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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2009

Caroline Ritchie, Felix Ritchie and Richard Ward

The purpose of this paper is to investigate drinking patterns; attitudes towards alcohol consumption and alcohol‐related behaviours amongst differing groups of young

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate drinking patterns; attitudes towards alcohol consumption and alcohol‐related behaviours amongst differing groups of young adults. A further aim is to investigate whether the drinking behaviours of undergraduate populations can be considered to be representative of young adult behaviours in general.

Design/methodology/approach

Four groups of young adult alcohol consumers are identified. The participants in the first two groups are aged between 18 and 23, one group being undergraduates and the second non‐graduates in work. Participants in the second two groups are aged between 24 and 29, one group comprising graduates in work, the second non‐graduates in work. 120 questionnaires were completed; 30 in each sample group, with an even gender distribution. Follow up one‐to‐one interviews are carried out with representatives from each group.

Findings

Although a small study it is evident that whilst there are some similarities in behaviours between the differing sample groups significant differences in alcohol‐related behaviours dominate.

Practical implications

The results suggest that utilising the results of research carried out amongst student populations to inform government policies with regard to the behaviour of young adults in general is unlikely to be successful in changing drinking behaviours.

Originality/value

This paper produces new insights into current drinking cultures and attitudes towards drinking in differing groups of young adults. Specifically, it compares behavioural norms between graduate and non‐graduate populations challenging much current research which is based upon student samples as being representative of the young adult population as a whole.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2019

Gina Gaio Santos, Ana Paula Ferreira and José Carlos Pinho

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact of career attitudes (traditional career vs boundaryless career) on perceived employability (internal vs external…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact of career attitudes (traditional career vs boundaryless career) on perceived employability (internal vs external employability). In addition, the authors examine whether career self-management strategies act as mediators of these relationships. Due to high unemployment rates in the last two decades, it is important to assess the extent to which young graduates’ career attitudes affect perceived internal and external employability, along with the role of career self-management strategies as an employability enhancement tool.

Design/methodology/approach

As part of a cross-sectional research design, the authors administered a survey questionnaire to a sample of 131 graduates (i.e. master’s students) with at least one year of work experience. The empirical data were analyzed with partial least squares structural equation modeling, which combines confirmatory factor analysis, multiple linear regression and path analysis.

Findings

The results reveal that there is a positive and significant impact (direct effect) of a traditional career attitude (TCA) on internal employability, while there is no significant negative impact of a TCA on external employability. Additionally, the results show that there is a negative impact (direct effect) of a boundaryless career attitude (BCA) on internal employability, while no significant positive impact is found of a BCA on external employability. This study also confirms the mediation effect (full mediation) of career positioning strategies on the BCA-external employability relationship, and a partial mediation of career influence strategies on the TCA-internal employability relationship.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of this study relate to the sample size and the use of a convenience sampling technique. Hence, some caution is needed regarding results’ generalization. In addition, this research uses a cross-sectional design, thus the authors cannot assess longitudinal causal relationships between variables. Future research should be replicated with different types of respondents and in different cultural contexts.

Practical implications

The results suggest that organizations would benefit more from employees that hold a TCA than those that hold a BCA, especially if they are interested in fostering the internal employability of their workforce. At the individual level, the results identify optimal career self-management strategies (internal vs external employability) for young graduates.

Originality/value

This study offers new empirical evidence of the predictive value of perceived internal vs external employability and the mediating role of career self-management strategies in explaining employability. Young graduates perceive a TCA as more advantageous than a BCA for both internal and external employability. This is an unexpected but interesting finding, since the bulk of the literature on contemporary career attitudes overemphasizes the advantages of a BCA, while disregarding potential disadvantages for both individuals and organizations.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 42 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2017

James Uffindell

The paper explores how to bridge the gap between graduates/students and employers.

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390

Abstract

Purpose

The paper explores how to bridge the gap between graduates/students and employers.

Design/methodology/approach

Industry experience “What do the brightest graduates want?”, Bright Network Research Report 2017/18.

Findings

A concerning divide between what students believe employers are looking for in employees and what employers are actually looking for. Need for better communication between graduate employers and graduates.

Originality/value

With the job market rapidly changing and a growing disconnect between employers and graduates, this paper looks at how employers can better engage with graduates to bridge this gap and attract and retain bright recruits.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Karin Maria Staffansson Pauli

The purpose of the paper is to create an understanding of the gender structure in the real-estate industry in Sweden. Interviews were made with younger female and male…

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843

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to create an understanding of the gender structure in the real-estate industry in Sweden. Interviews were made with younger female and male graduates. The purpose is to distinguish how these younger graduates working in the industry react to the gender structure.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 12 graduate younger women and men working in the real-estate industry in Sweden. As an input to the interviews a mapping of the gender structure was conducted, using annual reports of commercial real-estate companies and public housing companies in Sweden.

Findings

The paper provides empirical insights that there were not any greater differences in the gender structure in Sweden, between 2001 and 2008 and none of the respondents were surprised. The symbols of men and the hegemonic masculinity – men more often holding leading and technical positions while women more often hold supporting positions in the industry – are important to understand the gender structure. In the industry the hegemonic engineering masculinity is also apparent.

Research limitations/implications

The limitation of the paper might be the time period of the mapping; a longer time period might have shown a change in the structure and the amount of young female and male graduates interviewed.

Practical implications

The paper includes implication for the development of the gender structure – awareness is the first step, in order to retain talented women and men.

Originality/value

The paper fulfils an identified need to study the gender structure of the real-estate industry.

Details

Property Management, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 16 April 2020

Doreen McGunagle and Laura Zizka

One of the goals of educational institutions is to prepare their graduates to be workplace-ready. The purpose of this paper is to identify the employability skills lacking…

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1569

Abstract

Purpose

One of the goals of educational institutions is to prepare their graduates to be workplace-ready. The purpose of this paper is to identify the employability skills lacking in the Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) industry from employers' perspectives to assist STEM educational institutions in creating more relevant programs inclusive of employability skills.

Design/methodology/approach

This study addresses 16 job-specific skills based on data deriving from the responses of 250 Human Resource Managers (HRMs) who represent five manufacturing industries (Aerospace and Defense, Automotive, Consumer Products, Electronics and Industrial Manufacturing) located in five regions (Northeast, Midwest, Southeast, West-Mountain and Pacific) of the United States.

Findings

The median scores for all 16 skills confirmed their importance for employability in the five manufacturing industries. The five highest ranking skills were team player, self-motivation, verbal communication, problem-solving and being proactive, which align with previous studies on workplace skills.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is a call to all STEM educational institution stakeholders, both internal and external, to re-assess current curriculum and programs and collaborate to narrow the gap between graduate competencies and the practical needs of the workplace.

Originality/value

This paper attempts to bridge the gap between the competencies gained in STEM educational institutions and the competencies needed for the future workplace, as confirmed by HRM professionals. Although this study is focused on STEM educational institutions in the United States, it will be of interest to all STEM educational institutions worldwide who play a significant role in preparing the next generation of employees for the global workplace.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1985

Terry Farnsworth

Any company wishing to survive in today's fiercely competitive markets must make the best use of its human resources: well‐motivated employees are a crucial asset. One of…

Abstract

Any company wishing to survive in today's fiercely competitive markets must make the best use of its human resources: well‐motivated employees are a crucial asset. One of the most searching tests of an executive's leadership abilities comes when he is required to manage newly‐recruited graduatesyoung people with no experience of business but with considerable potential, and of whom much is expected. How can such persons be managed so that they fulfil their promise, to the mutual benefit of themselves and their employers? The following checklist covers ten key points.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2019

Jonathan Winterton and Jason J. Turner

The purpose of this paper is to understand the concept of graduate work readiness (GWR) from a stakeholder perspective. The research attempts to pull together the various…

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1336

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the concept of graduate work readiness (GWR) from a stakeholder perspective. The research attempts to pull together the various multidisciplinary themes from the literature into a comprehensive analysis of the relationship between graduates and the labour market, considering the international dimension of what is a global phenomenon.

Design/methodology/approach

The critical review is divided into four distinct sections, the first is to contextualise the concept of GWR and graduate employability taking into account recent academic discussion, particularly in the EU and ASEAN; second, to explore the different perspectives of stakeholders in the “triple helix” of universities, governments and the corporate world; third, critically to assess the arguments that educational provision is poorly aligned with labour market needs; and finally, to investigate the implications of the fourth industrial revolution for graduate jobs and skills and propose an agenda for future research.

Findings

Despite the apparent consensus between stakeholders over the central importance of graduate employability, there is considerable diversity in how each imagines GWR is best assured.

Research limitations/implications

Any review is limited by the extant literature and whilst it is not uncommon that most research has been done in North America, Western Europe and Australasia, this is a serious limitation. GWR is a global concern and this review shows the need for more research that extends beyond the dominant geographical focus and its attendant paradigms. The implication is that geography is important and local research is needed to develop solutions that fit specific cultural, economic and institutional contexts.

Practical implications

The paper highlights the need to reconcile different stakeholder perspectives on GWR and ensure that they work together on shared agendas to improve graduate transition to the labour market. At the same time, the profound changes being brought about by the fourth industrial revolution suggest that more attention should be paid to the employability of existing employees.

Originality/value

This review should prove useful to both academics and practitioners because it emphasises the need to treat GWR as a concept that varies according to context and stakeholder interests, rather than a homogeneous phenomenon.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 61 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 30 April 2010

Steven Lenaers

Several Flemish social scientists argue for the existence of a dual Flemish labour market as a result of ethnic stratification. Flanders is the Northern, Dutch speaking…

Abstract

Purpose

Several Flemish social scientists argue for the existence of a dual Flemish labour market as a result of ethnic stratification. Flanders is the Northern, Dutch speaking region of Belgium, which inhabits around six million people. The poor educational level of ethnic minority youngsters is generally considered to be one of the main explaining factors. The purpose of this paper is to find out whether ethnic minority graduates, who have successfully completed their higher education, also face ethnic stratification in the labour market, even though the educational argument does not apply. Therefore, the paper examines differences in labour market positions of the third (Italian) and the second (Turkish and Moroccan) generation immigrants, and a matching Flemish ethnic majority control group.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is essentially of a quantitative nature. A postal survey was used to ask recently graduated ethnic minority and majority students from two schools of higher education and one university in Flanders about their career on the labour market after graduation. Universities provide education leading to master diplomas whereas schools of higher education train professional bachelors.

Findings

The waiting period between leaving school and entering the labour market is longer for ethnic majority graduates than for ethnic minority graduates. However, once on the labour market the differences in labour market position tend to disappear. Differences in first job wage, contract modalities, labour regime or the executive character of the job were small and non‐significant. Yet 61 per cent of the graduates of Turkish and Moroccan origin feel they have to try harder both in gaining access to the labour market and once in employment.

Research limitations/implications

Further studies will need to confirm these findings, perhaps even with ethnic minorities of other educational levels, in other locations.

Practical implications

The results suggest that closer attention should be paid to the psychological dimension of the school‐to‐work transition of ethnic minority graduates as their psychological contract is under pressure. As they feel their efforts are not sufficiently rewarded – since they feel they have to try harder than others and are rewarded the same – chances are they will reduce their efforts.

Originality/value

The paper focuses on the under‐researched area of ethnic stratification among higher educated graduates. Moreover, it is not limited to factual labour market positions. The inclusion of subjective variables such as opportunity perception and self‐confidence allows additional insight in existing differences and similarities.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1986

Jane Beck

What do you do when the restaurant manager appears at your bedroom door late at night with a bottle of champagne and a matching sparkle in his eye? There are many replies…

Abstract

What do you do when the restaurant manager appears at your bedroom door late at night with a bottle of champagne and a matching sparkle in his eye? There are many replies to that question, some more polite than others. This situation is difficult to cope with in normal business environments, but more so when you have a ‘living‐in’ job, a junior position, and the person being discouraged may be involved in your annual appraisal.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2018

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

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154

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

Future prosperity in Singapore’s manufacturing sector could depend on attracting graduates and other young people to pursue a career within the industry. However, this represents a more expensive alternative for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) that rely heavily on cheap foreign labor to compete on cost.

Practical Implications

The paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world’s leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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