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Article
Publication date: 7 December 2023

Xin Zhao, Na Fu and Yseult Freeney

The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of the (in)congruence between team leader self-evaluation and follower evaluation about the leader's transformation leadership…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of the (in)congruence between team leader self-evaluation and follower evaluation about the leader's transformation leadership (TL) on team performance, as well as the conditions under which the impact can be strengthened or weakened.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts a survey method to collect data from matched sales team leaders and sales team members in 81 teams. A multi-level polynomial regression analysis was conducted.

Findings

Team performance was higher in teams with balanced or high TL than with balanced or low TL. Among the teams with incongruence, no difference was found between leader underestimation and leader overestimation. TL congruence plays a moderating role in the relationship between team follower evaluation of TL and team performance, such that the relationship is stronger when team leader self-evaluation and follower evaluation are congruent than incongruent.

Originality/value

This study extends the authors' current understanding of TL literature by combining and contrasting the different perceptions of TL from both the leaders themselves and the followers towards leaders. The findings highlight the importance of congruence versus incongruence rather than just the high or low levels of follower TL evaluation. It provides a more complete understanding of the TL and team performance relationship than the traditional view that promotes a linear relationship between TL and performance.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 45 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 7 February 2024

Maha Alsuwailem and Yseult Freeney

This study examines the role of Saudi women’s work motivational drivers on work–home conflict (WHC) and work–home enrichment (WHE). It considers the moderating role of…

401

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the role of Saudi women’s work motivational drivers on work–home conflict (WHC) and work–home enrichment (WHE). It considers the moderating role of psychological detachment from work during the evening between one workday and the next and how it impacts on the mediating role of WHC and WHE on work performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on self-determination theory and enrichment and depletion perspectives on the work–home interface, the study employs a quantitative lagged study over a period of three consecutive working days, with data collected from 358 Saudi women working in academia.

Findings

Moderated mediation structural equation modelling (MMSEM) analysis reveals that intrinsic motivation is significantly, positively related to WHE and home–work enrichment (HWE), whereas extrinsic motivation is only significantly and positively related to home–work conflict (HWC). Results show that detaching from work weakens the positive association between intrinsic motivation and HWE. In line with predictions, WHE is significantly, positively related to citizenship behaviour towards both individuals and organizations, whilst HWE is significantly related to citizenship behaviour towards individuals only. HWC is only significantly related to citizenship behaviour towards the organisation.

Social implications

The research highlights the enriching experiences for Saudi women, who have the opportunity to pursue a career and highlight benefits of their ongoing empowerment.

Originality/value

This research brings a unique motivational perspective to work–life research and addresses a shortcoming of work–life research in considering an understudied culturally distinct population. It emphasises on the enriching experiences of Saudi women who have the opportunity to pursue a career, highlighting the benefits of their ongoing empowerment.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 June 2013

Yseult Freeney and Martin R. Fellenz

Against a backdrop of increased work intensification within maternity hospitals, the purpose of this paper is to examine the role of work engagement in the quality of care…

2002

Abstract

Purpose

Against a backdrop of increased work intensification within maternity hospitals, the purpose of this paper is to examine the role of work engagement in the quality of care delivered to patients and in general health of the midwives delivering care, as reported by midwives and nurses.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative questionnaires consisting of standardised measures were distributed to midwives in two large maternity hospitals. These questionnaires assessed levels of work engagement, supervisor and colleague support, general health and quality of care.

Findings

Structural equation modelling analysis revealed a best‐fit model that demonstrated work engagement to be a significant partial mediator between organisational and supervisor support and quality of care, and as a significant predictor of self‐reported general health. Together, supervisor support, social support and organisational resources, mediated by work engagement, explained 38 per cent of the variance in quality of care at the unit level and 23 per cent of variance in general health among midwives (χ2(67)=113; p<0.01, CFI=0.961, RMSEA=0.06).

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited in that it uses self‐report measures of quality of care and lacks objective indicators of patient outcomes. The cross‐sectional design also does not allow for causal inferences to be drawn from the data.

Practical implications

This study provides evidence for the links between individual levels of work engagement and both health and self‐reports of unit level quality of care. The results support the importance of health services organisations and managers deploying organisational resources to foster employee work engagement. The results also highlight the significant role of the immediate nurse manager and suggest training and development for such roles is a valuable investment.

Originality/value

These results are the first to link work engagement and performance in health care contexts and point to the value of work engagement for both unit performance and for individual employee well‐being in health organisations.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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