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Article
Publication date: 25 December 2020

Gerrit van Dalfsen, Jo Van Hoecke, Hans Westerbeek and Veerle De Bosscher

The purpose of this paper is to investigate coaches' views on developing leadership and shared leadership capacity in particular in competitive youth football.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate coaches' views on developing leadership and shared leadership capacity in particular in competitive youth football.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative examination focusses on the leadership philosophy of ten male coaches at the sub-elite competitive level in youth football in The Netherlands and applies the theory of shared leadership to examine coaches' views on developing leadership capacity.

Findings

Only few coaches have a clear philosophy on the development of leadership in general and/or shared leadership in particular. Most coaches do not have a distinct view on how to involve players in the team processes. Shared leadership development in youth teams occurs occasionally but can be implemented more intentionally.

Research limitations/implications

Although this study lacks generalizability, coaches' views are required in understanding how shared leadership is to be developed in youth sport.

Practical implications

For implementing shared leadership in football purposefully, a clear view on the development of youth is required, whereas coaches need to be taught, how to involve the individual players in team processes such as decision-making. In addition, leadership development in sport may have the potential of transfer of skills to other domains.

Social implications

Learning shared leadership at a young age by athletes can have a positive influence on relationships in teams on micro-level and might have an impact on meso-level within a football club because of its social constructionist approach.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to apply shared leadership at the micro-level of competitive youth football making use of football coaches' view.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Miznah Omair Alomair

The purpose of this paper is to review current literature on peace leadership and youth leadership. It aims to shed a light on the extent to which peace leadership can…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review current literature on peace leadership and youth leadership. It aims to shed a light on the extent to which peace leadership can afford youth leaders and youth peace activists to engage in peace processes and peacebuilding initiatives. By understanding how notions of peace leadership are realized in youth leadership practices, the paper hopes to contribute to the ongoing dialogue on advancing the practice of peace leadership for present and future young leaders.

Design/methodology/approach

The literature review explored peace leadership from the approaches of peacebuilding processes, nonviolence, and an integral perspective; expanded the current understanding of youth leadership by presenting the theoretical foundations and the role of youth in leadership that align with an advanced view of youth leadership; and described the intersection of peace leadership and youth leadership by identifying how youth leadership is related to peace leadership within three overarching contexts: political systems, schools, and communities.

Findings

The literature review highlights the reciprocity between peace leadership and youth leadership. It identifies nonviolence, communication, dialogue, conflict resolution, mediation, building social capital, and relationship building as practices in which youth leaders engage in to promote peaceful and sustainable change in varying contexts.

Originality/value

This review of the literature presents the need for further research on the intersection of peace leadership with youth leadership to help advance both areas within the field of leadership studies and understand how peace leadership for youth informs leadership theory and practice across contexts and areas of discipline.

Details

International Journal of Public Leadership, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4929

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Nurul Afiqah Nor Amin, Chin Han Wuen and Amiruddin Ismail

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the styles that are desirable in a leader in the perspective of youth in Asia, particularly Brunei Darussalam and South Korea…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the styles that are desirable in a leader in the perspective of youth in Asia, particularly Brunei Darussalam and South Korea. Thus, by investigating it using the Path Goal Theory as its approach, this study provides leaders with the desirable leadership style to motivate and influence the youth.

Design/methodology/approach

The research used a quantitative method with a proportionate stratified sampling method using the criteria of age of youth defined by UNESCO. The data then collected using a face-to-face method of a questionnaire from February 2016 till June 2016.

Findings

The evidence depicts that Bruneian youth prefers directive leadership while South Korean youth prefers supportive leadership. This finding is based on the selected styles that are desirable by the youth and their choice is also influenced by culture. This may imply that culture has a large impact which can determine the leadership styles best suited to the environment.

Research limitations/implications

Since the research has limited sample sizes and geographical location, this can lead to future research by considering more regions of different continents to determine whether different leadership preference still persists. This study can also be used as a basis to consider other factors in investigating leadership preference in Asian countries.

Originality/value

This paper identifies and encourages the need to study leadership style that is desirable among youth.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 36 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Manuel J. De Vera, Jose Enrique R. Corpus and Donn David P. Ramos

The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences gained by participants of youth leadership development (YLD) programs that introduce multi-stakeholder processes as…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences gained by participants of youth leadership development (YLD) programs that introduce multi-stakeholder processes as part of its training within the last five years. Moreover, the study delves into how participants are able to apply leadership and multi-stakeholder processes in their everyday lives and in their communities.

Design/methodology/approach

A perception survey of 41 respondents was conducted to examine leadership concepts identified and youth leadership practices in different social reform contexts.

Findings

Diverse challenges in terms of multi-stakeholder mobilization were evident in youth leaders’ engagement in communities. In spite of this, the YLD programs’ emphasis on multi-stakeholder process is very much embedded in the current youth leaders’ practice.

Research limitations/implications

The study contributes to the conduct of YLD programs, as well as on stakeholder engagement. Moreover, it contributes to advancing public leadership theory and practice by demonstrating how it extends to youth leadership experiences.

Practical implications

Multiple dimensions of YLD, especially in the realm of multi-stakeholder engagement, are discussed that may contribute to YLD programs.

Originality/value

To the best of knowledge, the authors provide the first study that investigates the contribution of the Bridging Leadership Framework that utilizes a multi-stakeholder approach in a YLD program using empirical data.

Details

International Journal of Public Leadership, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4929

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2018

Marsha de Vries and Ronald Wolbink

Since January 2015, the Dutch youth care system has been under construction. Its focus has shifted from the problematic to the normal development of children. Emphasis on…

Abstract

Purpose

Since January 2015, the Dutch youth care system has been under construction. Its focus has shifted from the problematic to the normal development of children. Emphasis on the capacities of both youths and parents, on customized care and on better cooperation between professionals should decrease the use of specialized services. This reconstruction of the youth care system not only appeals to the competencies and skills of professionals, but also requires innovations in terms of leadership. The purpose of this paper is to describe the struggle managers face when working to transform the youth care system, and to provide some suggestions for how managers can be supported.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on the results of two empirical, qualitative studies that were recently conducted by the Research Institute Youth, which is part of the Health Care and Social Work Research Centre of Windesheim University of Applied Sciences in Zwolle, the Netherlands. Over the course of a preliminary study, executive managers of five youth care organizations were interviewed on the ongoing transformations of their organizations and the changing roles and needs of managers within these transformations. Subsequently, 13 middle- and first-line managers of 3 youth care organizations were interviewed about their experiences and the ways in which they have handled the new roles they have taken on in transforming their organizations.

Findings

The management of youth care organizations is responsible for facilitating professionals in taking on and shaping their new roles, thus affecting not only the structure but also the culture and practices of youth care organizations and of management itself. This research shows that managers are struggling with these changes in their own ways. While youth care managers are struggling with their new roles and responsibilities, the intended transformation of the youth care system lags behind. Appropriate support of managers is essential, but is currently lacking. This paper provides some suggestions for how managers can be supported.

Originality/value

This paper identifies and explains the challenges that top-, middle- and lower-level managers face in current transformation processes in social service organizations, and provides some suggestions for how managers can be supported in these processes.

Details

International Journal of Public Leadership, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4929

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2013

Nathan Eva and Sen Sendjaya

In light of the research‐practice gap in youth leadership development, the purpose of this paper is to examine the effectiveness of youth leadership development in…

Abstract

Purpose

In light of the research‐practice gap in youth leadership development, the purpose of this paper is to examine the effectiveness of youth leadership development in Australia, on the basis of a multidimensional and holistic framework of servant leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, three separate studies were conducted to achieve the above purpose, namely 33 interviews with student leaders; ten interviews with secondary college teachers and principals, as well as youth leadership facilitators; and 97 survey responses from recent secondary college graduates.

Findings

There exists a significant gap between the perceptions of the students and those of the teachers/facilitators on what is being taught and what is required in youth leadership development programs. The study reveals that students have little exposure to ethics training throughout their leadership programs. The application of a holistic framework of servant leadership in youth leadership development programme is recommended and discussed.

Originality/value

A framework in which to develop holistic leadership concepts, characteristics and competencies within students was developed from the findings. This framework can be used as the basis for teaching and developing young leaders in particular, as well as in more general leadership programs.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 55 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2010

Jeffery D. Houghton and Trudy C. DiLiello

This paper sets out to develop and test a hypothesized model of the role of adult leadership development and youth leadership development as possible moderators of the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to develop and test a hypothesized model of the role of adult leadership development and youth leadership development as possible moderators of the relationships between creative self‐efficacy, perceived support for creativity, and individual creativity.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs the multi‐group nested goodness‐of‐fit strategy in LISREL 8.53 to test the interaction effects of two qualitative moderator variables.

Findings

Results suggest that adult leadership development may moderate the relationship between perceived organizational support for creativity and individual creativity, while youth leadership development may moderate the relationship between creative self‐efficacy and individual creativity.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include concerns regarding generalizability, possible social desirability and response set biases, self‐report data, and causality. The primary implication is that leadership development, targeted at adults as well as children, may represent one important key for unlocking idle creative potential and enhancing overall organizational effectiveness.

Practical implications

Organizations may wish to consider youth leadership development experiences as potential behaviorally based predictors of future job success for jobs that require creativity. Organizational decision makers should also carefully consider making leadership development opportunities available to organizational members at all levels.

Originality/value

The study is among the first to examine both adult and youth leadership development as potential facilitators of creativity in organizations and has value for practitioners as well as for future creativity and leadership development researchers.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2013

Daniel N. Karanja

A youthful sub-Saharan Africa presents fertile grounds to nurture a new breed of inspirational and resilient leadership that could transform the continent for decades to…

Abstract

A youthful sub-Saharan Africa presents fertile grounds to nurture a new breed of inspirational and resilient leadership that could transform the continent for decades to come. Population statistics indicate that 44% of sub-Saharan Africa’s population is less than 15 years old. The timing is ripe to infuse transformational leadership skills targeting the youth to build sustainable peace. The most potent force of change in Africa today is her youthful, progressive, and courageous population. A renewed sense of patriotism, nationalism, and a brighter Africa abound with hope and prosperity is in the hands of the youth. The United States President Barack Obama recently said, “… You have the power to hold your leaders accountable, and to build institutions that serve the people. You can serve in your communities, and harness your energy and education to create new wealth and build new connections to the world. But these things can only be done if all of you take responsibility for your future” (Remarks by President Obama to the Ghanaian Parliament, July 11, 2009). This chapter incorporates the principles and power of appreciative inquiry, moral imagination, and moral leadership to offer the African Youth inspiration for fresh leadership. The overall outcome will be a discourse toward an African Youth Theory of Inspirational Servant Leadership.

Details

Collective Efficacy: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on International Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-680-4

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Article
Publication date: 16 April 2020

Lindsay Lyons and Marc Brasof

The purpose of this paper is to understand the organizational mechanisms by which schools can increase opportunities for student leadership.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the organizational mechanisms by which schools can increase opportunities for student leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the student voice literature conducted in high schools was used to identify organizational mechanisms for enhancing student leadership.

Findings

Five leadership-fostering organizational mechanisms were identified: consistency, research, group makeup, governance structure and recognition.

Originality/value

This paper examines the existing body of student voice research to identify organizational mechanisms for fostering student leadership in schools. Researchers can use this to operationalize student leadership mechanisms and study their impact. Practitioners can implement these mechanisms in schools to support youth leadership development.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 58 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Book part
Publication date: 17 July 2014

Miriam Galipeau and Audrey R. Giles

In this chapter we examine cross-cultural mentorship within Alberta’s Future Leaders (AFL) program, an initiative in which mainly non-Aboriginal youth workers and arts…

Abstract

Purpose

In this chapter we examine cross-cultural mentorship within Alberta’s Future Leaders (AFL) program, an initiative in which mainly non-Aboriginal youth workers and arts mentors mentor Aboriginal youth in Aboriginal communities in Alberta through the use of sport, recreation, and arts for development.

Design/methodology/approach

We use an exploratory case study methodology in concert with semi-structured interviews, focus groups, participant observation, and archival research. We use Foucauldian discourse analysis to analyze our results.

Findings

We identified two dominant discourses that shape AFL: first, mentorship can help Aboriginal youth to avoid negative life trajectories and, second, youth leadership development is universal. We argue that sport, recreation, and arts for youth development that does not prioritize cultural relevancy and does not attend to issues pertaining to colonialism’s legacy risks, in a Foucauldian sense, disciplining Aboriginal youths in ways that reaffirm colonial relations of power between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people.

Originality/value

This chapter focuses on sport, recreation, and arts for youth development within a marginalized segment of the Canadian population: Aboriginal youth.

Details

Sport, Social Development and Peace
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-885-3

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