Search results

1 – 10 of 20
Article
Publication date: 2 August 2019

Le Wang, Zao Sun, Xiaoyong Dai, Yixin Zhang and Hai-hua Hu

The purpose of this paper is to facilitate understanding of how to mitigate the privacy concerns of users who have experienced privacy invasions.

1497

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to facilitate understanding of how to mitigate the privacy concerns of users who have experienced privacy invasions.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the communication privacy management theory, the authors developed a model suggesting that privacy concerns form through a cognitive process involving threat-coping appraisals, institutional privacy assurances and privacy experiences. The model was tested using data from an empirical survey with 913 randomly selected social media users.

Findings

Privacy concerns are jointly determined by perceived privacy risks and privacy self-efficacy. The perceived effectiveness of institutional privacy assurances in terms of established privacy policies and privacy protection technology influences the perceptions of privacy risks and privacy self-efficacy. More specifically, privacy invasion experiences are negatively associated with the perceived effectiveness of institutional privacy assurances.

Research limitations/implications

Privacy concerns are conceptualized as general concerns that reflect an individual’s worry about the possible loss of private information. The specific types of private information were not differentiated.

Originality/value

This paper is among the first to clarify the specific mechanisms through which privacy invasion experiences influence privacy concerns. Privacy concerns have long been viewed as resulting from individual actions. The study contributes to literature by linking privacy concerns with institutional privacy practice.

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 17 November 2021

Kunio Shirahada and Yixin Zhang

This study aims to identify the counterproductive knowledge behavior (CKB) of volunteers in nonprofit organizations and its influencing factors, based on the theories of planned…

4317

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify the counterproductive knowledge behavior (CKB) of volunteers in nonprofit organizations and its influencing factors, based on the theories of planned behavior and well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was used to collect 496 valid responses. A structural equation model was constructed, and the relationships among the constructs were estimated via the maximum likelihood method. To analyze the direct and indirect effects, 2,000 bootstrapping runs were conducted. A Kruskal-Wallis test was also conducted to analyze the relationship between the variables.

Findings

A combination of organizational factors and individual attitudes and perceptions can be used to explain CKB. Insecurity about knowledge sharing had the greatest impact on CKB. A competitive organizational norm induced CKB while a knowledge-sharing organizational norm did not have a significant impact. Further, the more self-determined the volunteer activity was, the more the CKB was suppressed. However, well-being did not have a significant direct effect. Volunteers with high levels of well-being and self-determination had significantly lower levels of insecurity about knowledge sharing compared to those who did not.

Practical implications

Well-being arising from volunteering did not directly suppress CKB. To improve organizational efficiency by reducing CKB, nonprofit organization managers should provide intrinsically motivating tasks and interact with the volunteers.

Originality/value

There is a lack of empirical research on CKB in volunteer organizations; therefore, the authors propose a new approach to knowledge management in volunteer activities.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 26 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 May 2020

Olli Säynätmäki and Yixin Zhang

This study aims to understand elderly people and their family members’ perceptions and usage of a mobile personal safety service.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to understand elderly people and their family members’ perceptions and usage of a mobile personal safety service.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts both interviews and analysis of actual usage data to cross-validate the findings. Four family groups and 11 subjects participated in the study.

Findings

Elderly people are willing to learn to use the mobile safety service, and some elderly people explore more features than their younger family members. Family support facilitates their learning. Elderly people feel psychologically secure when using the mobile safety service. Privacy concerns are mitigated because they consider location sharing is necessary for the service.

Research limitations/implications

The current sample is small, as it involves collection of both interview data and actual usage data. Considering the emergency of the mobile personal safety service, the study is exploratory.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that elderly people are willing to learn and use technology such as the mobile safety service, which is relevant to their daily lives. Designers may think about how to highlight the relevancy aspect of technologies in elderly peoples’ lives.

Originality/value

This study is one of the earliest studies about elderly people’s usage of mobile safety service. This study reveals that elderly people are willing to learn to use the mobile safety service and explore its features. Technical support from family members and relevancy of the service in their daily lives may encourage them to use the technology.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 26 July 2021

Yixin Zhang, Lizhen Cui, Wei He, Xudong Lu and Shipeng Wang

The behavioral decision-making of digital-self is one of the important research contents of the network of crowd intelligence. The factors and mechanisms that affect…

Abstract

Purpose

The behavioral decision-making of digital-self is one of the important research contents of the network of crowd intelligence. The factors and mechanisms that affect decision-making have attracted the attention of many researchers. Among the factors that influence decision-making, the mind of digital-self plays an important role. Exploring the influence mechanism of digital-selfs’ mind on decision-making is helpful to understand the behaviors of the crowd intelligence network and improve the transaction efficiency in the network of CrowdIntell.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, the authors use behavioral pattern perception layer, multi-aspect perception layer and memory network enhancement layer to adaptively explore the mind of a digital-self and generate the mental representation of a digital-self from three aspects including external behavior, multi-aspect factors of the mind and memory units. The authors use the mental representations to assist behavioral decision-making.

Findings

The evaluation in real-world open data sets shows that the proposed method can model the mind and verify the influence of the mind on the behavioral decisions, and its performance is better than the universal baseline methods for modeling user interest.

Originality/value

In general, the authors use the behaviors of the digital-self to mine and explore its mind, which is used to assist the digital-self to make decisions and promote the transaction in the network of CrowdIntell. This work is one of the early attempts, which uses neural networks to model the mental representation of digital-self.

Details

International Journal of Crowd Science, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-7294

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 June 2023

Jiaxin Duan, Yixin (Lucy) Wei and Lei Lu

This study aims to examine the behaviour of institutional and retail investors in response to news about industry leaders (peer firms) and to determine its impact on the stock…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the behaviour of institutional and retail investors in response to news about industry leaders (peer firms) and to determine its impact on the stock prices of other firms (focal firms) within the same industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The study investigates the impact of peer news on investor behaviour of Chinese A-shares listed on the Shanghai and Shenzhen Stock Exchanges from 2010 to 2019. The media coverage of industry leaders is sourced from prominent Chinese online financial outlets and the Chinese Financial Press. Support vector machine is applied to identify the positive, neutral and negative news within the articles. The study uses event study and logistic regression to examine the effects of peer news on focal firms’ investor behaviour.

Findings

The results show that both good and bad news about leaders cause peers’ stock prices to increase initially, but then reverse within one quarter. Further analysis reveals that when leaders’ shares receive positive news coverage, institutional investors tend to exert excessive abnormal buying pressure on peers’ shares, resulting in overreactions. Conversely, retail investors do not actively trade on peers on leaders’ news day due to limited attention. In addition, the study shows that short-selling constraint inhibits bad news from reflecting in the stock prices.

Originality/value

The study highlights differences in investor behaviour. The finding that institutional investors tend to overreact more to peer firms’ news when focal firms are smaller and have a lower frequency of information disclosure supports the salient theory. This is consistent with the previous framework that suggests overreaction is more pronounced when it is difficult to combine external sources of information to evaluate the focal firms. In contrast, retail investors do not engage in active trading on peers on leaders’ news day due to the limited attention theory.

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

Jun Zhang and Yixin Chen

Introduces a method of food sensory evaluation employing artificial neural networks. The process of food sensory evaluation can be viewed as a multi‐input and multi‐output (MIMO…

1571

Abstract

Introduces a method of food sensory evaluation employing artificial neural networks. The process of food sensory evaluation can be viewed as a multi‐input and multi‐output (MIMO) system in which food composition serves as the input and human food evaluation as the output. It has proved to be very difficult to establish a mathematical model of this system; however, a series of samples have been obtained through experiments, each of which comprises input and output data. On the basis of these sample data, applies the back‐propagation algorithm (BP algorithm) to “train” a three‐layer feed‐forward network. The result is a neural network that can successfully imitate the food sensory evaluation of the evaluation panel. This method can also be applied in other fields such as food composition optimizing, new product development and market evaluation and investigation.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 April 2024

Yixin Zhao, Zhonghai Cheng and Yongle Chai

Natural disasters profoundly influence agricultural trade sustainability. This study investigates the effects of natural disasters on agricultural production imports in China…

Abstract

Purpose

Natural disasters profoundly influence agricultural trade sustainability. This study investigates the effects of natural disasters on agricultural production imports in China within 2002 and 2018. This exploration estimates the mediating role of transportation infrastructure and agriculture value-added and the moderating role of government effectiveness and diplomatic relations.

Design/methodology/approach

This investigation uses Probit, Logit, Cloglog and Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) models.

Findings

The results confirm the mediating role of transportation infrastructure and agriculture value-added and the moderating role of government effectiveness and diplomatic relations in China. According to the findings, natural disasters in trading partners heighten the risk to the agricultural imports. This risk raises, if disasters damage overall agricultural yield or transportation infrastructure. Moreover, governments’ effective response or diplomatic ties with China mitigate the risk. Finally, the effect of disasters varies by the developmental status of the country involved, with events in developed nations posing a greater risk to China’s imports than those in developing nations.

Originality/value

China should devise an early warning system to protect its agricultural imports by using advanced technologies such as data analytics, remote sensing and artificial intelligence. In addition, it can leverage this system by improving its collaboration with trading partners, involvement in international forums and agreement for mutual support in crisis.

Details

China Agricultural Economic Review, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-137X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 July 2022

Lei Hou, Lu Guan, Yixin Zhou, Anqi Shen, Wei Wang, Ang Luo, Heng Lu and Jonathan J.H. Zhu

User-generated content (UGC) refers to semantic and behavioral traces created by users on various social media platforms. While several waves of platforms have come and gone, the…

Abstract

Purpose

User-generated content (UGC) refers to semantic and behavioral traces created by users on various social media platforms. While several waves of platforms have come and gone, the long-term sustainability of UGC activities has become a critical question that bears significance for theoretical understanding and social media practices.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a large and lengthy dataset of both blogging and microblogging activities of the same set of users, a multistate survival analysis was applied to explore the patterns of users' staying, switching and multiplatforming behaviors, as well as the underlying driving factors.

Findings

UGC activities are generally unsustainable in the long run, and natural attrition is the primary reason, rather than competitive switching to new platforms. The availability of leisure time, expected gratification and previous experiences drive users' sustainability.

Originality/value

The authors adopted actual behavioral data from two generations of platforms instead of survey data on users' switching intentions. Four types of users are defined: loyal, switcher, multiplatformer and dropout. As measured by the transitions among the four states, the different sustainability behaviors are thereby studied via an integrated framework. These two originalities bridge gaps in the literature and offer new insights into exploring user sustainability in social media.

Article
Publication date: 16 August 2019

Li Cheng and Zuchen Liu

The transition from high school to university poses many challenges for university students including dietary behaviors’ change and subsequent obesity risk. More tailored…

Abstract

Purpose

The transition from high school to university poses many challenges for university students including dietary behaviors’ change and subsequent obesity risk. More tailored interventions and promotions to establish a healthier eating habit are needed to reduce obesity risks. The purpose of this paper is to investigate food intake differences on obesity risk among university students in China through exploring the differences of food intakes with gender, the year in college and body mass index (BMI).

Design/methodology/approach

Cross-sectional study was carried in five universities which were randomly selected in all the universities located in different geographical areas of Beijing, China. The sample consisted of 631 university students whom aged from 18 to 25 years. t-tests and one-way ANOVA tests were used to find differences of food intakes with gender, the year in college and BMI.

Findings

Having more consumption of food with high protein, high fat and high sugar, but less consumption of fruits and vegetables, may give university students a greater chance to be obese, and food intakes were significantly varied in different genders among Chinese university students.

Originality/value

There is a lack of evidence for investigating the differences of food intakes with gender on obesity among young adults in China. Findings of this study indicated that the food intakes of male students might make them more prone to obesity than female students, and suggested more tailored interventions, food marketing strategies and promotions on controlling students’ food intakes for a healthier life are needed.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 March 2023

Chang Su, Mingjian Zhou and Yixin Yang

Drawing on social capital theory, this study investigated the effects of structural, cognitive and relational family social capital on employees' career advancement through the…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on social capital theory, this study investigated the effects of structural, cognitive and relational family social capital on employees' career advancement through the mechanism of family-to-work enrichment (FWE), taking perceived organizational politics (POP) as a moderator.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from 252 full-time employees working in public institutions and government departments in China, a collectivist cultural context. Hierarchical regression and path analysis were conducted to test the hypotheses.

Findings

FWE significantly mediated the positive relationships between the three subtypes of family social capital and career advancement. The effects of structural and cognitive family social capital, but not relational family social capital (RFSC), on FWE were stronger when POP was low (vs high).

Research limitations/implications

FWE is arguably a promising mechanism for explaining the links between family social capital and career outcomes. However, due to the cross-sectional nature of the data, conclusions regarding causality remain limited.

Practical implications

Family social capital may enrich the careers of employees in collectivist cultures. Managers should mitigate their organization's political climate to promote employees' career advancement.

Originality/value

This study contributes to career research by linking family social capital to career outcomes through the lens of FWE for the first time and by identifying organizational politics as an important moderator that can influence the dynamics of resource enrichment in a collectivist culture.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 53 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

1 – 10 of 20