Search results

1 – 10 of 33
Article
Publication date: 19 April 2022

Jeffrey Alwang, Alexis Villacis and Victor Barrera

This study explores the determinants of growth of credence-based exports of yerba mate from Paraguay, potential for increased export growth, and the fragility of the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study explores the determinants of growth of credence-based exports of yerba mate from Paraguay, potential for increased export growth, and the fragility of the credence-based export model. Much of the growth in value of yerba mate exports from Paraguay is due to positioning of the good within the universe of products where consumption is driven by perceptions of sustainable production and health benefits to consumers. Credence claims for yerba mate—benefits to indigenous producing communities, environmental sustainability under certain production processes, healthful alternatives to energy drinks—are now widely known, but the growth of this awareness came via a new entrepreneurial strategy of a single firm.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary information was collected through interviews of actors in the Paraguayan yerba mate value chain during spring/summer 2020. These included representatives from three exporting companies, processors, public institutions and indigenous producers.

Findings

The Paraguayan yerba mate export boom was stimulated through the careful cultivation of an image of healthful consumption and sustainable production processes. The cost of this cultivation was borne mainly by a single firm. Findings suggest that future marketing efforts will need to reinforce credence claims, highlighting the benefits to indigenous producers.

Research limitations/implications

This case study explores the determinants of growth of credence-based exports of yerba mate from Paraguay, potential for increased growth, and the fragility of the credence-based model.

Originality/value

Findings are supported by field interviews with value chain participants and detailed analysis of extant data. The paper is the first to discuss the fragility of relying on credence attributes for long-term demand growth.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Cleomara Salete Lewinski, Itamar Luís Gonçalves, Ana Cláudia Piovezan Borges, Nessana Dartora, Lauro Mera de Souza and Alice Teresa Valduga

– The aim of this paper is to evaluate the effects of ultraviolet (UV) light on the color, secondary metabolites and sensory acceptance of processed yerba-mate.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to evaluate the effects of ultraviolet (UV) light on the color, secondary metabolites and sensory acceptance of processed yerba-mate.

Design/methodology/approach

Samples were exposed to UV light for 72 hours. The colorimetric coordinates (L*, a* and b*) were analyzed every 6 hours, while secondary metabolites and sensory acceptance were assessed at the beginning and at the end of the experiment. Methylxanthines and phenolic compounds were quantified by ultra performance liquid chromatography photodiode array detectors and vegetable pigments by UV/visible spectrophotometry.

Findings

Decreases in methylxanthines, rutin and isomers of chlorogenic acids were found, along with an increase in isomers of dicaffeoylquinic acids. The product showed less sensory acceptance compared to the control. These results show that UV light treatment of yerba-mate accelerates the maturation process.

Practical implications

UV light can be used in yerba-mate maturation with a reduction time and can ensure microbiological safety with small changes in its phytochemical profile.

Originality/value

This paper is the first report of a novel strategy to investigate the yerba-mate maturation using UV light.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 45 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Cátia Nara Tobaldini Frizon, Camila Augusto Perussello, José Alfredo Sturion, Aline Francielle Fracasso and Rosemary Hoffmann-Ribani

Forasmuch as the consumer’s demand for food products that provide nutrition and health benefits has considerably increased in the past decade, the authors decided to join…

Abstract

Purpose

Forasmuch as the consumer’s demand for food products that provide nutrition and health benefits has considerably increased in the past decade, the authors decided to join two important Brazilian commodities in a high-nutrition drink: yerba mate (Ilex paraguariensis) is rich in several bioactive compounds, and soybean is a high-quality protein source. To optimize the design and maximize the acceptability of the beverage, the authors studied its stability during storage. The beverage developed allows enlarging of the potential market of yerba mate, taking profit of the growing call for the consumption of antioxidant foods and benefits small-scale producers.

Design/methodology/approach

Twelve beverages were formulated with extract of yerba mate from leaves of planted (P) and native trees (N), both enriched with water-soluble soy extract (WSE). Among all formulations, two of them, which were sensorially preferred in a previous study, were selected to investigate their market potential. During the six months of storage, microbiological analyses were performed and the parameters acidity, viscosity, pH and rutin content were assessed. Sensorial tests of acceptability and purchase intent were also conducted.

Findings

The drinks remained microbiologically adequate for consumption during six months of storage. High sensory acceptability and purchase intent scores were obtained for Beverage P. This drink resulted in smoother taste and presented a decrease in acidity and constant viscosity during the storage, while Beverage N had an increase in acidity and viscosity. The rutin loss at 120 days was 14.2 per cent for Drink P and 32.4 per cent for N, with a half-life of 423.6 and 185.3 days, respectively.

Originality/value

Given the quantified parameters, the beverage produced from leaves of planted trees (P) may be used as a novel high nutrition food suitable for the growing requirements of the yerba mate by-products market.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 45 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Itamar Luís Gonçalves, Nessana Dartora, Ana Cláudia Piovezan Borges, Ana Paula Picolo, Rogério Marcos Dallago, Lauro Mera de Souza and Alice Teresa Valduga

The purpose of this paper was to assess the changes in secondary metabolites and color during yerba-mate aging under controlled conditions. In Uruguay and Paraguay, the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to assess the changes in secondary metabolites and color during yerba-mate aging under controlled conditions. In Uruguay and Paraguay, the yerba-mate matured, in which chlorophyll degradation occurs, is preferred. For the matured product, the yerba-mate is stored for six months to one year.

Design/methodology/approach

Processed yerba-mate was submitted to 35°C and 80 per cent humidity during 42 days in a climatic chamber. Samples were collected every seven days, and the phenolic compounds/methylxanthines were quantified by ultra-performance liquid chromatography – photodiode array and chlorophylls/phaeophytins by spectrophotometry. L*, a* and b* colorimetric coordinates were measured.

Findings

The most expressive changes in the color occur in the first 14 days. At this time, 23.161 ± 2.984 per cent of total chlorophyll was degraded, considering that in 42 days, 37.458 ± 0.955 per cent is degraded, according to an exponential model. A positive correlation between theobromine amount and maturation time was found. This was verified by an increase in dicaffeoylquinic acid concentrations and small changes in chlorogenic acid isomers.

Practical implications

The results indicate that this is a viable accelerated yerba-mate maturation process according to economics and nutraceutics.

Originality/value

The paper has reported here a novel strategy to promote the yerba-mate maturation using controlled conditions.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 45 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 October 2020

Cleiton Frigo, Ederlan Magri, Julierme Zimmer Barbosa, Laudete Maria Sarteretto, Eloá Moura Araujo, Vander Freitas de Melo, Stephen Arthur Prior and Antônio Carlos Vargas Motta

Vehicular road traffic may represent an important soil and plant contamination source. In this context, the concentration of heavy metals (Cd, Pb, As, Sb, Ni, Cu, Fe, Al…

Abstract

Purpose

Vehicular road traffic may represent an important soil and plant contamination source. In this context, the concentration of heavy metals (Cd, Pb, As, Sb, Ni, Cu, Fe, Al, Mn and Zn) and macronutrients (Ca, Mg, K and P) was evaluated in yerba mate (Ilex paraguariensis St. Hil.) cultivations and in soils adjacent to highways.

Design/methodology/approach

The investigated yerba mate cultivations were located in southern Brazil. Plant tissue (young and old leaves and branches) and soil (0–10 cm) samples were collected at five distances from the highway (0–10, 10–20, 20–30, 30–40 and 40–50 m). Plant tissue was analyzed with and without washing to evaluate contributions from particulate deposition.

Findings

Although increases in soil pseudo-total concentrations of Cd, Cu, Ni, Zn, Fe, Mn, Ca and Mg were observed only at the Erechim site, geoaccumulation indices and enrichment factors (EFs) did not indicate any heavy metal pollution. These results indicate the existence of natural variation in soil. Cadmium was more concentrated in branches than in leaves, while the opposite was observed for Pb. High levels of Mn and Al were found in foliar tissue. In summary, highway proximity did not lead to heavy metal contamination of yerba mate under the evaluated conditions.

Originality/value

This research explores the possibility of heavy metal pollution in plantations of yerba mate adjacent to highways and indicates natural concentrations of toxic elements that exceed current legislation, which was an important discovery regarding the yerba mate production chain.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Krystel Haydamous Kahale, Carole Tranchant, Sarah Pakzad and Antoine G. Farhat

The aim of this study was to evaluate the individual effect of sumac (S), Turkish coffee (C) and yerba mate tea (Y) on the postprandial glycemic response to Lebanese…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study was to evaluate the individual effect of sumac (S), Turkish coffee (C) and yerba mate tea (Y) on the postprandial glycemic response to Lebanese mankoucheh, a common breakfast item in the Lebanese culture, and to determine the glycemic index (GI) of this food. S, C and Y are typical constituents of Lebanese meals. They may influence the postprandial glycemic response to carbohydrate-rich foods, but this has not been studied to date.

Design/methodology/approach

Twelve healthy normoglycemic adults consumed on separate days the following test meals: mankoucheh without S (M) with water (control meal); M prepared with single or double doses of S (S1 and S2) with water; M with 60 or 120 mL of unsweetened C; or M with 100 or 200 mL of unsweetened Y. Meals were prepared according to standardized recipes containing 50 g of available carbohydrates. Capillary blood glucose measures were taken at fast and six times after meal ingestion over a two hour period. The GI of mankoucheh was determined using a standard protocol.

Findings

The glycemic responses, evaluated at each time following meal ingestion, did not differ significantly among the seven meals, and neither did the incremental area under the glycemic response curves. The GI of mankoucheh was 61 ± 6, with no significant difference between M, M with S1 and M with S2.

Originality/value

This study contributes to better characterize the glycemic properties of S, C, Y and mankoucheh in conditions that closely resemble how these dietary items are used and consumed by some cultural groups.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 45 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Lucila Sánchez Boado, Raquel Maria Fretes and Luis Alberto Brumovsky

The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vivo the bioavailability of the Ilex paraguariensis polyphenols due to total polyphenols and changes in antioxidant capacity…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vivo the bioavailability of the Ilex paraguariensis polyphenols due to total polyphenols and changes in antioxidant capacity (AOC) in human plasma after an acute intake of 300 ml of an infusion of yerba maté (YM) for 120 minutes. Also, we evaluated the variation of plasma protein or plasma uric acid after the acute intake of YM infusion.

Design/methodology/approach

Seventeen healthy young volunteers participated in the determining plasma of total polyphenols concentration (TPC, Folin-Ciocalteu method), plasma AOC for ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and 2,2′-azinobis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid diammonium salt [ABTS] methods), plasmatic uric acid and plasma total protein over the 120 minutes test.

Findings

It was found that the bioavailability of YM polyphenols during 120 minutes was 49.3 ± 11.9 per cent, the TPC was increased to 6.0 ± 1.5 per cent, the plasma AOC was increased by FRAP 8.3 ± 3.3 per cent and by ABTS 6.0 ± 2.0 per cent and no significant variation of plasma protein or plasma uric acid was found.

Practical implications

Maté polyphenols has a thrifty effect on the natural antioxidant defenses of the body, which are beneficial to human health.

Originality/value

There was no information on the bioavailability of polyphenols in YM infusions prepared in its traditional form as “hot mate”.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 45 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

C.H.S. Ruxton and E.J. Gardner

Over‐the‐counter (OTC) weight management products are popular with the public. Manufacturers frequently claim beneficial effects of these products, however current…

1827

Abstract

Purpose

Over‐the‐counter (OTC) weight management products are popular with the public. Manufacturers frequently claim beneficial effects of these products, however current legislation does not compel them to support these claims with research. This paper identifies the key ingredients of OTC weight management products and evaluates evidence for their safety and efficacy.

Design/methodology/approach

Using Medline, published evidence on key ingredients and formulations was gathered. Contact was also made with manufacturers to ascertain whether unpublished data were available. All studies were assessed for quality. The efficacy and safety of the ingredients and formulations were then reviewed.

Findings

The results showed little evidence for most weight loss claims, with the exception of a formulation containing Yerba maté, Guarana and Damiana. In addition, studies on pyruvate, conjugated linoleic acid, and Citrus aurantium demonstrated positive effects on weight loss, suggesting that they may be useful in future formulations. Safety implications were noted for ephedrine.

Practical implications

Better labelling and supporting literature should be introduced by reputable manufacturers and retailers to help the public assess the efficacy of weight loss aids.

Research limitations/implications

Given the popularity of self‐treatment, there is a need for more manufacturers to submit their products to impartial clinical trials. OTC weight management products could be useful in addressing obesity, but most still need scientific evidence to demonstrate safety and effectiveness.

Originality/value

This review reviews the available evidence on ingredients of OTC weight management products, providing a unique guide to what works, and what doesn't.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 107 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 June 2007

C.H.S. Ruxton, L. Kirkwood, B. McMillan, D. St John and C.E.L. Evans

There are many herbal supplements on the market claiming to aid weight loss but few are evidence‐based. This study aims to test one such formulation.

Abstract

Purpose

There are many herbal supplements on the market claiming to aid weight loss but few are evidence‐based. This study aims to test one such formulation.

Design/methodology/approach

An over‐the‐counter herbal supplement containing yerba maté, guarana and damiana (YGD) was tested in 73 overweight health professionals for six weeks. Subjects were not asked to make any lifestyle changes.

Findings

Self‐reported weight, waist circumference and hip circumference reduced significantly, while 22 per cent of subjects experienced a clinically significant weight loss. The anthropometric changes were in line with other commercial diet and exercise programmes. Reported between‐meal hunger, and consumption of snacks reduced across the six weeks. Reported satiety after meals increased and subjects claimed to be more in control of snacking, emotional eating and portion sizes. A follow‐up at week ten, when 82 per cent of subjects had stopped taking YGD, revealed no additional reductions in weight or hip circumference. Fullness ratings had stabilised, while hunger ratings had increased. There were no consistent adverse effects that could reasonably be related to YGD.

Research limitations/implications

Taken alongside a 2001 randomised, placebo‐controlled trial, this study provides evidence that a YGD supplement can aid weight loss and reduce waist and hip circumference, probably by increasing satiety.

Originality/value

The growing market in weight management products brings with it a responsibility for manufacturers to provide evidence that their products work. This paper adds to the evidence base.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 109 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 22 September 2015

Richard K. Reed

The forests of eastern Paraguayan have been cleared, forcing the indigenous Mbyá-Guaraní to take refuge in cities. Rather than assimilate into the city’s underclass as…

Abstract

Findings

The forests of eastern Paraguayan have been cleared, forcing the indigenous Mbyá-Guaraní to take refuge in cities. Rather than assimilate into the city’s underclass as other indigenous people do, Mbyá remain on the margins of the national society and protest their land loss in increasingly public demonstrations against the government. This research points to the historical struggle that the Mbyá-Guaraní of eastern Paraguay have waged against the state to explain Mbyá identity and action in the urban environment.

Research limitations/implications

Recent work with indigenous refugees shows that dislocation entails not only a disruption of social ties, but efforts to reestablish identities and relations in their new conditions. This research explores the interplay of urban conditions and historic struggles in the development of these new indigenous identities for the Mbyá-Guarani.

Practical implications

Indigenous refugees in extreme poverty are a growing problem in urban Latin America. Once residents of the forest, these groups squat in vacant lots and scavenge for a living, ravaged by disease, drugs, alcohol, and sex work. This work seeks to identify the factors that lead some indigenous people to integrate into urban society, while others assert themselves against that system.

Details

Climate Change, Culture, and Economics: Anthropological Investigations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-361-7

Keywords

1 – 10 of 33