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Article
Publication date: 25 December 2020

Laura Lucia-Palacios, Raúl Pérez-López and Yolanda Polo-Redondo

The aim of this paper is to examine the effects of the disconfirmation of expectations of crowding and mall accessibility, on stress and two marketing outcomes…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to examine the effects of the disconfirmation of expectations of crowding and mall accessibility, on stress and two marketing outcomes, satisfaction and promoter scoring.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were obtained through two face-to-face surveys from mall shoppers that answered them at two different moments of their shopping experience, before entering the mall and before leaving it. Results are obtained from 230 customers that answered the two questionnaires.

Findings

The findings suggest that stress indirectly influences customer promoter scoring through satisfaction, while disconfirmation of expectations influences it directly and indirectly.

Practical implications

These results also suggest that stress and disconfirmation of expectations about crowding and accessibility are important in determining promoter scoring. To reduce stress and increase satisfaction and promoter scoring, managers should focus on exceeding customers' expectations about mall accessibility and on ensuring that customers experience a lower level of crowding than they expected.

Originality/value

The article examines Net Promoter Scoring, an outcome that has attracted managers' attention but little is known about its antecedents. The paper provides evidence of the effect of disconfirmation of expectations and negative emotions on promoter scoring.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 49 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 17 January 2020

Laura Lucia-Palacios, Raúl Pérez-López and Yolanda Polo-Redondo

This paper aims to demonstrate that stress is a relevant feeling to take into account in mall experience and customer satisfaction management. Furthermore, it is proposed…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to demonstrate that stress is a relevant feeling to take into account in mall experience and customer satisfaction management. Furthermore, it is proposed that its effects on mall experience and satisfaction differ depending on shopping motivation and frequency.

Design/methodology/approach

The method is based on seemingly unrelated regressions models and data were obtained through a survey of 1,088 mall clients. Mall experience is addressed through customer cognitive and affective responses. Both terms together with stress and customer satisfaction with the mall are constructs measured by seven-point Likert scales. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were conducted to validate these measures.

Findings

The results show that stress reduces customers’ affective response and satisfaction. The effect of low levels of stress on customer affective response is less negative for frequent shoppers, and the influence of high levels on satisfaction is less negative for them. Furthermore, stress has a U-shaped effect on customers’ cognitive response, an effect that is reduced for frequent shoppers.

Practical implications

Mall managers should try to reduce stress in the management of their customers’ experience. Moreover, they should increase the shopping frequency of their clients by implementing marketing strategies, such as frequency programs and serial concerts, and assist shoppers in reorganizing their shopping goals by implementing organizing tools and new recommendations and suggestions.

Originality/value

Given that previous work on shopping stress is scarce, this paper expands the extant literature by analyzing its effects on mall experience and customer satisfaction. Furthermore, it shows that these effects may vary depending on shopping frequency and motivation.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Jorge Matute, Yolanda Polo-Redondo and Ana Utrillas

With the expansion of internet as a tool for exchanging information, companies include in their websites a virtual space to share information among users. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

With the expansion of internet as a tool for exchanging information, companies include in their websites a virtual space to share information among users. The purpose of this paper is to explore the characteristics of consumers’ reviews (electronic word-of-mouth quantity, credibility and quality) as antecedents of customers’ online repurchase intentions. Specially, it proposes a model where trust on an online seller and perceived usefulness of a website mediate the influence of electronic word-of-mouth (EWOM) characteristics on repurchase intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equation modeling was employed on a sample of 252 online customers. An online questionnaire was aimed at internet users who had previously made an online purchase and read online reviews received from the vendor’s website.

Findings

Results show that only EWOM quality has a positive direct effect on consumers’ repurchase intention while quantity has a negative influence. Perceived usefulness mediates the influence of all EWOM characteristics on online repurchase intention. EWOM credibility and quality also indirectly influence repurchase intentions through trust on the online vendor.

Practical implications

This paper outlines ways to improve managerial implications by developing mobile applications or websites where the reviews have an appropriate volume and quality of information. Moreover, it suggests general advice to present online reviews in a useful manner to users who visit these websites.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to propose an integrative model that studies in depth the three main EWOM characteristics and customer responses for understanding their repurchase behavior.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 40 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Laura Lucia-Palacios, Victoria Bordonaba-Juste, Yolanda Polo-Redondo and Marko Grünhagen

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of e-business implementation (in terms of internal integration and external diffusion) on organizational performance…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of e-business implementation (in terms of internal integration and external diffusion) on organizational performance through the mediating effects of differentiation, enterprise agility, customer relationship development and partner attraction.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of franchisors was conducted across the USA and Spain. Before running the model, the paper tests for measurement invariance across the two country samples. The paper uses structural equation modeling to test the conceptual model.

Findings

The results of the measurement invariance suggest that all the constructs supported this characteristic, except for internal integration. External diffusion leads to differentiation, enterprise agility, relationship development and partner attraction for American and Spanish firms. However, internal integration has no impact on any outcome in the USA while, for Spanish firms, it has a positive and direct effect on economic performance. The full mediating role of non-financial performance between external diffusion and organizational performance depends on the country analyzed. While differentiation and relationship development fully mediate this relationship in the US sample, in the Spanish sample, the advantages of external diffusion are transferred through differentiation, enterprise agility and partner attraction.

Practical implications

–The paper suggests that franchise firms should not focus on the direct effect of e-business implementation on performance. Instead, franchisors should consider that its effect on performance is achieved through greater differentiation, relationship development, enterprise agility and partner attraction. So, the paper suggests that franchisors should think about the long-term effects of the advantages obtained from implementing e-business.

Originality/value

This study contributes to IS research by identifying the link between internal integration and external diffusion and organizational performance through the examination of the mediating role of non-financial performance measures in two countries. Compared with previous research, the paper first analyzes measurement invariance across countries to provide unbiased results.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2011

Jesús J. Cambra‐Fierro and Yolanda Polo‐Redondo

This article seeks to analyze the concept of the long‐term orientation of relationships in the supply chain (SC). This research aims to study interactions between…

Abstract

Purpose

This article seeks to analyze the concept of the long‐term orientation of relationships in the supply chain (SC). This research aims to study interactions between satisfaction and commitment with the relational perspective of firm‐supplier relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

The establishment of a “post‐satisfaction” framework is necessary. A model based on structural equations is used to test the set of hypotheses.

Findings

The findings show that cooperation, communication, satisfaction, proved trust and commitment explain the long‐term orientation of the relationships in the SC.

Research limitations/implications

This research only considers the buyer's perspective. The article considers some implications relating to different profiles of trust.

Practical implications

The article includes several implications about how to communicate with customers and suppliers, how to cooperate with customers and suppliers, why buyers trust suppliers, how buyers perceive satisfaction, and how buyers commit to suppliers.

Originality/value

This research, based on its “post‐satisfaction” approach, aims to complete the framework proposed by Cambra and Polo. Ideas related to the evolution of trust (“previous” vs “proved” trust) are discussed.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2011

Victoria Bordonaba‐Juste, Laura Lucia‐Palacios and Yolanda Polo‐Redondo

Research on franchise system survival has focused on analyzing organizational failure. However, there are two types of market exit: organizational failure and franchise…

Abstract

Purpose

Research on franchise system survival has focused on analyzing organizational failure. However, there are two types of market exit: organizational failure and franchise discontinuance, but little research has distinguished between the two. The purpose of this study is to examine whether different factors explain these types of exit. Apart from the common factors included in previous research (age, size, upfront fee, royalty rate and ownership structure), this paper aims to add system growth and its interaction with age and size.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses data about franchise systems in Spain from 1986 to 2004 from the catering and fashion sectors and applies the Cox survival model to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The paper finds that system growth rates and system size only influence franchise discontinuance. Both the youngest and the oldest firms show the lowest risk of discontinuing franchising. The results are similar to those found in previous research that uses the two types of market exit as synonymous.

Research limitations/implications

The article findings suggest that it is important to define franchise survival.

Practical implications

This research identifies what franchisors can do to continue in the market. An important result is that young and small franchisors should grow at a moderate rate. They should learn first how to manage a few units before becoming a large network.

Originality/value

This research examines the differences between two types of market exit (organizational failure and franchise discontinuance) and their drivers from the franchisor's perspective. This research contributes to the franchising literature by analyzing the effect of growth on survival. Additionally, the moderating effect of size and age on growth on the two types of market exits is included.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Ana Garrido‐Rubio and Yolanda Polo‐Redondo

Innovation launch strategies are usually critical for innovation success. The main objective of this work consists of analysing the influence of the tactical launch…

Abstract

Purpose

Innovation launch strategies are usually critical for innovation success. The main objective of this work consists of analysing the influence of the tactical launch decisions on new product performance

Design/methodology/approach

Starts with a brief literature review. Then the results obtained in our study are compared with those obtained in other research. The data used in our research describes a new product launch in the Spanish agro‐food sector. The method for collecting the information was through a mailed questionnaire. Because most of response variables were categorical, and in order to verify the proposed hypotheses, cross tabulation was used. We used Pearson's chi‐squared (χ2), likelihood ratio (H2) and the adjusted residuals too.

Findings

The results propose a series of recommendations for the executives in charge of marketing new products. Specifically, suggests that it will be more likely to achieve success if, when launching a new product, skimming strategies are used, if intensive distribution is used for selling an innovation and the investment in the communication media is greater than that made by competitors. However, it is more possible to fail if the new product is marketed using an individual brand, penetration prices, push communication strategies and less expenditure on this concept than the competitors.

Research limitations/implications

The literature review suggests that some of these tactical decisions seem to be related with other launch decisions (strategic launch decisions). As a result of this, it will be interesting to perform these similar analyses for those as well as to analyse the possible links that may exist between both and their influence on the results. Future research could explore these relationships in other industrial sector or countries. Perhaps, it would be possible provide a common perspective.

Originality/value

In spite of the importance of the last phase of new product, there are few empirical works about it. This work tries to explain the transcendence of the tactical launch decisions and the influence of it on the success/failure of an innovation

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2008

Jesús J. Cambra‐Fierro and Yolanda Polo‐Redondo

The purpose of this research paper is to analyze the concept of satisfaction in firm‐supplier relationships.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research paper is to analyze the concept of satisfaction in firm‐supplier relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative approach is considered in the study. The paper offers a set of scales to analyze the main antecedents of the relationship quality concept. Causal relations are also analyzed by testing a model based on structural equations.

Findings

Cooperation, communication, trust and adaptation to expectations explain satisfaction. Proposals for further research related to commitment and long‐term orientation of supply relationships are also included.

Research limitations/implications

This paper takes the Spanish context as reference. Generalization of the conclusions should begin with a previous analysis to consider the similarities and differences between contexts. The data of the research are based on the buyer's perspective.

Practical implications

Suppliers are able to identify elements affecting satisfaction. In order to establish lasting relationships, suppliers must identify the real needs of companies. They must also manage cooperation, communication and trust. The model and measurement scales could easily be adapted beyond the dyad and beyond the whole demand‐supply chain. The conclusions could be valuable to both buyers and sellers.

Originality/value

The paper highlights that some works published in Supply Chain Management: An International Journal indicate that the factors determining company‐supplier relationships have to be thoroughly studied and additional models explaining these relationships have to be tested.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Yolanda Polo Redondo and Jesús J. Cambra Fierro

Taking the Spanish agro‐food sector as reference, the current work seeks to examine the moderating effect of the type of input exchanged; specifically, to analyze the…

Abstract

Purpose

Taking the Spanish agro‐food sector as reference, the current work seeks to examine the moderating effect of the type of input exchanged; specifically, to analyze the potential differences in temporal orientation of the relationships established between companies and suppliers of “core” and “auxiliary” inputs.

Design/methodology/approach

The information was obtained by means of a postal survey of managers responsible for the supply function from a random sample of Spanish agro‐food companies, specifically wine producers. The reason for approaching these professionals was to obtain responses from individuals who are directly in contact with the firm's suppliers, and who negotiate the purchasing agreements.

Findings

The findings show that, although communication, trust and satisfaction are always important as evaluated elements, their importance is higher when “core” products are considered. The data also indicate that for the case of products that are considered “core”, the relation between commitment and the long‐term orientation of the relationship is not significant. In this way, the more relevant the input is, more important are communication, trust and satisfaction, and the less important is commitment.

Originality/value

Although many studies have analyzed the long‐term orientation of buyer‐seller relationships, very few have considered the influence of the type of product exchanged. And furthermore, no previous works have analyzed the moderating effect of product type on the factors determining this long‐term orientation.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 14 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2006

Juan Pablo Maicas Lopez, Yolanda Polo Redondo and Fco. Javier Sese Olivan

The purpose of this research is to show how relationship marketing has recognized the importance of building long‐term relationships in increasing firms' profitability and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to show how relationship marketing has recognized the importance of building long‐term relationships in increasing firms' profitability and guaranteeing their future viability. Owing to the damaging effects that customer switching behavior could have on the development of successful relationships, understanding customers' switching decisions can represent a key step in the process of establishing, developing and maintaining successful relational exchanges. The current study aims to contribute in this direction by introducing the heterogeneity of customers in their relationship characteristics (depth, length and breadth) into the analysis of customers' propensity to switch service providers.

Design/methodology/approach

The data set used to carry out this study has been obtained from a panel survey (Home Online) of technology users in the United Kingdom, and the proposed hypotheses are tested on the fixed‐line telephone sector using logistic regression. This technique associates the relationship characteristics with the probability that a switch in suppliers will take place.

Findings

The results obtained show that the length, depth and breadth of relationships help to determine customers' propensity to switch fixed‐telephone suppliers. Customers who maintain a long‐lasting relationship with the firm (length), use the service more (depth), and invest in complementary services (breadth) will be less predisposed to switch.

Practical implications

With regard to recommendations for practitioners, the paper highlights the need for firms to renew both acquisition and retention strategies in order to take individual customer information into account. This should help them to identify and retain the most valuable customers and to optimally allocate marketing resources (from switching‐prone to non‐switching‐prone customers).

Originality/value

The main contribution of the paper is to consider relationship characteristics in the analysis of customer switching behavior. This research shows that the heterogeneity observed in the depth, length and breadth of customer‐firm relationships explains the differences in the propensity to switch service providers.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

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