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Article
Publication date: 16 April 2018

Chonticha Kaewanuchit and Yothin Sawangdee

The occupational stress is a disadvantage resulting in mental health illnesses that have been found when looking at those migrants who were young adults and migrated to…

Abstract

Purpose

The occupational stress is a disadvantage resulting in mental health illnesses that have been found when looking at those migrants who were young adults and migrated to work in the urban areas, leaving behind their aging parents to live alone at home. The purpose of this paper is to compare the causal relationships of job stress between Thai immigrant employees with and without rearing aging parents.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was a cross-sectional survey. The sample for this study included 600 Thai immigrant employees (300 cases per group) in 2016. Measures included individual characteristics, working conditions, and a Thai Job Content Questionnaire (Thai-JCQ) on related job stress. The model was verified using a path model by Mplus software.

Findings

The distance traveled between the house and the workplace, wages, working conditions had a direct effect on job stress. Working conditions among Thai immigrants employees with rearing aging parents had the most direct effect on job stress with a standardized regression weight of 0.552 (p-value <0.05) as well as working conditions among their without rearing aging parents had the most direct effect on job stress with a standardized regression weight of −0.292.

Originality/value

This research demonstrated that working conditions were an important factor.

Details

Journal of Health Research, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2586-940X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 21 February 2020

Nyein Chan, Yothin Sawangdee, Umaporn Pattaravanich, Charamporn Holumyong and Aphichat Chamratrithirong

The total fertility rate in Myanmar stands low in comparison to neighboring countries. This decrease in the birth rate will lead to a decline in the number of young…

Abstract

Purpose

The total fertility rate in Myanmar stands low in comparison to neighboring countries. This decrease in the birth rate will lead to a decline in the number of young Burmese in the future, an issue that is of concern to the Myanmar government. The purpose of this study was to review the contributing factors to marriage and birth rates and to also review the use of contraception among married women.

Design/methodology/approach

This quantitative research study was based on cross-sectional secondary data available from the Myanmar Demographic and Health Survey 2015–2016. The study sample included 6,138 women of reproductive age.

Findings

The proportion of unmarried women and the mean age at the first marriage date in the early cohort was higher than that of the women who were born in the later cohort. The study shows that birth cohort, female labor force participation, migration, wealth index, and media exposure are significant in explaining marriage types and patterns (p < 0.05). The injection and the pill were the most popular contraceptive methods for both cohorts. Other methods such as intrauterine devices, implants, and condoms were not as popular.

Originality/value

This paper presents the birth cohort, female labor force participation, migration, wealth index, and media exposure as key factors for determining the timing of marriage.

Details

Journal of Health Research, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2586-940X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 January 2019

Kailash Timilsina, Yothin Sawangdee, Pojjana Hunchangsith and Jongjit Rittirong

The under-5 mortality rate in Nepal remains high in comparison to neighboring countries and developed nations. The result of this problem on Nepal’s social, economic…

Abstract

Purpose

The under-5 mortality rate in Nepal remains high in comparison to neighboring countries and developed nations. The result of this problem on Nepal’s social, economic, political and cultural development makes it an urgent priority requiring the Nepalese Government to address this issue. The purpose of this paper is to find out if Nepal’s high female labor force participation (FLFP), the caste system and no paid maternity leave are contributing factors to under-5 deaths in Nepal.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for this study were taken from Nepal’s cross-sectional demographic health survey 2016–2017. The study sample included 5,060 children born to 3,074 mothers in the five years preceding the survey. Data were collected by interviewing respondents via a structured questionnaire selected through stratified random sampling methods.

Findings

The study found that the hazard ratio for FLFP, the caste of the mother and paid maternity were 1.145, 1.485 and 0.556, respectively, with a p-value <0.001. Therefore, the risk of death in children under-5 years for a working mother, a Terai caste mother and a mother who did not get paid maternity was 14, 45 and 48 percent, respectively, higher than for non-working mothers, mothers from other castes and mothers who got paid maternity.

Originality/value

This research demonstrated that FLFP, the caste of the mother and paid maternity leave are important factors for determining the risk of death in children under the age of 5.

Details

Journal of Health Research, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2586-940X

Keywords

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