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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2020

Chin-Ching Yin, Hung-Chang Chiu and Yi-Ching Hsieh

Using classic literary theory pertaining to conflicts, this study aims to investigate the links of various types of conflicts and brand attitudes, in the context of brand…

Abstract

Purpose

Using classic literary theory pertaining to conflicts, this study aims to investigate the links of various types of conflicts and brand attitudes, in the context of brand stories for search and experience product types.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used a survey of university students to test this study’s hypotheses.

Findings

The results reveal significant main effects of four conflict reversal stories on brand attitudes. The influences of man-against-self, man-against-man and man-against-society conflicts on brand attitude are greater for experience than for search products. In contrast, the influence of man-against-nature conflict is higher for search than for experience products.

Research limitations/implications

To generalize the results, this study should be replicated using more heterogeneous populations, setting the study in other cultures, testing actual brands and using a wider range of products.

Practical implications

The findings provide insights for marketers seeking to use appropriate conflicts in their brand stories to enhance customers’ brand attitudes.

Originality/value

Extant research does not address the relationship between different types of conflicts and customer attitudes, and the current study bridges this research gap.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 37 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2021

Chin-Ching Yin, Yi-Ching Hsieh, Hung-Chang Chiu and Jhih-Ling Yu

The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, this study applies social presence theory to explore the influences of public self-awareness on consumers’ choice…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, this study applies social presence theory to explore the influences of public self-awareness on consumers’ choice inconsistency and post-choice satisfaction. Second, the authors investigate how time pressure moderates the effects of self-awareness on choice inconsistency and post-choice satisfaction so that online sellers can better align their marketing strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

This research consists of two studies. Study 1 conducted a 3 (self-awareness: public/private/control) × 2 (time pressure: high/none) experiment, and 311 online participants were recruited to explore the influence of public self-awareness and time pressure. Study 2 used a 3 (self-awareness: public/private/control) × 2 (time pressure: high/no) × 2 (self-consciousness: high/low) quasi-experiments, and the authors used 652 online participants to examine the effect of self-awareness, time pressure and public self-consciousness on choice inconsistency and post-choice satisfaction.

Findings

The results indicate that publicly self-aware consumers under high time pressure show greater inconsistency than those under no time pressure. Also, people with higher public self-consciousness exhibited higher choice inconsistency and post-choice satisfaction in public self-awareness situations than those in private self-awareness and control conditions.

Research limitations/implications

To generalize the results, this study should be replicated using more heterogeneous populations in diverse regions and cultures, as well as other product categories.

Practical implications

This study explores the implications of evoking self-awareness during online consumption and the online purchase process by observing the moderating effect of self-consciousness and time pressure. The findings provide insights to marketing practitioners who seek to increase their companies’ competitive advantage and profits through effective online manipulations of consumers’ self-awareness.

Originality/value

Extant research does not address how time pressure affects the relationships among public self-awareness, choice inconsistency and post-choice satisfaction. In addition, prior research only focused on public self-awareness in customer consumption. This study bridges these gaps and has implications for e-commerce, consumer behavior and relationship marketing research fields.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2017

Yun-Chia Tang, Yi-Ching Hsieh and Hung-Chang Chiu

The purpose of this study is to determine how and when choice variety influences consumers’ willingness to purchase, according to a personal emotion perspective. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to determine how and when choice variety influences consumers’ willingness to purchase, according to a personal emotion perspective. The choice paradox indicates that although having many choices can be beneficial, it can also cause customer decision paralysis and unhappiness. This article proposes that the desire and motivation to process information vary from person to person, and emotional factors are relevant.

Design/methodology/approach

With a 2 × 2 experimental design, this study examines the influence of the interaction of choice variety with need for cognition (NFC) on positive and negative emotions, and then tests the mediating effects on purchase intentions. The sample includes 214 college students, assigned randomly to self-assessment questionnaires.

Findings

Both high NFC respondents in the high variety condition and low NFC respondents in the low variety condition exhibit more positive emotions than low NFC respondents in the high variety condition but not more than high NFC respondents in the low variety condition. Positive (negative) emotions increase (decrease) consumers’ purchase intentions.

Research limitations/implications

The experiment was conducted in a virtual store, which may not match real-life store environments or reflect participants’ actual purchase behaviours, so additional research should consider the influence of involvement further.

Practical implications

The results offer suggestions for developing more effective communication with emotions, increasing involvement to maintain consumers’ positive emotions and relieve their confusion, and managing product variety.

Originality/value

This article meets the identified need to study how choice variety influences consumers’ willingness to purchase from a personal emotion perspective.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 51 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Abbas J. Ali, Monle Lee, Yi‐Ching Hsieh and Krish Krishnan

Individualism collectivism measures, along with decision styles, are examined in Taiwan. About 600 questionnaires were distributed directly to employees with managerial…

Abstract

Individualism collectivism measures, along with decision styles, are examined in Taiwan. About 600 questionnaires were distributed directly to employees with managerial positions in private, public, and mixed enter prises in the capital, Taipei. In general, Taiwanese were found to be more collectivist than individualistic. Participants displayed a strong preference for consultative and participative styles and determined that these two styles were the most effective in practice. Further more, participants indicated that their immediate supervisors were mostly consultative and autocratic.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2012

Yi‐Ching Hsieh, Jinshyang Roan, Anurag Pant, Jung‐Kuei Hsieh, Wen‐Ying Chen, Monle Lee and Hung‐Chang Chiu

The purpose of this paper is to explore how multichannel customers evaluate overall satisfaction across distribution channels and what the antecedents are of such satisfaction.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how multichannel customers evaluate overall satisfaction across distribution channels and what the antecedents are of such satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of bank customers in Taiwan was conducted. The total number of valid questionnaires was 479. Reliability and validity were tested. Maximum likelihood procedure of LISREL 8.8 was used to test the hypothesized structural equation model.

Findings

The findings indicate that the overall satisfaction in the multichannel environment is a critical determinant of customer retention and participation. The present study also develops the antecedents of multichannel satisfaction. In the multichannel environment, perceived multichannel service quality is positively related to satisfaction, while perceived channel switching difficulty is negatively related to satisfaction.

Originality/value

The present study employs the stimulus‐organism‐response (S‐O‐R) paradigm and the channel loyalty framework to better model customers' response to marketing activities in the multichannel distribution system.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Hung-Chang Chiu, Anurag Pant, Yi-Ching Hsieh, Monle Lee, Yi-Ting Hsioa and Jinshyang Roan

This paper aims to investigate the determinants of successful online viral marketing. More companies in recent years have reduced their advertising expenditures on…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the determinants of successful online viral marketing. More companies in recent years have reduced their advertising expenditures on traditional media. Instead, they focus more on word-of-mouth marketing to reach their potential customers.

Design/methodology/approach

A 2 (high/low utilitarian message context) × 2 (high/low hedonic message context) × 2 (message source: strong/weak tie strength) × 2 (channel: e-mail/blog) between-subjects experiment was conducted. A total of 363 completed questionnaires were collected in Taiwan.

Findings

The findings are fourfold. First, the greater the tie strength between the sender and the receiver, the more actively they share information. Second, an audience is more willing to share a message with others when the message contains higher degrees of utilitarian or hedonic values. Third, those who are highly involved with the products are more willing to share information than those who are less involved. Fourth, those who access the information via blogs are more willing to share information with others.

Research limitations/implications

The first limitation pertains to the issue of external validity. Also, to maximize internal validity, hypothetical scenarios and experimental designs were used rather than actual e-mail/blog experiences as stimuli. The results of this study provide some key strategic implications for companies that are seeking to enhance a successful viral marketing campaign.

Practical implications

This study suggests there is no “one size fits all” answer. A successful viral marketing campaign is specific to individual characteristics and the approaches used.

Originality/value

The present study combines related research – including communication theory, consumer value and involvement theory – to investigate the determinants of individuals’ intentions to share marketing information.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 48 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2008

Mu‐Lan Hsu and Kuan‐Yao Chiu

The purpose of this paper is to determine the value of I‐Ching (also called Book of Changes), the ancient Chinese book of wisdom, which has been used for thousands of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the value of I‐Ching (also called Book of Changes), the ancient Chinese book of wisdom, which has been used for thousands of years to help people make decisions in daily life. Recently, eastern and western scholars have begun discussing how to apply the wisdom of I‐Ching to the field of business administration, particularly decision‐making practices.

Design/methodology/approach

A content analysis method was adopted to uncover possible modern management decision‐making constructs. The single words approach did not find frequently appearing words that integrated decision‐making constructs in the context of I‐Ching. Further uncovering I‐Ching's administrative decision‐making approach, the managerial decision‐making model of I‐Ching is explained, including the premises, the decision contingencies, and the decision process.

Findings

By using an academic comparative analysis method, as it applies to managerial decision making, I‐Ching's early management decision‐making model is subsequently compared with western management decision models, which include rational decision making, bounded‐rationality decision making, intuitive decision making, implicit favorite decision making, and garbage‐can decision making.

Research limitations/implications

The majority of scholars that study I‐Ching focus on “practice divination” research, paying attention to the interpretation or critique of the text only. Unfortunately, related literature based upon a social science research foundation is limited.

Originality/value

The value of I‐Ching was determined to lie in allowing flexibility in the decision‐making process.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Noelia Sánchez-Casado, Juan Gabriel Cegarra-Navarro and Eva Tomaseti-Solano

Social networking sites (SNS) enable users to create their own public profiles within a web site. In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of people…

Abstract

Purpose

Social networking sites (SNS) enable users to create their own public profiles within a web site. In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of people spreading misleading information or rumours (i.e. counter-knowledge) about friends and other people thanks to social media platforms. The purpose of this paper is to identify the role played by social networks in the process of creating counter-knowledge, focusing on the counter-knowledge that users develop in the context of SNS and its effect on utilitarian benefits.

Design/methodology/approach

This study analyses these effects through an empirical investigation of 236 users of SNSs. The methodology involves the construction and analysis of a structural equation model from a review of relevant literature.

Findings

The results confirm that, although the context of SNSs is a variable that will lead to positive effects on counter-knowledge, the relationship between counter-knowledge and utilitarian benefits becomes statistically insignificant. The results also showed that the content on social networks may lead to higher levels of utilitarian benefits. This either amplifies or helps to encourage cooperation among users and providers of rumours, beliefs and assumptions about what they think is the truth.

Originality/value

From a user perspective, few, if any, studies of SNS have considered the relationship between the information collected and generated by SNS and counter-knowledge. Therefore, the results of this study lead the authors to advise managers of SNSs considering that most but not all the content on SNSs is associated with the spread of rumours, misinformation and unverified claims.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

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