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Book part
Publication date: 17 June 2022

Deborah Smart

The most recent research on the prevalence of young caring in secondary school–age children (Joseph et al., 2019) suggests that one in five 11–16 year olds have a caring…

Abstract

The most recent research on the prevalence of young caring in secondary school–age children (Joseph et al., 2019) suggests that one in five 11–16 year olds have a caring role. There are inherent challenges with identifying children and young people (CYP) who have caring responsibilities; they find themselves in the role because of love for a family member, as well as the lack of provision to meet the needs of the person they are caring for (Keith & Morris, 1995), not because they have consciously chosen to become a carer, and so do not identify with the concept (Smyth, Blaxland, & Cass, 2011). School can be both precarious and a place of sanctuary for young carers (Becker & Becker, 2008). Experiences of education, as with many aspects of caring, exist on a continuum with no young carers’ educational experience being the same (Dearden & Becker, 2003). Schools have a pivotal role in identifying, understanding and supporting young carers to prevent their education from being adversely affected.

Details

Understanding Safeguarding for Children and Their Educational Experiences
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80262-709-1

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 8 February 2021

Steve Walker and Mette Bunting

In this chapter, we will look at how the indirect approach can enable us to find a way to learn about young people's lives. The setting for this chapter is informal youth…

Abstract

In this chapter, we will look at how the indirect approach can enable us to find a way to learn about young people's lives. The setting for this chapter is informal youth work, reminding us of the value of a wide range of practices with young people, and the findings are equally relevant to formal and informal education as guiding principles for good practice. We will look at the skillful interactions practitioners establish with young people and how they can be developed and promoted. Reflective practice for practitioners is identified as beneficial in adding the value of young people's voice, whilst building relationships. The nature of young people's participation and power is argued to benefit from a co-constructed and socio-cultural understanding; majoring on the importance of context, indirect method and equality literacy framework. We will suggest how the indirect approach can improve young people's lives in schools and/or youth provision.

Details

Combatting Marginalisation by Co-creating Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-451-6

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Article
Publication date: 20 October 2022

Melissa Cain, Danika Rhiannon Blackstock, Melissa Fanshawe, Mahadeo Sukhai and Ainsley Latour

The purpose of this article is to understand the role and value of mentorship for young people with blindness and low vision (BLV) through their education and work journey…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to understand the role and value of mentorship for young people with blindness and low vision (BLV) through their education and work journey and to provide a conceptual framework for developing mentoring opportunities for young people with BLV.

Design/methodology/approach

Experiences of formal and informal mentorship were gathered within two distinct groups: adolescents with BLV in Australia and young adults with BLV in Canada. Qualitative data were collected from semi-structured individualized interviews regarding the experiences, understanding, and valuing of mentorship within these groups.

Findings

Results indicate the importance of informal role models and formal mentors within the lives of participants and how these become more refined and specific over time. Australian students valued role models as examples of success and inspiration for their own goals. Canadian mentees desired mentors as examples of personal lived experiences and providers of career-specific advice.

Originality/value

The study is original in its focus on the role of mentors for young people with blindness or low vision.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 15 September 2022

Annalisa Dordoni

The retail sector is not largely studied in Italy. The study offers a comparison between youth retail shift work in Milan and London. The aim of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

The retail sector is not largely studied in Italy. The study offers a comparison between youth retail shift work in Milan and London. The aim of this paper is to contribute to the debate on the one hand on youth work and on the other hand to the debate on agency and structural factors in life planning, representation of the future and the transition to adulthood, observed in the United Kingdom's and Italian labour market. Even if the second one is a Southern European Country, these contexts are both characterised by a service-oriented economy and the widespread of precarious and flexible jobs.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative methods were used: one year of ethnographic observation, 50 interviews and two focus groups were carried out between 2015 and 2018 with retail workers and trade unionists. The contexts are Corso Buenos Aires in Milan, Italy, and Oxford Street in London, United Kingdom. Analysing young workers' discourses, the author identifies narratives that allow to grasp their present agency and imagined future.

Findings

Observing the crisis of the narrative (Sennett, 2020) allows to highlight the social consequences of working times on young workers' everyday life and future. The author argues that young workers struggle with the narrative of their present everyday life and the representation of the future. This relates to the condition of time alienation due to the flexible schedules and the fast pace of work in retail, both affecting the work-life balance.

Originality/value

The social consequences of flexible schedules in retail and fast fashion sector, which are new issues not yet sufficiently explored, are here investigated from the perspective of young workers. The study is focussed on the representations of young people working with customers in social and economic contexts characterised by flexible schedules and the deregulation of shop openings, the so-called 24/7 service society, not largely investigated in the sociological scientific literature, above all in the Italian context.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 42 no. 13/14
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 27 September 2022

Fahad Ali Hakami

This study aims to identify and measure the lexical gap between the old and young generations in the Jizani dialect and determine the causes of that gap.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify and measure the lexical gap between the old and young generations in the Jizani dialect and determine the causes of that gap.

Design/methodology/approach

A 20-item questionnaire was distributed randomly among 104 participants. Next, 12 participants were selected and interviewed. SPSS software was used to analyse the quantitative data from the questionnaire. The data elicited from the interviews was qualitatively analysed, considering age and gender factors.

Findings

The major findings revealed that a lexical gap between old and young language speakers in the Jizani dialect exists. The gap between young females and the older generation was greater than that between young and old males. Some old words are likely to disappear in the coming decades. Social media, which is a time-consuming and word-borrowing medium for young people, was one of the reasons, besides the tendency of females to use prestigious words.

Originality/value

This study attempted to find the differences between the vocabularies of old and young speakers. If it does exist, is it significant? What are the reasons for this lexical gap? This will help other researchers and dialectologists register the old words before they die out and try to bridge that lexical gap.

Details

Saudi Journal of Language Studies, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2634-243X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2008

Diana Barron and Angela Hassiotis

There is now a vast amount of available information, research and policy on the transition of young people with learning disabilities to adulthood. These sources are…

367

Abstract

There is now a vast amount of available information, research and policy on the transition of young people with learning disabilities to adulthood. These sources are informed by different professional philosophies and practices, resulting in a heterogeneous mass of data that can be confusing, contradictory and repetitive. In this review we provide an overview of recent publications about services for young people with learning disabilities at the time of transition, with particular focus on those with mental disorders including neurodevelopment disorders and/or challenging behaviour. We discuss their relevance to good practice and the implications for the future development of services for people with learning disabilities in the UK. We argue that, despite the qualitative differences between the experience of transition to adulthood for young people with learning disabilities and that of other young people, the principles of service provision remain the same. Developments in research and clinical practice in this field ought to reflect good practice, as well as embracing new methodologies, and benefit from advances in adolescents without learning disabilities.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-0180

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Article
Publication date: 27 November 2009

Emilie Smeaton

Recent research has shown that children and young people are living on the streets in the UK with no support from family or other institutions and very few options for…

Abstract

Recent research has shown that children and young people are living on the streets in the UK with no support from family or other institutions and very few options for legitimate support, often resorting to dangerous survival strategies that put them at risk from others wishing to harm or exploit them. Many children and young people turn to the streets while still living with parents or carers to escape abuse in the home or because they do not receive attention and care. Integration of the homeless and non‐homeless populations sometimes plays a part in how children or young people find themselves on the streets. Becoming part of a gang, whether formed by groups of homeless people or those from the non‐homeless population, is an important survival strategy when on the streets. Once children and young people reach 16, the range of options for support widens and they become eligible to access services for homeless adults which are often not appropriate for them. Where prevention is not possible, there should be a response to children and young people's needs through outreach work, drop‐in centres and accommodation that operate in an informal way and have the capacity to respond to further requests for support.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2007

Caroline Day and Chris Paul

In recent years the political and practice climates have changed greatly, towards a focus on preventing negative experiences and vulnerability in the lives of children and…

Abstract

In recent years the political and practice climates have changed greatly, towards a focus on preventing negative experiences and vulnerability in the lives of children and young people, but at present many efforts suffer from two defects: they apply adult treatment ideas to young people, and they are not joined‐up responses. The article argues that young people are different from adults, having not yet established set patterns of behaviour, and that this offers a chance to intervene before the point of crisis. While they may misuse drugs and alcohol, in the main this is symptomatic of other problems that they need our support to face, which can be offered most effectively by services that are holistic and integrated, and which deal first with their emotional and family needs while also addressing personal development and vocational skills and training. These interventions need to begin well before the current housing crisis points around age 16 or 17.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Michelle Duffin

How confused are young people about cannabis reclassification? Who do they really trust when talking about drink and drugs? Do they believe the health warnings and ‘the…

Abstract

How confused are young people about cannabis reclassification? Who do they really trust when talking about drink and drugs? Do they believe the health warnings and ‘the messages’ to stay away from drugs? Michelle Duffin draws on her national discussions with young people to explore their perceptions of drugs and alcohol and to assess their awareness of young people services and preferred methods and sources of information for drugs and alcohol.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

Article
Publication date: 2 December 2014

Naomi Russell and Jennifer Taylor

The purpose of this paper is to describe the work of the Children and Young People's Programme of Time to Change, which is England's biggest campaign to end the stigma and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the work of the Children and Young People's Programme of Time to Change, which is England's biggest campaign to end the stigma and discrimination that surrounds mental health.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws upon research into the nature and effects of mental health stigma and discrimination on young people and also outlines the strategy of the Time to Change campaign and its initial outcomes.

Findings

The paper includes testimonies from young people with lived experience of mental health problems about the stigma and discrimination they have faced. It also outlines the aims, objectives and stages of implementation of the Time to Change Children and Young People's Programme. The paper particularly focuses on the campaign work undertaken in secondary schools, the social leadership programme for young people with lived experience of mental health problems and the process of designing effective campaign messaging for social media.

Originality/value

Time to Change is England's biggest campaign to end the stigma and discrimination that surrounds mental health. This paper provides a unique insight into the process of developing and rolling out an anti-stigma campaign for young people.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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