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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Ke Zhang, Qiupin Zhong and Yuan Zuo

The purpose of this paper is to overcome the shortcomings of existing multivariate grey incidence models that cannot analyze the similarity of behavior matrixes.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to overcome the shortcomings of existing multivariate grey incidence models that cannot analyze the similarity of behavior matrixes.

Design/methodology/approach

First, the feasibility of using gradient to measure the similarity of continuous functions is analyzed theoretically and intuitively. Then, a grey incidence degree is constructed for multivariable continuous functions. The model employs the gradient to measure the local similarity, as incidence coefficient function, of two functions, and combines local similarity into global similarity, as grey incidence degree by double integral. Third, the gradient incidence degree model for behavior matrix is proposed by discretizing the continuous models. Furthermore, the properties and satisfaction of grey incidence atom of the proposed model are research, respectively. Finally, a financial case is studied to examine the validity of the model.

Findings

The proposed model satisfies properties of invariance under mean value transformation, multiple transformation and linear transformation, which proves it is a model constructed from similarity perspective. Meanwhile, the case study shows that proposed model performs effectively.

Practical implications

The method proposed in the paper could be used in financial multivariable time series clustering, personalized recommendation in e-commerce, etc., when the behavior matrixes need to be analyzed from trend similarity perspective.

Originality/value

It will promote the accuracy of multivariate grey incidence model.

Details

Grey Systems: Theory and Application, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-9377

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Book part
Publication date: 1 March 2021

Sylvia Veronica Siregar and Bayu Tenoyo

The aim of this study is to examine the determinants of students’ perceptions of the Green University. The authors also examine whether students’ perceptions of the Green…

Abstract

The aim of this study is to examine the determinants of students’ perceptions of the Green University. The authors also examine whether students’ perceptions of the Green University are determined by the type of sustainability-related subjects that they have been taken to date. The authors divided sustainability-related subjects into those related to economics, social, and environment. The authors also compare students’ perceptions by different university types (public vs. private) as well as students from different majors (economics and business vs. engineering). The authors use questionnaires for data collection where respondents are undergraduate students in Jakarta, Indonesia. The result shows that on average our respondents have positive perceptions about Green University practices. However, the authors also find that students’ perceptions variate across university types. The authors also find that students’ perceptions about the importance of Green University are not positively affected by sustainability-related subjects. The authors find that public university students have higher and significant perceptions about the Green University, whereas students’ majors have no significant effects.

Details

Recent Developments in Asian Economics International Symposia in Economic Theory and Econometrics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-359-8

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Book part
Publication date: 27 May 2020

Karin Edvardsson Björnberg, Inga-Britt Skogh and Lena Gumaelius

In this study, we critically examine how students enrolled in a combined engineering and teacher education program given at the KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden…

Abstract

In this study, we critically examine how students enrolled in a combined engineering and teacher education program given at the KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden, understand the concept of sustainable development (SD) and the professional responsibilities of engineers versus teachers in contributing to this goal. A questionnaire was used to collect and analyze data based on five research questions: (1) How do students conceptualize the notion of SD? (2) What aspects of SD are students interested in? (3) Are there any gender differences in what aspects of SD students are interested in? (4) How do students perceive the roles and responsibilities of engineers versus teachers in contributing to SD? and (5) How confident are students in their abilities to address SD issues vocationally? The data indicated a conventional view of SD among the students; a clear interest in sustainability issues, especially for ecologically linked questions; a tendency to ascribe significant but differentiated responsibilities to engineers/teachers; and a low degree of confidence in their own ability to adequately address SD issues vocationally. The data also indicated differences between male and female students when looking at interest in different aspects of SD. Overall, female students were found to be slightly more interested in SD than the male students. This gender difference is larger in relation to social aspects than ecological or economic aspects. It is suggested that future sustainable development education needs a shift of focus from what separates female and male students to what unites them. The observed “confidence gap” that exists between stated degree of interest in, and perceived importance of, sustainability issues, suggests the potential for significant improvement of the design of the Master of Science in Engineering and in Education program (CL-program).

Details

Teaching and Learning Strategies for Sustainable Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-639-7

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Book part
Publication date: 13 September 2018

Rita Yi Man Li, Li Meng, Tat Ho Leung, Jian Zuo, Beiqi Tang and Yuan Wang

The circular economy (CE) proposes that all materials flow in a close-looped system. Waste generated by one production stage may be useful in another. Thus, the idea of a…

Abstract

The circular economy (CE) proposes that all materials flow in a close-looped system. Waste generated by one production stage may be useful in another. Thus, the idea of a CE is linked to the goal of zero waste (ZW) and promotes a range of sustainable economic, social and environmental benefits in each sector. When we apply this to construction waste management, waste can be managed through reducing, recycling, upcycling and reusing. However, there is an inevitable cost implication associated with this process due to the additional requirement of inventory and waste processing, and this becomes a disincentive to implementing the CE. Formal institutions, referring here to legal rules and regulations, play a critical role in motivating firms and individuals towards a CE. As different countries have different government rules and regulations, and there is limited research on their differences, we review Asia’s and Europe’s legal rules and regulations relevant to the goal of ZW and CE in the construction sector.

Details

Unmaking Waste in Production and Consumption: Towards the Circular Economy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-620-4

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Article
Publication date: 24 April 2020

Elisabete Correia, Fátima Conde, Rosa Nunes and Clara Viseu

This paper aims to compare the environmental sustainability practices at the campus operations between two Portuguese higher education institutions (HEIs) at different…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to compare the environmental sustainability practices at the campus operations between two Portuguese higher education institutions (HEIs) at different stages of the implementation of an Eco-School Programme. It also seeks to analyse the involvement of the students in the process of implementing these practices in their institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was carried out in two HEIs (a green and a non-green institution). Data were collected from a total of 832 students. Techniques of descriptive statistics and inferential statistical techniques such as the Mann-Whitney test, χ2 and Spearman correlation test, were applied.

Findings

The results obtained show that, from the students’ perspective, and in both institutions, there is still much to be done on the path towards sustainability, particularly in transport and landscaping. Significant differences were found only between some environmental sustainability practices at the campus level. However, students from the green institution are more participative in sustainability activities.

Practical implications

This study provides a picture of two HEIs’ sustainability behaviour from the students’ standpoint, which can be important for decision-makers in HEIs, in as much that students are one of the HEIs’ major stakeholder groups; furthermore, it enables them to better guide their efforts towards sustainability.

Originality/value

This paper focusses on the students’ perspective and their role in the sustainability initiatives undertaken by HEIs. It can be useful for future research that attempts to analyse the importance of HEIs’ stakeholder participation in sustainability.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Bo Xia, Tian Wu, Martin Skitmore, Qing Chen, Mei Li and Jian Zuo

China’s accelerated urbanisation leads directly to pressure on the urban environment. The purpose of this paper is to identify best practices involved in a real…

Abstract

Purpose

China’s accelerated urbanisation leads directly to pressure on the urban environment. The purpose of this paper is to identify best practices involved in a real sustainable community projects for the experience to be replicated in future.

Design/methodology/approach

To explore the practical development experiences and technological applications, a case study was conducted, involving both document analysis and semi-structured interviews.

Findings

The findings identify the green technologies and strategies used in the project planning and design process. The social considerations of the project development are also recognised in providing comfort, convenience and safety for their residents. Furthermore, the research highlights the fact that sustainable communities can incur less operational costs compared with traditional ones and therefore provide a feasible option for clients with a greater capability for upfront investment.

Originality/value

The results of the research provide valuable references for developers in the development of sustainable communities in both China and other countries.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2020

Soo Yong Kim, Minh V. Nguyen and Van Truong Luu

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to develop a performance evaluation framework for construction and demolition waste management (CDWM); second, to investigate…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to develop a performance evaluation framework for construction and demolition waste management (CDWM); second, to investigate feasible and effective strategies to improve the CDWM performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the literature highlighted a lack of comprehensive research to evaluate CDWM performance of key project stakeholders, like owners, contractors and consultants. After the identification of 22 performance variables through a pilot study, a first questionnaire survey was conducted to investigate the views of respondents toward CDWM performance. The 132 responses were analyzed using factor analysis to determine specific CDWM performance factors, which formed a conceptual performance evaluation framework of CDWM. Furthermore, a practical index (PI) was proposed to integrate the feasibility and effectiveness of CDWM strategies. The values of PI were employed to prioritize CDWM strategies from data collected in a second questionnaire survey.

Findings

The validated results from factor analysis revealed that the conceptual performance evaluation framework of CDWM consists of six factors; and the attitude toward CDWM emerged as the foremost critical factor. The prioritization of PI values indicated that raising CDWM awareness among construction stakeholders was the most feasible and effective strategy for CDWM.

Originality/value

This CDWM performance evaluation framework is one of the first to holistically evaluate CDWM from key stakeholder perspectives. In addition, the PI firstly enables quantitative integration of the feasibility and effectiveness of CDWM strategies.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 27 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Suraya Hamid, Mohamad Taha Ijab, Hidayah Sulaiman, Rina Md. Anwar and Azah Anir Norman

The explosion of social media use such as Facebook among higher education students is deemed to have great potential in widely disseminating environmental sustainability…

Abstract

Purpose

The explosion of social media use such as Facebook among higher education students is deemed to have great potential in widely disseminating environmental sustainability awareness. The paper aims to capture, summarise, synthesise and comment on the role of social media to garner interest of students and staff on environmental sustainability issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Systematic literature review technique is adopted, and three selected online databases were searched for relevant papers for review. Specific data were extracted from each paper, and the discussion section was based on the developed research questions.

Findings

Higher education needs to fully leverage the ubiquity of social media to extend how environmental sustainability is viewed by the students and staff. Sustainability practices conducted at the university level such as recycling, reduction of electricity and water consumptions and paper reduction in classroom and used to engage students on environmental matters. For staff, social media can be leveraged as to convey the university policy and assist in their quest to become full-fledged green universities.

Research limitations/implications

Some of the limitations of this research include the lack of keyword search using synonyms or related terms equivalent to the term “awareness”, lack of forward and backward searches, and the papers were searched until end of 2013 only. Future research needs to take advantage of the current limitations to investigate this topic and be empirically supported by theories using quantitative, qualitative or mixed-method-based research. Future studies could also develop relevant frameworks to propose an effective use of social media for creating environmental sustainability awareness in higher education.

Practical implications

Propagations of environmental sustainability awareness in higher education would be more effective with the use of social media.

Social implications

In principle, the increase of environmental awareness level would increase the students’ good behavioural conduct on environmental sustainability.

Originality/value

While the broad topic of environmental sustainability in higher education is widely discussed, the role of social media in shaping environmental sustainability awareness is still under researched. This situation provides a significant potential for exploration by sustainability researchers to craft their investigation on the effective role of social media in creating environmental awareness in higher education.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2020

Eugénia de Matos Pedro, João Leitão and Helena Alves

This study aims to identify stakeholders’ perceptions of the effects associated with different components of intellectual capital (IC) on the sustainable development (SD…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify stakeholders’ perceptions of the effects associated with different components of intellectual capital (IC) on the sustainable development (SD) practices of higher education institutions (HEIs).

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical approach uses a structural equation model to provide new empirical findings in relation to 738 students and 587 lecturers/researchers at seven Portuguese state HEIs through quantitative research.

Findings

The results obtained are, firstly, important contributions to the literature on the IC and SD practices of HEIs, as a relationship between these two constructs is confirmed, especially through relational capital (RC) and structural capital (SC). Secondly, the stakeholders considered show different perceptions of the influence of the components of HEIs’ IC on these institutions’ SD practices, and thirdly, perception of the economic dimension is most influenced.

Practical implications

The empirical findings indicate the need to provide better information about HEIs’ policies and practices of SD and how the latter contribute to the SD of the institution and its region of influence.

Originality/value

No previous studies investigate students and teachers/researchers’ perceptions of the social, environmental, economic and organizational dimensions of SD in HEIs and at the same time how those perceptions can be influenced by the components of IC (e.g. human capital, SC, RC) in that institution.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Şiir Kılkış

Despite an emerging trend in the higher education sector toward sustainable campuses, comparative analyses that span multiple themes across multiple campuses are still…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite an emerging trend in the higher education sector toward sustainable campuses, comparative analyses that span multiple themes across multiple campuses are still limited. The purpose of this paper is to reduce such a gap by comparing universities that are members of the International Sustainable Campus Network across themes that are related to environmental quality.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 34 universities are included in the sample. Indicators are systematically reviewed and clustered into ten themes. Common indicators (CIs) are identified in seven themes for at least seven and at most 20 campuses. At the absence of CIs, the given theme is assessed based on the measures applied. The results indicate the average levels of performance in the sample and/or the scope of the measures that are undertaken.

Findings

According to related values, an average campus spent 233,402 MWh of energy in buildings, 838,317 m3 of water on campus, generated 4,442 tonnes of waste, and emitted 75,354 tonnes of CO2 emissions. The average recycling rate was 50 percent, the average single occupancy vehicle rate in campus commuting was 34 percent, and on average, there were 152 sustainability-oriented courses. Best practices from the measures included energy audits for data centers, retrofit of water intense laboratories, and on-site renewable energy projects.

Originality/value

In addition, a unified monitoring framework is proposed to improve subsequent comparative analyses of campuses. Universities must focus on the use of the campus as a living laboratory to guide society toward a more sustainable future.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

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