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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Haksik Lee, Yongki Lee and Dongkeun Yoo

Deals with three issues in the area of perceived service quality. First, it compares the gap model with the performance model. Second, it investigates the direction of…

Abstract

Deals with three issues in the area of perceived service quality. First, it compares the gap model with the performance model. Second, it investigates the direction of causality between service quality and satisfaction. Finally, it examines whether the influences of some dimensions of service quality vary across service industry types. Three service firms were selected and respondents were interviewed in each firm. As hypothesized, the performance model appeared to be superior to the gap model. In addition, the result shows that perceived service quality is an antecedent of satisfaction, rather than vice versa. Finally, tangibles appeared to be a more important factor in the facility/equipment‐based industries, whereas responsiveness is a more important factor in the people‐based industries. Managerial implications and future research directions are discussed.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2021

Antony King Fung Wong, Mehmet Ali Koseoglu and Seongseop (Sam) Kim

This study aims to examine the current state of the research activities of scholars in the hospitality and tourism field by analyzing the first 20 years of the new millennium.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the current state of the research activities of scholars in the hospitality and tourism field by analyzing the first 20 years of the new millennium.

Design/methodology/approach

Longitudinal analyses using 14,229 journal articles as data source were realized by adopting BibExcel, Gephi and VOSviewer network analysis software packages.

Findings

This study provides a comprehensive overview of the hospitality and tourism research based on authorship and social network analysis, with patterns of prolific authors compared over four distinct periods.

Research limitations/implications

The hospitality and tourism academic society is clearly illustrated by tracing academic publication activities across 20 years in the new millennium. In addition, this study provides a guide for scholars to search for multidisciplinary collaboration opportunities. Government agencies and non-governmental organisations can also benefit from this study by identifying appropriate review panel members when making decisions about hospitality- and tourism-related proposals.

Originality/value

To the best of authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to use bibliometric analysis in assessing research published in leading hospitality and tourism journals across the four breakout periods in the new millennium.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Martin O’Neill and Adrian Palmer

Reports on a program of research to learn more about the effects of survey timing on customers’ perceptions of service quality. Argues that an individual’s perceptions of…

Abstract

Reports on a program of research to learn more about the effects of survey timing on customers’ perceptions of service quality. Argues that an individual’s perceptions of service quality may not be stable over time and that suppliers should be particularly interested in consumers’ perceptions at the time that the next re‐purchase decision is made, rather than the period immediately following consumption. Reports empirical evidence on a number of studies from the hospitality, tourism and higher education sectors in Western Australia. States that results to date cast doubt on the wisdom of the traditional exit survey approach to service quality assessment. Warns that the information derived from the traditional exit survey may not necessarily bear any relation to the chances of converting one time customers into lifetime customers. It follows that the major pre‐occupation of many organisations with measuring perceptions during or immediately following service consumption may have little relevance to service quality perceptions which are important in subsequently forming future re‐purchase intentions.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

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