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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2017

Yi-Fen Liu, Yingzi Xu and I-Ling Ling

This research aims to investigate how backstage visibility affects intangibility and perceived risk at the pre-purchase stage and how service credence moderates the effect…

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to investigate how backstage visibility affects intangibility and perceived risk at the pre-purchase stage and how service credence moderates the effect of backstage visibility on intangibility and perceived risk. It also focuses on the effect of backstage visibility on perceived service quality and value at the post-purchase stage and the moderating role of the service contact level.

Design/methodology/approach

This research tests the causal relationships between backstage visibility and customers’ service evaluations through two experimental studies.

Findings

Study 1 shows that customers who are exposed to backstage cues perceive less pre-purchase risk in the service than those who are not exposed. Pictures plus text information are more effective than text illustrations alone for risk reduction. This risk reduction effect is stronger for high-credence than for low-credence services and is partially mediated by the perceived intangibility of the service. Study 2 reveals that customers with access to backstage cues perceive higher service quality and higher overall value from service experiences. The value increase is more significant for high-contact than for low-contact services.

Research limitations/implications

Future research could apply different methods to different data sources to provide further insight about backstage visibility.

Originality/value

The findings of this research suggest that allowing customers to view some backstage activities before purchase helps tangibilize the service, achieve more effective communication with customers and create more positive service experiences.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 November 2021

Yi-Fen Liu and I-Ling Ling

Weight loss services feature high consumer involvement that is sometimes marked by repetitive failures. These features can affect regret and its associated factors…

Abstract

Purpose

Weight loss services feature high consumer involvement that is sometimes marked by repetitive failures. These features can affect regret and its associated factors differently from the way that discrete failure can. The purpose of this study is to investigate consumer regret over repetitive failures in weight loss services as well as its antecedents (overeating and insufficient exercise), consequences (rumination and reflection) and moderators (failure experiences and required effort). This study also investigates how rumination and reflection affect persistence intention.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 318 samples were collected through three surveys, one of which contained a scenario, provided to consumers who experienced repetitive failures in weight loss. The proposed relationships were tested using structural equation modeling, dominance analysis and PROCESS modeling.

Findings

The results of this study reveal that overeating contributes to regret more saliently than does insufficient exercise. The effect of regret on rumination (thoughts about continuing to blame oneself and giving up the pursuit of goals) is stronger than on reflection (thoughts about learning from prior failures and willingness to try again), and greater reflection results in higher persistence intention. Moreover, the effect of insufficient exercise on regret and the effect of regret on rumination are augmented with cumulative failure experiences, whereas required effort enhances the impact of regret on reflection.

Originality/value

This study is the first to focus on regret over repetitive failures in weight loss. It advances the literature by clarifying the antecedents and consequences of regret, showing how failure experiences influence the relationships between regret and its associated factors as well as identifying interventions that benefit from regret.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 February 2020

I-Ling Ling, Yi-Fen Liu, Chien-Wei (Wilson) Lin and Chih-Hui Shieh

This study aims to understand the underlying mechanism and boundary conditions of the IKEA effect in self-expressive mass customization (MC). It examines the effect of the…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to understand the underlying mechanism and boundary conditions of the IKEA effect in self-expressive mass customization (MC). It examines the effect of the extent of choice in MC toolkits in terms of perceived value of self-designed products, as well as how self-expression mediates this effect and what kind of consumers are more inclined to experience such effect.

Design/methodology/approach

Two experiments were conducted, using online MC toolkits. In total, 393 consumers participated in the experiments. Data collected were analyzed using t-tests, analyses of variance, path analyses, bootstrap analyses and spotlight tests.

Findings

The results show that offering a greater extent of choice in MC toolkits to consumers provides a greater opportunity for self-expression, resulting in higher product valuation. Further, consumers who have high romanticism in aesthetic preference and high self-esteem are more inclined to influences associated with this effect.

Originality/value

This research adds to the literature on the IKEA effect in self-expressive MC by identifying a key antecedent (extent of choice), its underlying mechanism (self-expression), and two boundary conditions (aesthetic preference and self-esteem). The results of this study provide firms with a better understanding of how they can improve their self-expressive MC strategies.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 October 2019

Yi-Fen Liu, Jun-Fang Liao and Jacob Jou

The purpose of this paper is to explore healthcare waiting time and the negative and positive effects (i.e. the dual effects) it has on outpatient satisfaction.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore healthcare waiting time and the negative and positive effects (i.e. the dual effects) it has on outpatient satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Self-administered surveys with 334 outpatients and follow-up interviews with 20 outpatients in three large hospitals in Taiwan were conducted to collect data.

Findings

Quantitative surveys demonstrated that perceived waiting time correlated with satisfaction negatively first but then positively. Satisfaction also correlated with doctor reputation and patient sociability. Follow-up qualitative interviews further revealed that, for some patients, waiting contributed positively to patient evaluations through signaling better healthcare quality and facilitating social interaction.

Originality/value

This research demonstrated the possibility that waiting might have positive effects on healthcare satisfaction. It also identified variables that could produce greater positive perceptions during hospital waiting and underlying mechanisms that could explain how the positive effects work. This research may potentially help hospitals with a better understanding of how they can improve patients’ waiting experiences and increase satisfaction.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 October 2018

Lin-Hua Lu and Yi-Fen Huang

This study aims to examine what types of interfirm linkages a firm enters in relation to its manufacturing strategy. The authors further aim to determine whether…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine what types of interfirm linkages a firm enters in relation to its manufacturing strategy. The authors further aim to determine whether heterogeneous resources have different moderating effects on the relationship between a firm’s manufacturing strategy and interfirm linkages.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample consists of survey and archival data on 80 publicly listed electronics firms from the semiconductor and optoelectronics industries in Taiwan. Because the dependent variable, interfirm linkage, is a binary term, the authors apply logistic regression in our study.

Findings

This paper provides empirical insight into how a firm’s manufacturing strategy affects its probability to engage in specific types of interfirm linkages. The authors find that when a firm pursues an efficiency (flexibility) strategy, it will tend to engage in marketing (technical) interfirm linkages. In addition, absorbed slack strengthens the fit between manufacturing strategy and interfirm linkage type more than unabsorbed slack does.

Research limitations/implications

Because the sample is drawn from the Taiwanese semiconductor and optoelectronic industries, the authors encourage scholars to examine the generalizability of the findings. Future studies can furthermore adopt in-depth interviews to facilitate a better understanding of decision-makers’ considerations when entering interfirm linkages.

Originality/value

This study extends resource dependence theory across a firm’s boundary and applies the resource-based view to resource heterogeneity. The findings advance the understanding of the relationships between strategic orientation, slack resources and interfirm linkage choices. The authors show that it is important that firms consider strategic fit when they create linkages outside their existing boundaries.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 November 2020

Rizqa Anita, Muhammad Rasyid Abdillah and Nor Balkish Zakaria

This study aims to extend the understanding of the role of authentic leadership in encouraging subordinates to become internal whistleblowers. The current study aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to extend the understanding of the role of authentic leadership in encouraging subordinates to become internal whistleblowers. The current study aims to seek whether authentic leadership can encourage internal whistleblowing (IW) through employee controlled motivation for IW and moral courage.

Design/methodology/approach

The samples of this study were 221 employees working at 26 government organizations in one of the provinces located on Sumatera Island, Indonesia. Based on the cross-sectional survey method, this study used partial least square-structural equation modeling analysis with SmartPLS 3 software to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The result revealed that employee controlled motivation for whistleblowing and moral courage significantly mediates the effect of authentic leadership toward IW. This result also indicates that the two mediating variables in this study fully mediate the effect of authentic leadership toward IW.

Practical implications

This study highlights the critical role played by leaders in encouraging subordinates to IW in the workplace. The role of an authentic leader will have positively affected enhancing IW by employees, which has significant implications for the organization that particularly in manage organization wrongdoing in terms of eliminating or preventing unethical practice.

Originality/value

Theoretically, the current study extends the understanding of the mechanism underlying the relationship between authentic leadership and IW. This study proposes employee controlled motivation for IW and moral courage as the new mediator variables to explain how and why authentic leadership may encourage IW. Empirically, the current study chooses the Indonesian Government as a context that rarely conducts in the prior study.

Details

International Journal of Ethics and Systems, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9369

Keywords

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