Search results

1 – 3 of 3
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2021

Liwei Hsu and Yen-Jung Chen

Visual stimulation affects the taste of food and beverages. This study aimed to understand how latte art affects coffee consumption by collecting participants' brainwave…

Abstract

Purpose

Visual stimulation affects the taste of food and beverages. This study aimed to understand how latte art affects coffee consumption by collecting participants' brainwave data and their taste responses.

Design/methodology/approach

Seventy subjects participated in a two-stage experiment. Electroencephalography (EEG) was employed to measure brainwave activity. With an interval of one week, each stage involved coffee consumption with and without latte art. The responses to the taste of the coffee were also collected for analysis.

Findings

Significant differences were found in the participants' alpha and beta brainwave bands. When drinking coffee with latte art, the participants' alpha bands were significantly lower, whereas the beta bands were higher. These findings were supported by Bayesian statistics. A significant increase was found in the participants' taste of sweetness and acidity with latte art, and Bayesian statistics confirmed the results for sweetness although the evidence on the increase in acidity was anecdotal. No difference was found in the taste of bitterness.

Originality/value

This study highlights the effect of latte art on coffee consumption. The authors analysed the empirical evidence from this two-stage experimental study in the form of the participants' brainwave data and their responses to taste. This study's original contribution is that it explored the crossmodal effects of latte art on consumers' taste of coffee from a neuroscientific perspective. The results of this study can provide empirical evidence on how to effectively use latte art in practical business environments.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 24 September 2019

Liwei Hsu and Yen-jung Chen

Music has a priming effect on product selection. The purpose of this paper is to extend the current understanding on this issue using an experimental design incorporating…

Abstract

Purpose

Music has a priming effect on product selection. The purpose of this paper is to extend the current understanding on this issue using an experimental design incorporating behavioural and brainwave data.

Design/methodology/approach

An experiment with 40 participants was conducted to explore how and why wine tasting preferences would be primed by different genres of musical stimuli. Electroencephalographic measurement was adopted to measure participant brainwave activity in two experiments, each involving two rounds of wine tasting, and the treatment was administered between the two rounds.

Findings

Significant associations between the musical stimulus genre and participant change in wine selection were found, and the musical stimuli resulted in different brainwave activities because participant β and γ wave activities significantly differed in the first and second wine tasting rounds. Correlational analyses indicated that α, β and γ wave activities generated by the musical stimuli were significantly but negatively correlated with α wave activity. α wave activity in the musical stimulus phases was significantly negatively correlated with β wave activity in the second round of wine tasting, and the other associations were significant and positive.

Originality/value

This study highlighted the priming effect of musical stimuli in wine tasting. Empirical evidence derived from experimental research was analysed with behavioural and brainwave data. This study’s original contribution is that it explored wine tasting preferences from a neuromarketing perspective. The results of this study can provide empirical evidence on how to effectively use music in marketing strategies.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 30 May 2020

Chia-Lin Hsu, Yen-Jung Pan, Qiao-Wen Yan and Min-Ren Yan

This study aims to examine the key determinants of word-of-mouth intentions among freshmen in a Taiwanese college. It investigates the causal relationships among different…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the key determinants of word-of-mouth intentions among freshmen in a Taiwanese college. It investigates the causal relationships among different indicators of organizational sustainable development.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical study is conducted on a sample of 3,159 college freshmen. A survey instrument with 41 measurement items are used to recognize the implementation of management practices at the college level. Descriptive statistical and multiple regression analyzes are performed to analyze the data, using SPSS software.

Findings

The results show that course identity, professional identity toward teachers, self-identity, learning attitude and satisfaction have a positive and significant impact on word-of-mouth intentions. Among these, satisfaction is the most crucial influencing factor. Colleges, particularly Taiwanese colleges competing in the field of higher education, must identify critical factors influencing the implementation of management practices to increase performance.

Practical implications

This study’s findings make a valuable contribution to understanding management practices in Taiwanese colleges. In addition, they serve as important guidelines for Taiwanese colleges to implement management practices effectively. The findings can also help improve organizational sustainable development, in view of the new insights they offer on the topic of the determinants of word-of-mouth intentions among Taiwanese college freshmen.

Originality/value

This study contributes to management practices in Taiwan-based colleges. It provides crucial information for decision-makers involved in the implementation of management practices in colleges and serves as a useful reference for further research in this area.

1 – 3 of 3