothesis in this paper.

Findings

One key insight is in tax aggressiveness to be strongly correlated with a greater risk of future stock price crashing. The authors also found information opacity to exert a positive moderating effect. That is, the higher the information opacity, the stronger and more positive the correlation between tax aggression and stock price crash risk. However, the market process and an institutional investor have opposite, negative impacts. An open market environment reduces their correlativeness. Similarly, stronger institutional vigilance leads to an attenuation of such a co-relationship.

Practical implications

The findings of this paper have wide policy implications for management and control by authorities of listed corporations. Aggressiveness in management of corporate taxes accentuates the risks borne by stockholders. If so, internally within the corporation, such aggression shown by management, if not proscribed, could be subject to scrutiny, possibly by an independent committee. Externally, this may be countered by the authority in emphasizing three key factors: openness in information sharing, the market environment and tighter institutional monitoring.

Originality/value

This study provides a consequential theory of aggressive management of tax, rigorously analyzed and strongly, empirically supported. Overall, aggressiveness in tax management is related with assumption of higher risks in the crashing of stock price. The relationship is enhanced through information opacity, but reduced via market environment and institutional monitoring.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 29 March 2022

Yuanhui Li, Yezen Kannan, Stephen Rau and Shuning Yang

The aim of this paper is to provide additional insights on the association between real earnings management (REM) and crash risk, particularly from the perspective of an…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to provide additional insights on the association between real earnings management (REM) and crash risk, particularly from the perspective of an emerging market economy. It also examines the moderation role that internal and external corporate governance may play in this area.

Design/methodology/approach

Relying on archival data from the RESSET and CSMAR databases over a timeframe from 2010 to 2018 of China listed company, the authors test the hypotheses by regressing common measures of crash risk on the treatment variable (REM) and crash risk control variables identified in the prior crash risk literature. The authors also introduce monitoring proxies (internal controls as an internal governance and institutional ownership as an external governance) and assess how effective internal and external governance moderate the relation between REM and stock price crash risk.

Findings

The results suggest firms with higher REM have a significantly greater stock price crash risk, and that this association is mitigated by external monitoring. That is, greater institutional ownership, particularly pressure insensitive owners, mitigates the impact of REM on stock price crash risk. However, internal control does not mitigate the association between REM and stock price crash risk.

Originality/value

Following the passage of the Sarbanes–Oxley (SOX) Act, prior research has documented an increase in the use of REM and a positive association between REM and cash risk. The authors demonstrate that they persist in one of the largest emerging markets where institutional regulations, market conditions and corporate behaviors are different from those in developed markets. Also, the assessment of the moderation effect of internal and external governance mechanisms could have meaningful implications for investors and regulators in Chinese and other emerging markets.

Details

China Accounting and Finance Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1029-807X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 November 2013

Yuanhui Li, Jie Zhang and Check-Teck Foo

Here, the paper aims to model major corporate characteristics associated with corporate social responsibility (CSR) reporting (in particular, its quality). Corporations in…

2093

Abstract

Purpose

Here, the paper aims to model major corporate characteristics associated with corporate social responsibility (CSR) reporting (in particular, its quality). Corporations in China are increasingly expected by the public and government to be more socially responsible. As such, it will be intriguing to ask, what are the characteristics associated with higher quality CSR reporting?

Design/methodology/approach

CSR report quality scores are hand-gathered from HEXUN (web site) whilst financial and stock market information from the China Stock Market and Accounting Research (CSMAR) database. A total of 613 CSR reports' quality scores were utilized (Rankins CSR ratings) in the process of developing the model. Reports are hand-gathered from corporations listed on both the Shenzhen and Shanghai stock exchanges (SSE).

Findings

The results suggest most interestingly, the quality of CSR report (mandatory) to be strongly, positively related with corporate financial characteristics: market capitalization (corporate size), shareholders' concentration of powers, corporate financial leverage (implying bondholders/debtors' influence). Surprisingly, CSR reporting is associated neither with corporate profitability nor by state-ownership. The presence of independent directors (at least in China) seems to have negative influences.

Practical implications

CSR reporting may easily be mandated by government through a regulatory process. However, this does not necessarily lead to reports of a high quality. Instead, orientation towards higher visibility in social responsibility for listed corporations is better explained by financial characteristics: market valuation, ownership and leverage.

Originality/value

This paper utilizes for the first time, in-depth and multi-faceted quality CSR scores (overall, segregated into macro-social, content and technology) for investigating CSR behavior of listed corporations in China. The findings suggest financial characteristics size (market valuation), ownership (shareholders' concentration of powers) and corporate leverage are better predictors of CSR behavior among listed corporations.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Yuanhui Li and John Ferguson

The purpose of the papers included in this issue is to cover a broad range of contemporary issues in Chinese corporate financial management and therefore provide the…

251

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the papers included in this issue is to cover a broad range of contemporary issues in Chinese corporate financial management and therefore provide the readers with important insights into Chinese financial markets as well as the social and economic consequences of firm behavior in the Chinese context.

Design/methodology/approach

The first part of this issue is a special section on “Corporate Finance and Corporate Social Responsibility”, which includes three papers that explore various aspects of corporate social responsibility (CSR) from a finance perspective – including the relationship between CSR and the cost of equity, the “insurance-like effect” of CSR and competition in corporate philanthropy. The remainder of the issue includes seven further papers that cover a wide range of finance-related topics, including currency and equity, monetary policy, cross-border mergers and acquisitions, earnings management, overseas investment, information disclosure, social capital and cosmopolitanism. All of the papers included in this issue are based on empirical research that draws on primary and secondary data from Chinese financial markets and from the information disclosures of Chinese enterprises.

Findings

The authors are confident that such in-depth discussions and analysis will help researchers and practitioners to develop a better understanding of the issues faced by Chinese managers in the context of China’s economic transformation. The findings reported in this issue will help inform and develop Chinese management theories based on a wide range of Chinese management practices.

Originality/value

Each paper in this issue reports on different aspects of finance, reporting and management in the Chinese context, discussing findings that have both relevance and significance beyond China.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Yuanhui Li and Check Teck Foo

The paper aims to investigate the relationship between social responsibility and equity in China. In the process, the authors utilize data on corporate social…

2959

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to investigate the relationship between social responsibility and equity in China. In the process, the authors utilize data on corporate social responsibility (CSR) reports (in particular, information disclosure) and equity capital (focusing on cost). The overarching hypothesis may be phrased simply as: is CSR reporting rewarded by the capital market in China?

Design/methodology/approach

The data of 3,012 list corporations in China securities are used and 1,015 CSR report quality scores (Rankins CSR Ratings) are hand-gathered from HEXUN (Web site) and utilized in the process of developing the model; financial and stock market information is obtained from the Wind database and the China Stock Market and Accounting Research database.

Findings

The authors’ results suggest that overall the quality of CSR report is strongly, negatively related with the cost of capital: the higher the quality of social responsibility information disclosure, the lower the cost of equity capital. Most intriguingly, the authors find a sharp contrast between the government-owned corporations (state-owned enterprises) and privately owned, listed corporations. The quality of CSR reporting has a much higher impact in lowering the cost of equity capital for privately owned corporations. In contrasting the results for mandatory versus voluntary CSR disclosure, the quality of CSR reporting for the latter does not have any higher impact in lowering the cost of equity.

Practical implications

Good social responsibility behavior by corporations and their subsequent information disclosure has beneficial financial impacts. In the authors’ research, the authors showed its immediate impact to be in the lowering of the overall corporate cost of equity. In this regard, the authors would recommend that chief executive officers pay more attention to CSR practice and its disclosure. Private firms issuing CSR reports will benefit from much lower financing costs through the capital market.

Originality/value

Due to the structure of capital markets in China, the authors are able to show that CSR reporting of privately owned, listed corporations have much more effective signaling power. On the basis of the authors’ empirical findings in relation to the quality of CSR reporting and its impact on cost of capital, the authors suggest there is greater scope for research which takes a “finance and society” perspective. Based on more extensive research, such a perspective may enable scholars to orientate finance and finance research toward a model of “socio-capitalism”.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Check Teck Foo

416

Abstract

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Article
Publication date: 18 November 2013

Kun Su, Rui Wan and Bin Li

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate and examine the effects of ultimate ownership, institutionality and their interactions on capital structure in a unified…

878

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate and examine the effects of ultimate ownership, institutionality and their interactions on capital structure in a unified framework, based on evidence from China.

Design/methodology/approach

Using six years of panel data of Chinese non-financial listed firms between 2004 and 2009, this paper estimates with correlation analysis and multiple regression analysis.

Findings

This paper finds that debt financing facilitates the ultimate owner's expropriation behavior. The separation of control rights and cash flow rights is positively related to capital structure, while cash flow rights negatively affect it. Compared with private ultimate owners, state ultimate owners have less incentive to reap the benefits of expropriation, implying that the separation of control rights and cash flow rights has a smaller effect on the capital structure of state-owned firms. The improvement of institutionality can restrain ultimate owners' expropriation behavior, and regional institutional development is negatively related to capital structure. The separation of control rights and cash flow rights has a smaller positive effect on capital structure in regions with better-developed institutionality.

Originality/value

This paper incorporates ultimate ownership and institutionality into a unified analytical framework of capital structure. It not only enriches related studies on capital structure, but also helps us understand the institutional roots of irrational capital structure behaviors in China. This paper also provides further evidence on ultimate owners' expropriation of minority shareholders through debt financing.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 November 2013

Kunyuan Qiao

The paper aims to identify the relationship between institutional logics and corporate finance in the context of China. It models the institutional logics and outlines why…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to identify the relationship between institutional logics and corporate finance in the context of China. It models the institutional logics and outlines why and how they impact the capital structure. The study aims to expand the domain of corporate finance by introducing the institutional effects.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employs the ownership and region to proxy institutional logics, and a time dummy for their evolution and tests how they shape firms' capital structure through panel data regression.

Findings

The paper finds that capital structures in firms dominated by state logic are less heterogeneous but the heterogeneities of all firms' increase over time and the capital structures in firms dominated by state logic deviate more from the optimality but those of all firms approach the optimality as time goes by. I also document that the institutional logics affect the corporate financing decisions through the selection of chief executive officers (CEOs).

Research limitations/implications

The paper demonstrates how state and market institutions are embodied in firms and how their evolution requires firms to adapt, and it proposes a brand-new insight into the marketization process of China.

Practical implications

The paper finds that the firms are unable to acquire optimal capital structure because of the institutional pressure and derive some implications on managerial practice of Chinese firms.

Originality/value

The paper analyses and examines the impacts of the institutional logics on corporate financing decisions as well as the potential channel, enhancing the understanding of the institutions and firms' responses.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 November 2013

Jiuchang Wei, Han Wang, Jin Fan and Yujuan Zhang

– This study aims to explore the mutual relation of corporate accidents, stock market responses, and media coverage.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the mutual relation of corporate accidents, stock market responses, and media coverage.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper empirically investigated 119 listed firms' accidents during the 2005-2012 period using the methods of event study, correlation analysis, and multiple regressions.

Findings

The stock market response and media response are independent with each other in the following 30 days after accidents. Corporate accidents have significant negative effects on the stock market responses. As time goes by, the market reaction tapers off. In a mediate term period, accident onset has significantly positive effect and firm's ownership has weakly positive effect in addition to factors of asset and number of shareholders.

Originality/value

This paper first examines the interrelationships among accidents, media coverage, and stock market responses. It is part of the corporate social responsibility to avoid or reduce the stakeholders' nervous behaviors in times of accident. Hence, accident-stricken firms should release sufficient and transparent information to shareholders so that they can trade the share more rationally.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

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