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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2011

Yolanda Y.Y. Chan and E.W.T. Ngai

In light of the growth of internet usage and its important role in the field of e‐commerce, electronic word‐of‐mouth (eWOM) has been changing people's behavior and…

Abstract

Purpose

In light of the growth of internet usage and its important role in the field of e‐commerce, electronic word‐of‐mouth (eWOM) has been changing people's behavior and decisions. People count on other users' opinions and information; they sometimes even make offline decisions based on information acquired online. The purpose of this paper is to conceptualise eWOM activity from an input‐process‐output (IPO) perspective; propose a classification framework based on the identified academic literature; analyze eWOM literature in terms of quantitative development and qualitative issues that are useful to both academics and researchers; and provide directions and guidelines for future research studies in eWOM.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors performed a systematic literature review of peer‐reviewed published journal articles and examined the current state of knowledge on eWOM literature based on a comprehensive search of several leading databases. In total, 94 articles were identified that comprised contributions from different strands of eWOM research. The scope of this investigation was limited to the timeframe of 2000‐2009.

Findings

The present study finds that research in eWOM is relatively new and has evolved only during the last ten years. This ten‐year study is deemed to be representative of the available eWOM literature. It is also shown that many scholars have incorporated established theories to explain eWOM communication phenomena. The current study not only fills the current gap in eWOM research but also provides a roadmap in analyzing eWOM communications.

Practical implications

This study serves as a consolidated database that may be used to guide future research. It provides a structured approach to analyzing the literature and identifying trends and gaps in order to map out an appropriate agenda for eWOM research. The proposed integrated classification framework can serve as a roadmap for academic research.

Originality/value

This paper systematically reviews the current state of eWOM research. To contribute to the development of a more comprehensive database for eWOM research, a classification framework of the eWOM literature is presented, building on the IPO model, by summarizing and organizing prior research into three areas covering antecedents, processes, and consequences of eWOM. The authors further summarize the theories and models that previous scholars have applied to their studies.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2018

Pauline Eadie and Yvonne Su

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of disaster rehabilitation interventions on bonding social capital in the aftermath of Typhoon Yolanda.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of disaster rehabilitation interventions on bonding social capital in the aftermath of Typhoon Yolanda.

Design/methodology/approach

The data from the project are drawn from eight barangays in Tacloban City, the Philippines. Local residents and politicians were surveyed and interviewed to examine perceptions of resilience and community self-help.

Findings

The evidence shows that haphazard or inequitable distribution of relief goods and services generated discontent within communities. However, whilst perceptions of community cooperation and self-help are relatively low, perceptions of resilience are relatively high.

Research limitations/implications

This research was conducted in urban communities after a sudden large-scale disaster. The findings are not necessarily applicable in the rural context or in relation to slow onset disasters.

Practical implications

Relief agencies should think more carefully about the social impact of the distribution of relief goods and services. Inequality can undermine community level cooperation.

Social implications

A better consideration of social as well as material capital in the aftermath of disaster could help community self-help, resilience and positive adaptation.

Originality/value

This study draws on evidence from local communities to contradict the overarching rhetoric of resilience in the aftermath of Typhoon Yolanda.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 31 March 2020

Yolanda Ramírez, Julio Dieguez-Soto and Montserrat Manzaneque

The purpose of this paper is twofold: to know whether those firms that achieve greater efficiency from their intangible resources (intellectual capital) also obtain…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: to know whether those firms that achieve greater efficiency from their intangible resources (intellectual capital) also obtain greater performance; and to analyze the moderating role of family management on that relationship in small to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

Design/methodology/approach

This paper conducts an empirical study with different econometric models using a panel data sample of 6,132 paired firm-year observations from Spanish manufacturing SMEs in the period 2000–2013.

Findings

The findings suggest that intellectual capital efficiency is a key factor that allows the firm to achieve and maintain competitive advantages, obtaining greater performance. Additionally, this research also shows that the moderating role of family management can be a double-edged sword depending on the type of intangible resources.

Practical implications

This paper may give managers an insight in how to better utilize and manage intangible resources available in their firms to improve competitive advantage and ultimately firm performance. Additionally, on the basis of the Socioemotional Wealth perspective (SEW), this article argues that family-managed firms that focus on SEW preservation can enhance the impact of structural capital efficiency on performance.

Originality/value

This paper extends the prior literature by studying the joint effects of intellectual capital efficiency, distinguishing between human capital and structural capital efficiency, and family management on performance in the context of SMEs.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 70 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2017

Hong T.M. Bui, Yolanda Zeng and Malcolm Higgs

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between transformational leadership and employees’ work engagement based on fit theory. The paper reports an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between transformational leadership and employees’ work engagement based on fit theory. The paper reports an investigation into the way in which employees’ perceptions of transformational leadership and person-job fit affect their work engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

To test the authors’ hypotheses, the authors performed structure equation modeling with maximum likelihood estimation on Mplus with bootstrapping proposed by Hayes (2009) with data from 691 full-time employees in China.

Findings

The results indicate that transformational leadership has as significant influence on employees’ work engagement as person-job fit in China. Moreover, employees’ perception of person-job fit is found to partially mediate the relationship between transformational leadership and employees’ work engagement.

Research limitations/implications

There is a possible bias arising from the use of cross-sectional data. However, certain methods were implemented to minimize it, including survey design and data analysis.

Practical implications

The paper proposes a number of practical implications for policy makers, HR managers and transformational leaders relating to issues associated with improving levels of employee engagement.

Originality/value

The study contributes to developing leadership and engagement theory by examining a previously unexplored mediator – person-job fit – in a neglected cultural setting. This study promises to open new research avenues in this area.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 August 2020

Carlos Serrano-Cinca, Beatriz Cuéllar-Fernández and Yolanda Fuertes-Callén

Many indicators attempt to measure the social performance of a company from different perspectives. Grounded in stakeholder theory, this paper aims to propose capitalising…

Abstract

Purpose

Many indicators attempt to measure the social performance of a company from different perspectives. Grounded in stakeholder theory, this paper aims to propose capitalising the economic value distributed annually to society over a period of time, hereafter called a firm’s cumulative contribution to society (CCS). This can be done by including everything that stakeholders value; for example, payments of taxes, remuneration of employees, payments to suppliers and creditors, donations, dividends, research and development expenses and efforts to improve the environment.

Design/methodology/approach

First, this paper makes a methodological proposal about how to calculate the CCS and discusses potentials and shortcomings. Then, a set of hypotheses are formulated about the firm characteristics and country attributes that make the most positive contribution to society such as business models, financial performance, a country’s human development, income equality and the extent of its shadow economy. The authors also argue that a company that originally contributes to society will continue to do so because of the structural inertia faced by organisations. The hypotheses were validated with an empirical study conducted with a sample of 9,276 new-born European companies.

Findings

The most significant contributors to society are large, profitable companies, which are leveraged but solvent, with high asset turnover and high-profit margins and which are productive and pay high wages. Unfortunately, this win-win situation describes a small percentage of the explained variance, which can explain why social and financial performance sometimes do not go hand-in-hand. The paper identifies features of other types of companies that contribute to society, suggesting criteria for socially responsible investors. Country development favours the cumulative contribution that firms make to society.

Research limitations/implications

Most accounting systems do not collect all the information necessary to calculate a refined version of the indicator such as percentage of purchases from local suppliers, percentage of salaries for executives and disabled employees and percentage of financing from socially responsible financial entities. The authors encourage modification of the accounting systems to include those aspects.

Practical implications

This paper identifies several types of companies that contribute the most to society from a modest set of financial indicators. Socially responsible investors can estimate their contribution to society, devising new investment criteria.

Social implications

The paper identifies several types of companies that contribute the most to society from a modest set of financial indicators. Socially responsible investors can estimate their contribution to society, devising new investment criteria.

Originality/value

The paper makes two contributions, one methodological and the other empirical. By applying a financial methodology, the authors propose to capitalise the contributions of a company over a period of time. The empirical study identifies both firm and country characteristics that explain CCS.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 18 November 2013

Abstract

Details

Intellectual Capital and Public Sector Performance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-169-4

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2016

Farzin Abadi, A.N. Bany-Ariffin, Ryszard Kokoszczynski and W.N.W. Azman-Saini

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of banking concentration on firm leverage in 21 major emerging countries from different geographical regions…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of banking concentration on firm leverage in 21 major emerging countries from different geographical regions, controlling for firm determinant and macroeconomic determinant of firm leverage.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on a relatively large sample of 5,779 enterprises with total 48,280 numbers of observations over the period from 2006 to 2013 and the regression model is performed by applying two-step system general method of moment estimator methodology.

Findings

This study finds a positive and significant relationship between banking concentration and firm leverage. Therefore, the overall results follow the information-based theory which indicates lower firms financing obstacles as banks are more concentrated.

Research limitations/implications

Bank-level data of all the countries to measure banking concentration is until 2013, which restrict the empirical analysis until 2013. Also, the study conducts the analysis.

Practical implications

The study enables policymakers, society, and academics to have better understanding on the beneficial effects of alternative banking market structure on firms’ access to credit and therefore, in determining the level of firm leverage in emerging countries.

Originality/value

The study represents one of the limited available empirical researches to examine the beneficial effect of alternative banking market structures of firm leverage in emerging countries.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Alejandro Rodriguez and Yolanda Rodriguez

The purpose of this paper is to evidence the scenarios any leader is currently facing in front of three specific situations: a volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evidence the scenarios any leader is currently facing in front of three specific situations: a volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous world (VUCA); a generation that is changing the way to form relationships, work and knowledge transfer;and the possibility for a “Cloud Leadership” to overcome today’s reality of constant change, redirection, new frontiers and formatting.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper seeks one theoretical entailment, so that the world today presented by Johansen (2012) from four perspectives needs to be considered from the perspective of leadership.

Findings

The paper views leadership as “a Cloud.” It brings new insights to a social and organizational analysis of leaders today. The metaphorical language is creative in the formative accompaniment of the Millennials, it provides and clarifies the orientation in all areas where they interact.

Research limitations/implications

Leaders leading Millennials face challenges with specific textures: convergence of traits, processes and outcomes with a leadership enriched by schools and theories immersed in a VUCA world where resiliency is a scarce commodity. Raising, building, taking advantage of the dynamism that each individual possesses, educating from the positive and toward the positive, is a benefit of a “Cloud Leader” in a VUCA world where Millennials have a strong presence.

Practical implications

This paper offers a kind of vignette of leadership to illustrate the theories, skills, abilities and different approaches converging within leaders for these coming years: the immersion in a VUCA world, leading a workforce with more Millennial copartners present each day and the metaphors that can help us better understand them, and being a “Cloud Leader.”

Social implications

Leadership is going to be a matter of discovering the positive energy in each person, to stimulate the best in every individual and develop the potential of everybody because this “energy” is a small assurance of the future. A leader who attempts to “bring out” the positive in each person, in every context in which he or she is immersed, a leader who seeks the best interventions possible according to his or her capabilities and resources, this is a leader we can call “a leader for the coming future: a Cloud Leader.”

Originality/value

In this paper the author uses metaphors as an interesting method to say something with multimodal meanings under the “umbrella concepts” of Millennial generation, and leadership style. It is argued that scientific reasoning does not solely exist in the individual’s head, but emerges in conjunction with the expressed representations.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 34 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Shi Shen, Nikita Murzintcev, Changqing Song and Changxiu Cheng

The purpose of this study is to propose a method to retrieve data on an event based on a preliminary collection of event-specific hashtags.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to propose a method to retrieve data on an event based on a preliminary collection of event-specific hashtags.

Design/methodology/approach

Extra knowledge, or a list of events with recorded features that can be used to characterize an event and separate it from other simultaneously occurring social phenomena, is employed. The first step involves the estimation and use of the impact area to retrieve messages from Twitter. This is followed by an extraction of hashtags from these messages. After that, the noisy hashtags would be filtered out by some heuristic rules. Finally, hashtags are used to collect relevant messages from not only Twitter but also other social media platforms.

Findings

The proposed method has high selectivity and is able to collect distinct sets of hashtags even for similar simultaneous events. In addition, spatial and temporal features are sufficient to improve collecting information of disaster events.

Originality/value

This work discusses a method of information retrieval of an event from cross-platform social media. The proposed method can be applied to other studies of geographically related events.

Details

Information Discovery and Delivery, vol. 45 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6247

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2007

Carlos Serrano‐Cinca, Yolanda Fuertes‐Callén and Begoña Gutiérrez‐Nieto

A structural equation model is proposed to explain internet reporting by banks. The model relates three constructs of financial institutions (size, financial performance…

Abstract

Purpose

A structural equation model is proposed to explain internet reporting by banks. The model relates three constructs of financial institutions (size, financial performance, and internet visibility) to their final influence on internet information disclosure (e‐transparency).

Design/methodology/approach

This paper's proposed model analyses a sample of Spanish financial institutions using publicly available data. The model is tested using partial least squares.

Findings

A positive and statistically significant relationship has been found between size, financial performance, internet visibility, and e‐transparency, with direct and indirect effects. The study shows that size accounts for most of the variance. Size has a positive effect on e‐transparency, financial performance, and internet visibility. However, the direct effect of financial performance and internet visibility on e‐transparency is small.

Research limitations/implications

The researchers have analysed only one year of data from one country and one sector. The direction of cause and effect assumed in the model is a logical one, but statistical methods cannot prove causality, only association. Even though any bank can disclose its financial information online for a very low cost, building a robust, interactive web site requires major resources. This gives larger banks a value added advantage.

Originality/value

The paper examines the relationship between size, financial performance, internet visibility and e‐transparency using a structural model. Although structural models are commonly used in many scientific disciplines, they have not yet been applied in disclosure research.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

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