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Article

Shuang Ma, Chao Zhang and Yonggui Wang

The purpose of this paper is to explore the transformation from service engagement through hotel consumption behavior to subsequent product purchases and identify…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the transformation from service engagement through hotel consumption behavior to subsequent product purchases and identify marketing strategies to facilitate this transformation.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a 1.5-year data set of transactional data from a typical hotel firm, the authors examined 4,999 valid purchase events via ordinary least squares regression to test the hypotheses proposed.

Findings

Contrary to studies indicating that heavy hospitality users are resistant to external change, the authors found that hotel service engagement (in terms of recency, frequency and monetary value) significantly informed subsequent product purchases. Effects varied based on customized solutions and product purchase channel.

Practical implications

Product managers in hospitality should target customers who have recently patronized hotels as well as hotel customers with high monetary value and frequency. Managers can adopt distinct marketing strategies (e.g. customized solutions and purchase channels) to sell hotel customers more products.

Originality/value

Prior studies have framed the cross-selling of hospitality services as a vital revenue management strategy from hotel firms’ or frontline employees’ perspectives. However, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to test how hotels cross-sell tangible products by targeting customers engaging in hotel consumption and by examining two major product marketing strategies that may facilitate or hinder this cross-selling process.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article

Yonggui Wang, Daniel Peter Hampson and Myat Su Han

This study aims to examine the positive and negative consequences of relationship closeness between salespersons and their business customers in a B2B sales context: sales…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the positive and negative consequences of relationship closeness between salespersons and their business customers in a B2B sales context: sales performance and salesperson passive opportunism.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the social exchange theory, the authors develop a conceptual model of positive and negative consequences of relationship closeness. The authors empirically test the model using matched survey data from 269 salesperson-sales supervisor dyads and individual sales performance ratings from one of the largest distribution and market expansion companies in Myanmar.

Findings

Results provide evidence of positive (i.e. sales performance) and negative (i.e. salesperson passive opportunism) consequences of salesperson’s perceived relationship closeness. These relationships are, however, contingent on organization-level and employee-level factors. High extent of supervision enhances the effects of salesperson’s perceived relationship closeness on sales performance but attenuates its influence on salesperson passive opportunism. The effect of salesperson’s perceived relationship closeness on salesperson’s passive opportunism is stronger for salespersons with a promotion (vs prevention) focus.

Research limitations/implications

The results offer guidelines to firms seeking to optimize the efficacy of close relationships between their salespersons and customers. For example, higher levels of supervision could increase the likelihood of positive outcomes of relationship closeness while minimizing its negative consequences.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate not only the benefits of relationship closeness between salespersons and customers but also its dark side: the relationship closeness paradox.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Article

Guicheng Shi, Huimei Bu, Yuan Ping, Matthew Tingchi Liu and Yonggui Wang

This study aims to elucidate how different relationship investment efforts by a service firm affect its customers’ perceived relationship investment; to determine how…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to elucidate how different relationship investment efforts by a service firm affect its customers’ perceived relationship investment; to determine how perceived relationship investment influences various dimensions of relationship strength; and to explore the moderating effects of customer innovativeness and complaint propensity on the relationship between the perceived relationship investment and relationship strength.

Design/methodology/approach

To minimize common method variance, data were collected from pairs of life insurance agents in China and their clients using self-report questionnaires. Hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results indicate that customers value financial effort most followed by social effort and structural effort. Perceived relationship investment influences the affective strength most strongly, followed by cognitive strength and conative strength. Customer innovativeness and complaint propensity both moderate the effectiveness of perceived relationship investment in influencing two of the three dimensions of relationship strength.

Originality/value

This study is among the first to specify how service employees can guide consumer perceptions of relationship investment by applying three types of relationship investment effort. The impact of perceived relationship investment on different dimensions of relationship strength was assessed to demonstrate how service providers can benefit from investing in building consumer relationships. The moderating impact of consumer innovativeness and of complaint propensity was quantified. The research findings have important implications for managing different relationship investment as well as recruiting and training service employees.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article

Shuang Ma, Huimin Gu, Yonggui Wang and Daniel P. Hampson

The purpose of this paper is to identify the double-edged sword of customer involvement (perceived relationship quality and coordination cost) in new service development…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the double-edged sword of customer involvement (perceived relationship quality and coordination cost) in new service development in the hotel industry, and to explore when customers should be involved from the service provider’s view.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 252 valid questionnaires were collected from hotel managers, and ordinary least squares regression analysis was conducted to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Results not only show that customer involvement causes higher coordination cost but also show no direct positive effect on perceived relationship quality. Furthermore, this study finds that service climate reduces the negative effect of customer involvement and enhances its positive effect. By contrast, customer complexity intensifies the negative effect of customer involvement.

Originality/value

This study empirically examines the double-edged sword of customer involvement and tests the boundary conditions associated with hotel back and front office factors (service climate versus customer complexity).

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article

Yonggui Wang, Myat Su Han, Diandian Xiang and Daniel Peter Hampson

Despite managers’ investments in facilitating knowledge sharing, knowledge hiding remains prevalent in organizations. Existing studies shed light on the antecedents and…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite managers’ investments in facilitating knowledge sharing, knowledge hiding remains prevalent in organizations. Existing studies shed light on the antecedents and consequences of knowledge hiding from the hider’s perspective. This study, the first, aims to examine the consequences of perceived knowledge hiding on the performance of knowledge seekers individually and organizations more broadly.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors develop a theoretical framework, drawing on self-determination theory (SDT) and social exchange theory (SET). The framework is tested empirically via hierarchical regression analyses, using survey data collected from salespersons (n = 296) and supervisors (n = 83) employed by one of the largest distribution and market expansion companies in Myanmar.

Findings

Consistent with SDT, the results show that perceived knowledge hiding exerts a positive effect on knowledge seekers’ individual sales performance, although this relationship is moderated by social interaction. Conversely, the results show a negative relationship between perceived knowledge hiding and team viability, which is moderated by reward structure, consistent with SET.

Research limitations/implications

The results have several strategic implications, including on the type of reward structures (i.e. individual vs team-based) that most effectively mitigate the negative consequences of perceived knowledge hiding.

Originality/value

This is the first empirical study of the consequences of perceived knowledge hiding. This model integrates two theoretical perspectives which highlight positive and negative consequences of perceived knowledge hiding.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Article

Daniel Peter Hampson, Shuang (Sara) Ma and Yonggui Wang

Global brands are attracted to emerging markets because of increasing wealth among their middle classes. However, amid increasing levels of consumer financial stress in…

Abstract

Purpose

Global brands are attracted to emerging markets because of increasing wealth among their middle classes. However, amid increasing levels of consumer financial stress in many emerging markets, evidence points towards increased preferences for domestic products. The purpose of this paper is to examine the psychological constructs that mediate and moderate the relationship between reduced perceived financial well-being (PFWB) and domestic product purchases.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors develop a model drawing from three theoretical perspectives: consumer stress and coping, consumer information processing and social identity theory. Hypotheses are tested via structural equation modelling and moderated mediation analyses using data from a survey of Brazilian consumers (n=1,043).

Findings

Results show that the positive relationship between reduced PFWB and domestic product purchases is partially mediated by perceived value of global brands and frugality descriptive norm. Further analyses demonstrate that consumer confidence moderates the mediating effects of perceived value of global brands and pro-social consumer ethnocentrism on the relationship between reduced PFWB and domestic product purchases.

Research limitations/implications

The antecedents of domestic product purchases identified in this study indicate opportunities for marketers of domestic and foreign products to respond to reduced PFWB, especially in relation to pricing, branding and communications. Future research should examine implications of PFWB on different populations, including other emerging markets, developed markets and lower-income consumers.

Originality/value

This study contributes to international marketing literature by examining the hitherto unexplored influence of reduced PFWB on domestic product purchases.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

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Article

Yonggui Wang, Zeng Zhang, Jianfeng Wang, Rui Sang and Weigang Zhang

A kind of the Z-6020/E-44 modified waterborne hydroxyl acrylate resin (Z-WEA) and its application in volatile organic compound-free waterborne coatings were prepared.

Abstract

Purpose

A kind of the Z-6020/E-44 modified waterborne hydroxyl acrylate resin (Z-WEA) and its application in volatile organic compound-free waterborne coatings were prepared.

Design/methodology/approach

The Z-6020/E-44 modified waterborne hydroxyl acrylate resin (Z-WEA) was obtained dropwise by adding a mixed solution of methyl methacrylate, n-butyl acrylate, hydroxyethyl methacrylate, acrylic acid and an initiator into a pre-prepared solution of isopropyl alcohol and E-44 and by semi-continuous solution polymerization, and this chain was further extended with organosiloxane (Z-6020) through graft copolymer, which was then neutralized with organic base and dispersed with water, with waterborne amino resin curing agent to form a film, and the properties were tested.

Findings

The results showed that when the dosage of initiator was 2.5% accounts for the total acrylic monomer, the hydroxyl content was 10%; the dosage of E-44 was 16%; the dosage of Z-6020 was 6%; the mass ratio of hard and soft monomer was 2.0:1; the neutralization was 100%; Z-6020/E-44 modified waterborne hydroxyl acrylate resin (Z-WEA) had excellent dispersion performance in water and storage stability; water absorption of cured film was 7.8%; pencil hardness reached 5H; adhesive force was 1 level; and the film was uniform and endowed with remarkable heat resistance, high gloss and good fullness.

Practical implications

This paper established a method to synthesize Z-6020/E-44 modified waterborne hydroxyl acrylate resin (Z-WEA) with green surfactants that can be used in the coatings, adhesives, finishing agents and so on.

Originality/value

This paper provides a method of preparing Z-6020/E-44 modified waterborne hydroxyl acrylate resin (Z-WEA) and with waterborne amino resin curing agent to form a film, and the film is uniform and endowed with remarkable heat resistance, high gloss and good fullness and meets the requirements of high-grade paint.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

Keywords

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Article

Yonggui Wang and Fei Liu

Based on the business-to-business context in the service industry, this study aims to address two balancing problems that a supplier firm may face in an integrated…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on the business-to-business context in the service industry, this study aims to address two balancing problems that a supplier firm may face in an integrated framework: the trade-off between the two-dimensional market orientations (MO) (i.e. proactive and responsive MO) and the trade-off between two categories of governance mechanisms (i.e. contractual governance [CG] and relational governance [RG]). In doing so, the contingent effects of the governance mechanisms on the relationships between two-dimensional MO and service innovation capability (SIC) are empirically examined and tested.

Design/methodology/approach

A dyadic questionnaire survey of 168 services outsourcing firms’ project managers and strategy managers was used to collect data, which was then used to test the hypotheses by conducting hierarchical regression analysis.

Findings

It was observed that CG weakens the positive relationship between proactive MO (PMO) and SIC, while the positive impact of responsive MO (RMO) on SIC is strengthened. By contrast, RG plays an inverted U-shaped moderating role in the positive relationship between PMO and SIC. Nevertheless, the hypothesis that RG has an inverted U-shaped moderating effect on the effectiveness of RMO is not supported.

Originality/value

Drawing on transaction cost economics and relational exchange theory, this study contributes to the existing literature on MO by revealing how CG and RG differentially shape the value of PMO and RMO.

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Article

Myat Su Han, Khola Masood, Dan Cudjoe and Yonggui Wang

Previous studies suggest that competitive psychological climate at workplace may influence employee's attitudes and behaviors. The purpose of this paper is to explore…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous studies suggest that competitive psychological climate at workplace may influence employee's attitudes and behaviors. The purpose of this paper is to explore whether competitive psychological climate leads to increased knowledge-hiding behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing upon the conservation of resources theory, we developed a conceptual model which we empirically tested using survey data collected from 296 salespersons from one of the largest distribution market expansion companies in Myanmar.

Findings

We performed hierarchical regression analyses on the data obtained from 296 salespersons to confirm our hypotheses: competitive psychological climate is positively related to knowledge hiding. This relationship becomes weaker when there is high level of organizational justice and high level of optimism.

Research limitations/implications

The findings shed light on the dark side of competitive psychological climate, such that it translates into knowledge hiding, which is not beneficial for favorable organizational outcomes. To mitigate that, management needs to focus on promoting organizational justice and recruit more optimistic employees.

Originality/value

Although there are many previous studies on competitive psychological climate and its positive and negative impacts, this paper, to the authors' best knowledge, is the first to study its specific effect on knowledge hiding in the sales context.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 42 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Article

Yonggui Wang, Hing‐P. Lo and Yer V. Hui

Although an increasing number of studies is being performed in the field of service management, less work is being done on an integrated framework of service quality and…

Abstract

Although an increasing number of studies is being performed in the field of service management, less work is being done on an integrated framework of service quality and product quality, especially that supported with evidence from developing countries. As a result, little is known about the distinction between service quality and product quality, their respective antecedents, and their distinctive contributions to performance in service industries in the developing world. Generalization of related findings from developed countries is not necessarily appropriate. Unlike most related studies that are based on evidence from developed countries, focuses attention on the distinction between, and respective antecedents of, service quality and product quality in the Chinese context. Gives much emphasis to the importance of a positive bank reputation. The findings are based on structural equation models developed by AMOS.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

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