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Book part
Publication date: 25 November 2019

Bernice Loh

Often seen as a vulnerable group, tween girls fashioning themselves after adults have been a topic of significant concern. Public and academic discourse in the West has…

Abstract

Often seen as a vulnerable group, tween girls fashioning themselves after adults have been a topic of significant concern. Public and academic discourse in the West has expressed worry that girls’ adult-like dressing may expose them to a range of physical, psychological and sexual harm. In most discussions on girls’ dressing, Western popular culture is also identified as one of the prevalent ways through which girls learn to how to fashion themselves after adults. It is claimed that Western television programmes, books and magazines encourage young girls to fashion themselves after adults at an earlier age. Recognising the importance of girls’ voices in their experiences of girlhood, this chapter draws exclusively on 12 focus groups, with 29 Singaporean girls aged 8–12. It finds that there are changing mediascapes in tween girls’ lives that have not been acknowledged. No longer predominantly watching television or browsing teen magazines, this chapter highlights how young Singaporean girls are now more likely to spend their time on the popular media platform YouTube. As girls gain mobility through their mobile communication devices, this chapter calls for a closer examination of YouTube in relation to girls’ dressing. Nonetheless, this chapter also acknowledges that while certain popular YouTube videos (re)produce highly narrow ideas of what a female should look or be like, it is not a simple issue of girls learning how to dress from their favourite YouTube stars. YouTubers also represented a lexicon of empowerment for some of the girls in this study.

Book part
Publication date: 11 November 2019

Steven J. Kendrat and Charisse L’Pree Corsbie-Massay

Since its launch in 2005, YouTube has provided a unique platform for users worldwide to share and engage with content, leading to a rise in user-generated content (UGC)…

Abstract

Since its launch in 2005, YouTube has provided a unique platform for users worldwide to share and engage with content, leading to a rise in user-generated content (UGC), especially among youth. One of the most prevalent, yet under-explored, subgenres of UGC is the user-generated music video, where users integrate music and images with an element of performance or narrative; the current research deploys longitudinal analysis to describe the trends in youth-created music videos and how these trends have evolved in the early years of YouTube. Using a sample of 100 youth-created user-generated music videos uploaded to YouTube in 2007 and 2013, the authors investigate trends in production strategies, narrative content, and demographics. Compared to videos posted in 2007, youth-created music videos posted in 2013 featured more complicated editing techniques, less linear narratives, younger actors, more women, and were more likely to celebrate the self, mimicking the recent emergence of “selfie culture.” These findings are discussed with respect to YouTube’s role in reducing barriers to entry and providing a virtual space for youth-oriented content communities that thrive on engagement and social networking as strategies of identity development.

Book part
Publication date: 19 November 2018

Sophie Bishop

The YouTube affordance of auto-generated textual closed captions (CC) is valued by the YouTube algorithm, and therefore spoken words in vlogs can be strategically used to…

Abstract

The YouTube affordance of auto-generated textual closed captions (CC) is valued by the YouTube algorithm, and therefore spoken words in vlogs can be strategically used to optimize and orient videos and channels for search. In their blog, YouTube suggests that complicity with their desire for rich and accurate CC is rewarded with algorithmic visibility (YouTube, 2017a). CC metadata are therefore an example of the significant degree of pressure for vloggers (video bloggers) on YouTube to optimize their content down to minutia of self-presentations. In this chapter I analyze the practice of highly visible beauty vloggers to conceptualize vlogging practices that contribute to algorithmically readable CC text. I term this labor vlogging parlance. Vlogging parlance includes keyword stuffing, defined as inserting often-searched-for keywords into speech. It also encompasses the strategic verbal expressions, language choice, speech pace, enunciation, and minimization of background noise by vloggers. Vlogging parlance can be thought of as a microcelebrity (Senft, 2008) technique, deployed to attract attention and visibility in an information-saturated online “attention economy,” a system of value in which often “money now flows along with attention” (Goldhaber, 1997). The call to optimize speech ultimately places responsibility onto creators to ensure their videos can become visible, while assisting YouTube in developing search accuracy for their viewers. Furthermore, the Western-centric language affordances of CC, and the high valuation of English on the YouTube platform, are used as examples of how social media platforms can underserve differently abled and non-English speaking audiences.

Details

Microcelebrity Around the Globe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-749-8

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Book part
Publication date: 1 October 2016

Christopher J. Schneider

The body of scholarship on YouTube is an expanding area of scholarly inquiry. Existent research indicates that music videos are one of the most salient features of YouTube

Abstract

The body of scholarship on YouTube is an expanding area of scholarly inquiry. Existent research indicates that music videos are one of the most salient features of YouTube. Interactionist research about popular music has provided important insights through interviews with fans and audience members; however, this work has yet to examine audience engagement with music videos on YouTube. Using Qualitative Media Analysis, I illustrate how the researcher of popular music can work with user comments collected from YouTube. Thematic understandings largely consistent with nostalgia that emerged from an analysis of user-generated comments in response to selected music videos on YouTube are explored. I conclude by suggesting some directions for future research.

Details

Symbolic Interactionist Takes on Music
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-048-0

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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2022

Linus T. Wilson

This study aims to analyze whether average video watch time or click-through rates (CTR) on YouTube videos are more closely associated with high numbers of views per…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to analyze whether average video watch time or click-through rates (CTR) on YouTube videos are more closely associated with high numbers of views per subscriber using linear regressions.

Design/methodology/approach

In 2018, YouTube began releasing CTR data to its video creators. Since 2012, YouTube has emphasized how it favors watch time over clicks in its recommendations to viewers. To the best of the author’s knowledge, this is the first academic study looking at that CTR data to test what matters more for views on YouTube. Is watch time or CTR more important to getting views on YouTube?

Findings

The author analyzed new video releases on YouTube. This paper finds almost no or limited evidence that higher percent audience retention or total average watch time per view, respectively, are associated with more views on YouTube. Instead, videos with higher CTR got significantly more views.

Originality/value

The author knows no other study that tests the relative importance of CTR or watch time per view in predicting views for new videos on YouTube.

Details

International Journal of Pervasive Computing and Communications, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-7371

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Article
Publication date: 16 June 2022

Snehasish Banerjee and Anjan Pal

This paper aims to explore Internet users' lived experiences with video ads, both skippable and nonskippable, while watching content on YouTube.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore Internet users' lived experiences with video ads, both skippable and nonskippable, while watching content on YouTube.

Design/methodology/approach

In-depth interviews were conducted with 22 participants.

Findings

The participants unanimously expressed dissatisfaction with YouTube ads. The dissatisfaction was directed to the platform but did not spill over to the advertised brand/product. Ethical concerns related to privacy also emerged. Specifically, with respect to nonskippable ads, the participants expressed dislike for forced viewing and explained how they would engage in extraneous activities during the ads. Nonetheless, they appreciated the flexibility offered by skippable ads. They also elaborated on how, why and when they would skip/not skip skippable ads.

Originality/value

The findings are discussed in light of the literature on not only online advertising but also platform switching versus continuance intention, spillover effect, privacy–personalization paradox and visual attention.

Details

Internet Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 24 January 2022

Yu Xiang

This paper aims to examine the recommendation system of the video-sharing website YouTube to study how control of users is effected on online platforms.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the recommendation system of the video-sharing website YouTube to study how control of users is effected on online platforms.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper conceptualises algorithmic systems as protocols – technological and social infrastructures that both facilitate and govern interactions between autonomous actors (Galloway and Thacker, 2004, 2007). It adopts a netnographic approach (Kozinets, 2002) to study not only the formal, technological systems of the platform but also the systems as they were made sense of, understood and enacted upon by actors. It relies both on information as revealed by the organisation itself, as well as discussions between lay users in online forums and press coverage.

Findings

The results of this study indicate that the ways in which platforms selectively facilitate interactions between users constitute a form of control. While maintaining the appearance of an open and neutral marketplace, interactions on the platform are in fact highly structured. The system relies on the surveillance of user interactions to rapidly identify and propagate marketable contents, so as to maximise user “engagement” and ad revenue. The systems place few demands or restrictions on individual users, instead control is effected in a probabilistic fashion, over the population of users as a whole, so as to, in aggregate, accomplish organisational goal.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature on accounting and control practices in online spaces, by extending the notion of control beyond overt rankings and evaluations, to the underlying technical and social infrastructures that facilitate and shape interactions.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 May 2021

Maya Deori, Vinit Kumar and Manoj Kumar Verma

The purpose of the study is to evaluate certain characteristics of the videos of the software Koha and DSpace posted on YouTube. Since YouTube has the potential to provide…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to evaluate certain characteristics of the videos of the software Koha and DSpace posted on YouTube. Since YouTube has the potential to provide the content creator to share their knowledge and experience through their content which has become much more beneficial to the information seeker. Nowadays, people search for queries or tutorial videos on YouTube very often to earn a better understanding of the term. Sentiment analysis of the viewers' opinion of the videos is another purpose of this study.

Design/methodology/approach

Dataset for evaluating the characteristic of the videos of Koha and DSpace was extracted by using Webometric Analyst by creating YouTube API. Once retrieval of data was completed, a manual verification was enhanced to filter out spam videos unrelated to the scope. After the confirmation of authentic relatable videos, seeking the video's id as query, the comments per video were extracted using Webometric Analyst. For opinion mining, the Parallel Dots API web service was used in Google Sheets as an addon function. The sentiment, multilingual sentiment, emotion, intention and word frequency of the viewers' opinion was examined with the help of certain default functionalities.

Findings

Webometric Analyst extracted a total of 461 and 397 videos of Koha and DSpace, respectively, uploaded on the YouTube platform. The findings of the study indicate that the growth rate of videos on Koha is decreasing, while the number of videos uploaded on DSpace is gradually increased in the last 10 years. The highest number of videos posted in 1–20 min duration category with mostly high definition (HD) with standard YouTube license and prominently in the English language. The sentiment analysis of the total extracted comments on Koha and DSpace videos found to be 2043 and 862 comments, respectively, among whom “Positive” comments are mostly found and with “Happy” emotion can be highly detected with most supportive “Feedback” intention on both Koha and DSpace videos. The top word frequency signifies that the users of both the software are using the comments section of the videos on YouTube to ask and provide troubleshooting help to each other.

Research limitations/implications

The present study has some limitations too; the dataset for the study includes only those videos whose title, description or keywords sections had the query terms “Koha” or “DSpace” there are chances that some videos would have been left out from the dataset related to these software.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to evaluate the characteristics and sentiment of both the videos Koha and DSpace. Through this, the popularity, likeness and dislike and the impact of the contents of the videos uploaded will be disclosed, and creators can make an improvement by referring this, and the seekers will adapt to the use of correct and authentic information.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 August 2021

Raja Ahmed Jamil and Abdul Qayyum

This study aims to compare the effects of YouTube information sources (influencer vs word of mouse) on the consumer purchase decision. This paper extends the information…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to compare the effects of YouTube information sources (influencer vs word of mouse) on the consumer purchase decision. This paper extends the information adoption model (IAM) to include information language as a central cue and skepticism toward online information as a moderating factor.

Design/methodology/approach

A between-subjects experiment, 2 (influencer vs word of mouse) × 2 (positive vs negative information), was designed to test hypotheses. A total of 171 consumers participated in the experiment and multigroup structural equations modeling (AMOS 21) was applied.

Findings

The results indicate that consumers perceive argument quality to be more useful when the information comes from word of mouse (WOMS). While information language was deemed more useful when the information source was a YouTube influencer and the information type was positive. The study also found that skepticism toward online information reduced the overall effects, particularly for influencers and positive information.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to the theory by identifying and investigating the existing gaps in knowledge. For practitioners, findings speak to the synergetic power of YouTube influencers and WOMS as an effective marketing strategy.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first to compare the effects of YouTube influencers and consumer comments by using the IAM. It also extends IAM with the inclusion of information language as a central cue and skepticism toward online information as a moderating factor.

Article
Publication date: 27 July 2021

Louisa Ha, Mohammad Hatim Abuljadail, Claire Youngnyo Joa and Kisun Kim

This study aims to examine the difference between personalized and non-personalized recommendations in influencing YouTube users’ video choices. In addition, whether men…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the difference between personalized and non-personalized recommendations in influencing YouTube users’ video choices. In addition, whether men and women have a significant difference in using recommendations was compared and the predictors of recommendation video use frequency were explored.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 524 Saudi Arabia college students was conducted using computer-assisted self-administered interviews to collect their video recommendation sources and how likely they follow the recommendation from different sources.

Findings

Video links posted on social media used by the digital natives were found as the most effective form of recommendation shows that social approval is important in influencing trials. Recommendations can succeed in both personalized and non-personalized ways. Personalized recommendations as in YouTube recommended videos are almost the same as friends and family’s non-personalized posting of video links on social media in convincing people to watch the videos. Contrary to expectations, Saudi men college students are more likely to use recommendations than women students.

Research limitations/implications

The use of a non-probability sample is a major limitation and self-reported frequency may result in over- or under-estimation of video use.

Practical implications

Marketers will realize that they may not need the personalized recommendation from the large site. They can use social media recommendations by the consumers’ friends and family. E-mail is the worst platform for a recommendation.

Social implications

Recommendation is a credible source and can overcome the avoidance of advertising. Its influence on consumers will be increasing in years to come with the algorithmic recommendation and social media use.

Originality/value

This is the first study to compare the influence of different online recommendation sources and compare personalized and non-personalized recommendations. As recommendation is growing more and more important with algorithm development online, the study results have high reference values to marketers in Islamic countries and beyond.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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