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1 – 10 of 53
Article
Publication date: 16 January 2023

Aoran Hong, Xia Li, Yonggui Wang and Mengting Shi

Export manufacturing firms from emerging markets can better meet customer needs by providing customization, which leads to competitive advantages. Although both practice and…

Abstract

Purpose

Export manufacturing firms from emerging markets can better meet customer needs by providing customization, which leads to competitive advantages. Although both practice and academic research have deeply discussed customization, the question of whether customization promotes export manufacturing firms' product innovation in the global B2B market is largely unexplored. The purpose of this paper is to address this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper collects survey data from 2,248 export manufacturing firms in China and uses hierarchical moderated regression to explore the relationship between customization and product innovation in the global B2B market and their boundary conditions.

Findings

This research shows that customization positively affects export manufacturing firms' product innovation in the context of the global B2B market, and it shows that internal governance structure (contract governance and relationship governance) and external governance structure (legal enforceability) can be used as boundary conditions that affect the relationship. Specifically, contract governance has an inverted U-shaped moderating effect on the relationship between customization and product innovation; moreover, relationship governance and legal enforceability can strengthen the positive relationship between customization and product innovation.

Originality/value

The study explores the relationship between customization and product innovation in the global B2B market and examines the moderating effect of internal and external governance structures. In addition, the study enriches the research related to customization and product innovation in the context of the global B2B market and provides essential practical insight into the survival of export manufacturing firms from emerging markets.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2022

Jin Sun, Jingshu Yang and Yonggui Wang

This paper aims to investigate the differential effects of vertical attributes and horizontal attributes on visit intention under proximal and distal sensory imagery in travel…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the differential effects of vertical attributes and horizontal attributes on visit intention under proximal and distal sensory imagery in travel live streams.

Design/methodology/approach

This research used a multimethod approach with four studies. Three designed experiments were first employed to prove casual relations of the hypothesized relations. Then, a structural model provided a new sample of the framework.

Findings

The results suggest that visit intention is higher when vertical (vs horizontal) attributes are associated with proximal (vs distal) sensory imagery. Physical presence mediates the interaction effects between attribute type and sensory imagery on visit intention.

Practical implications

The finding offers suggestions for multilateral information providers' capability of real-time advertising, seller-focused technology development and proactive relationship management with potential consumers.

Originality/value

Previous study is less sufficient to describe consumers' traveling interactivities in live-streaming media, where streamers are capable of modifying attribute-based messages and sensory modalities. Rather than focusing on imagery as a comprehensive modality or visual-dominated imagery, this study examines the interaction effects between attribute type and sensory imagery on visit intention. Drawing on reason-based choice and distance-on-distance theories, the finding enriches the evaluation of the effectiveness of live-streaming marketing across varying sensory interactions.

Article
Publication date: 23 December 2021

Myat Su Han, Daniel Peter Hampson and Yonggui Wang

This study aims to investigate whether or not the two facets of pride, hubristic and authentic, are associated with knowledge hiding.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate whether or not the two facets of pride, hubristic and authentic, are associated with knowledge hiding.

Design/methodology/approach

This study collects survey data (N = 343) from one of the leading information technology (IT) companies in Myanmar at two stages with a two-month interval. This study uses multiple regression analyses to test this study’s hypotheses.

Findings

Results reveal that hubristic pride is positively related to knowledge hiding, whereas the relationship between authentic pride and knowledge hiding is negative. These relationships are contingent upon the level of employees’ self-efficacy.

Research limitations/implications

This study suggests that managers should include measures for moral emotions in their recruitment and selection criteria. Furthermore, the authors suggest that managers should design strategies to induce moral emotions at the workplace and enhance personal resources (e.g. self-efficacy), which have an instrumental effect in maximizing the prosocial facet of pride (i.e. authentic pride) as well as minimizing adverse experiences of the antisocial facet of pride (i.e. hubristic pride), thereby reducing knowledge hiding.

Originality/value

The findings shed light on the significance of the inclusion of emotional variables in understanding employees’ knowledge hiding. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first empirical study to examine the combined effect of emotive and cognitive variables in predicting knowledge hiding by demonstrating that hubristic pride only mitigates knowledge hiding behavior among high self-efficacious employees.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 26 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 February 2023

Shuang Ma, Dahui Li, Yonggui Wang and Myat Su Han

This study aims to examine how three types of information technology (IT) capability (supplier technological capability, customer technology-sensing capability and relatedness of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine how three types of information technology (IT) capability (supplier technological capability, customer technology-sensing capability and relatedness of IT infrastructure) facilitate knowledge acquisition by the customer when the supplier is dominant in the supplier-customer relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The unit of analysis was project. The authors designed two different questionnaires that were responded by the project manager of an enterprise resource planning (ERP) software supplier and the contact person of the customer organization in the same project, respectively. The two questionnaires were matched by means of project name. The final sample included a total of 136 projects. The authors used ordinary least squares to test the research hypotheses.

Findings

The authors found that supplier power advantage negatively influenced knowledge acquisition by the customer. The three types of IT capability did not have direct impacts on knowledge acquisition. The moderating effect of customer technology-sensing capability was not significant either. However, supplier technological capability and relatedness of IT infrastructure attenuated the negative effect of supplier power advantage on knowledge acquisition, indicating that both factors promoted knowledge acquisition.

Originality/value

Knowledge acquisition is important for the success of software implementation in the supplier-customer relationship. There is limited evidence in the literature on how to apply externally oriented IT capability to enhance knowledge management, improve knowledge acquisition and manage the business relationship that is typically dominated by the software supplier. The authors provide evidence to examine related issues.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 27 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Guicheng Shi, Huimei Bu, Yuan Ping, Matthew Tingchi Liu and Yonggui Wang

This study aims to elucidate how different relationship investment efforts by a service firm affect its customers’ perceived relationship investment; to determine how perceived…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to elucidate how different relationship investment efforts by a service firm affect its customers’ perceived relationship investment; to determine how perceived relationship investment influences various dimensions of relationship strength; and to explore the moderating effects of customer innovativeness and complaint propensity on the relationship between the perceived relationship investment and relationship strength.

Design/methodology/approach

To minimize common method variance, data were collected from pairs of life insurance agents in China and their clients using self-report questionnaires. Hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results indicate that customers value financial effort most followed by social effort and structural effort. Perceived relationship investment influences the affective strength most strongly, followed by cognitive strength and conative strength. Customer innovativeness and complaint propensity both moderate the effectiveness of perceived relationship investment in influencing two of the three dimensions of relationship strength.

Originality/value

This study is among the first to specify how service employees can guide consumer perceptions of relationship investment by applying three types of relationship investment effort. The impact of perceived relationship investment on different dimensions of relationship strength was assessed to demonstrate how service providers can benefit from investing in building consumer relationships. The moderating impact of consumer innovativeness and of complaint propensity was quantified. The research findings have important implications for managing different relationship investment as well as recruiting and training service employees.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 January 2020

Yonggui Wang, Daniel Peter Hampson and Myat Su Han

This study aims to examine the positive and negative consequences of relationship closeness between salespersons and their business customers in a B2B sales context: sales…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the positive and negative consequences of relationship closeness between salespersons and their business customers in a B2B sales context: sales performance and salesperson passive opportunism.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the social exchange theory, the authors develop a conceptual model of positive and negative consequences of relationship closeness. The authors empirically test the model using matched survey data from 269 salesperson-sales supervisor dyads and individual sales performance ratings from one of the largest distribution and market expansion companies in Myanmar.

Findings

Results provide evidence of positive (i.e. sales performance) and negative (i.e. salesperson passive opportunism) consequences of salesperson’s perceived relationship closeness. These relationships are, however, contingent on organization-level and employee-level factors. High extent of supervision enhances the effects of salesperson’s perceived relationship closeness on sales performance but attenuates its influence on salesperson passive opportunism. The effect of salesperson’s perceived relationship closeness on salesperson’s passive opportunism is stronger for salespersons with a promotion (vs prevention) focus.

Research limitations/implications

The results offer guidelines to firms seeking to optimize the efficacy of close relationships between their salespersons and customers. For example, higher levels of supervision could increase the likelihood of positive outcomes of relationship closeness while minimizing its negative consequences.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate not only the benefits of relationship closeness between salespersons and customers but also its dark side: the relationship closeness paradox.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 December 2017

Shuang Ma, Huimin Gu, Yonggui Wang and Daniel P. Hampson

The purpose of this paper is to identify the double-edged sword of customer involvement (perceived relationship quality and coordination cost) in new service development in the…

2850

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the double-edged sword of customer involvement (perceived relationship quality and coordination cost) in new service development in the hotel industry, and to explore when customers should be involved from the service provider’s view.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 252 valid questionnaires were collected from hotel managers, and ordinary least squares regression analysis was conducted to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Results not only show that customer involvement causes higher coordination cost but also show no direct positive effect on perceived relationship quality. Furthermore, this study finds that service climate reduces the negative effect of customer involvement and enhances its positive effect. By contrast, customer complexity intensifies the negative effect of customer involvement.

Originality/value

This study empirically examines the double-edged sword of customer involvement and tests the boundary conditions associated with hotel back and front office factors (service climate versus customer complexity).

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 September 2018

Yonggui Wang, Myat Su Han, Diandian Xiang and Daniel Peter Hampson

Despite managers’ investments in facilitating knowledge sharing, knowledge hiding remains prevalent in organizations. Existing studies shed light on the antecedents and…

2620

Abstract

Purpose

Despite managers’ investments in facilitating knowledge sharing, knowledge hiding remains prevalent in organizations. Existing studies shed light on the antecedents and consequences of knowledge hiding from the hider’s perspective. This study, the first, aims to examine the consequences of perceived knowledge hiding on the performance of knowledge seekers individually and organizations more broadly.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors develop a theoretical framework, drawing on self-determination theory (SDT) and social exchange theory (SET). The framework is tested empirically via hierarchical regression analyses, using survey data collected from salespersons (n = 296) and supervisors (n = 83) employed by one of the largest distribution and market expansion companies in Myanmar.

Findings

Consistent with SDT, the results show that perceived knowledge hiding exerts a positive effect on knowledge seekers’ individual sales performance, although this relationship is moderated by social interaction. Conversely, the results show a negative relationship between perceived knowledge hiding and team viability, which is moderated by reward structure, consistent with SET.

Research limitations/implications

The results have several strategic implications, including on the type of reward structures (i.e. individual vs team-based) that most effectively mitigate the negative consequences of perceived knowledge hiding.

Originality/value

This is the first empirical study of the consequences of perceived knowledge hiding. This model integrates two theoretical perspectives which highlight positive and negative consequences of perceived knowledge hiding.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 May 2020

Shuang Ma, Chao Zhang and Yonggui Wang

The purpose of this paper is to explore the transformation from service engagement through hotel consumption behavior to subsequent product purchases and identify marketing…

1139

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the transformation from service engagement through hotel consumption behavior to subsequent product purchases and identify marketing strategies to facilitate this transformation.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a 1.5-year data set of transactional data from a typical hotel firm, the authors examined 4,999 valid purchase events via ordinary least squares regression to test the hypotheses proposed.

Findings

Contrary to studies indicating that heavy hospitality users are resistant to external change, the authors found that hotel service engagement (in terms of recency, frequency and monetary value) significantly informed subsequent product purchases. Effects varied based on customized solutions and product purchase channel.

Practical implications

Product managers in hospitality should target customers who have recently patronized hotels as well as hotel customers with high monetary value and frequency. Managers can adopt distinct marketing strategies (e.g. customized solutions and purchase channels) to sell hotel customers more products.

Originality/value

Prior studies have framed the cross-selling of hospitality services as a vital revenue management strategy from hotel firms’ or frontline employees’ perspectives. However, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to test how hotels cross-sell tangible products by targeting customers engaging in hotel consumption and by examining two major product marketing strategies that may facilitate or hinder this cross-selling process.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 July 2024

Tariq Hameed Alvi, Hafiz Muhammad Siddaq Ilyas, Samia Tariq, Ahmad Qammar and Yonggui Wang

The study investigates the nature of an understudied yet salient relationship between perceived overqualification (POQ) and work alienation in project management. It employs…

Abstract

Purpose

The study investigates the nature of an understudied yet salient relationship between perceived overqualification (POQ) and work alienation in project management. It employs relative deprivation theory to propose two dimensions of the psychological contract, i.e. relational and transactional, as underlying mediating mechanisms and how empowering leadership mitigates the adverse effects of POQ.

Design/methodology/approach

To this end, in two waves, we surveyed 232 project members of three public-sector information and communication technologies (ICT) projects in Punjab, Pakistan. The data was analyzed using Partial Least Square Structural Equation Modeling (PLS-SEM).

Findings

The key findings are: (1) POQ leads to work alienation, (2) relational and transactional contracts mediate this relationship, and (3) empowering leadership can mitigate the adverse effects of POQ in project management settings.

Originality/value

This research adds valuable insights to the scant POQ literature in public-sector project management settings. It also contributes by identifying the mediating role of relational and transactional psychological contracts and the moderating role of empowering leadership to mitigate the adverse effects of POQ in these settings.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

1 – 10 of 53