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Article
Publication date: 24 September 2018

Angela Gracia B. Cruz, Elizabeth Snuggs and Yelena Tsarenko

While theories of complex service systems have advanced important insights about integrated care, less attention has been paid to social dynamics in systems with finite…

Abstract

Purpose

While theories of complex service systems have advanced important insights about integrated care, less attention has been paid to social dynamics in systems with finite resources. This paper aims to uncover a paradoxical social dynamic undermining the objective of integrated care within an HIV care service system.

Design/methodology/approach

Grounded in a hermeneutic analysis of depth interviews with 26 people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) and drawing on Bourdieu’s (1984) theory of capital consumption to unpack dynamics of power, struggle and contestation, the authors introduce the concept of the service labyrinth.

Findings

To competently navigate the service labyrinth of HIV care, consumers adopt capital consumption practices. Paradoxically, these practices enhance empowerment at the individual level but contribute to the fragmentation of the HIV care labyrinth at the system level, ultimately undermining integrated care.

Research limitations/implications

This study enhances understanding of integrated care in three ways. First, the metaphor of the service labyrinth can be used to better understand complex care-related service systems. Second, as consumers of care enact capital consumption practices, the authors demonstrate how they do not merely experience but actively shape the care system. Third, fragmentation is expectedly part of the human dynamics in complex service systems. Thus, the authors discuss its implications. Further research should investigate whether a similar paradox undermines integrated care in better resourced systems, acute care systems and systems embedded in other cultural contexts.

Originality/value

Contrasted to provider-centric views of service systems, this study explicates a customer-centric view from the perspective of heterosexual PLWHA.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 52 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 July 2021

Nichola Robertson, Yelena Tsarenko, Michael Jay Polonsky and Lisa McQuilken

The purpose of this paper is to empirically examine the factors driving and mitigating the experienced vulnerabilities of women undergoing the transformative service of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically examine the factors driving and mitigating the experienced vulnerabilities of women undergoing the transformative service of in-vitro fertilisation (IVF), and how this influences women’s evaluations and intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptual framework was tested using quantitative data collected via an online survey of Australian women who have undergone IVF treatment. Hayes’ PROCESS macro was used to analyse the data.

Findings

The results indicate that women’s persistent goal-striving alongside their perceived personal sacrifices influence the association between their need for parenthood and their experienced vulnerability. Institutional factors such as IVF clinic technical and interpersonal quality influence these consumers’ IVF experience evaluations and word-of-mouth (WoM) intentions.

Research limitations/implications

This study’s results are limited to women who are undergoing IVF treatment. Further empirical work is needed to deepen the understanding of the role played by partners and other family members in women’s IVF experiences.

Practical implications

IVF clinics can reduce women’s experienced vulnerability by encouraging women who have a good probability of succeeding to persist in the pursuit of the goal of conceiving a child via IVF. This can be achieved by enabling and empowering them so that they give themselves the best chance during treatment, thus facilitating their control. Managing the expectations of those women with a lower probability of success is also recommended. The importance of the technical and interpersonal quality delivered by IVF clinics in influencing the positive evaluations and behavioural intentions of women experiencing vulnerabilities is further highlighted.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the transformative service research literature by: examining the IVF transformative experience, which has been largely overlooked; focussing on the intersection of transformative services and consumers experiencing vulnerability, which is an emerging research area; and testing a framework quantitatively that intermingles individual and institutional factors as antecedents and consequences of consumers’ experienced vulnerabilities, advancing the existing conceptual and qualitative work.

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2011

Yelena Tsarenko and Dewi Rooslani Tojib

The concept of forgiveness has received significant attention in the fields of philosophy and psychology. However, little is known about the application of this concept in…

Abstract

Purpose

The concept of forgiveness has received significant attention in the fields of philosophy and psychology. However, little is known about the application of this concept in the business domain. To address this deficiency, this paper aims to conceptualise forgiveness as a customer coping strategy in the context of service failure incidents. Specifically, deriving from both theories of emotion and coping, this article proposes a conceptual framework of consumer forgiveness in service encounters.

Design/methodology/approach

A critical synthesis of the literature on forgiveness, service failure, and service recovery was conducted to generate a conceptual exploration of the role of forgiveness in the business domain.

Findings

While previous consumer behaviour studies have explored the emotional and behavioural states of consumers after service incidents, they overlooked one critical intrinsic psychological aspect which has a long‐lasting effect on service outcomes: consumer forgiveness. Thus, the main focus of this study is to devise a conceptual framework of consumer forgiveness which highlights several stages through which consumers progress in their forgiveness process. A range of situational and contingent factors that may facilitate the consumer forgiveness process are also identified and rationalised in the model.

Research limitations/implications

Researchers of consumer behaviour will benefit from understanding the roots of forgiveness and how this complex process determines and influences the psychological state of consumers after service incidents. The proposed transactional model of forgiveness serves as a starting point to explore this virtually ignored concept in the services marketing domain. Empirical studies employing various research methodologies are needed to support this model.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first attempts to integrate the concept of forgiveness from the field of psychology into consumer behaviour research by highlighting the role of forgiveness as a coping strategy in the business domain.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2009

Riza Casidy Mulyanegara and Yelena Tsarenko

This paper aims to examine and compare the strength of personality and values in predicting brand preferences. It seeks to accomplish three main objectives. First, it will…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine and compare the strength of personality and values in predicting brand preferences. It seeks to accomplish three main objectives. First, it will evaluate the strength of personality and values in predicting consumers' brand preferences. Second, it will examine whether values exercise a mediating role between personality and brand preferences. Finally, it will examine the mediating role of prestige sensitivity in influencing brand preferences.

Design/methodology/approach

The study opted to use a quantitative approach involving 251 undergraduate students as the study participants. The constructs used in the study are taken from existing scales as well as self‐developed branding scales. Structural equation modeling technique is utilised for data analysis.

Findings

The paper provides empirical insights about how personality and values together affect brand preferences. It suggests that values are indeed better predictors of brand preferences and exercise both direct and indirect effects on brand preferences through the mediating role of prestige sensitivity.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the self‐report method used for personality assessment, there may be bias in terms of the nature of respondents' personality as expressed in the questionnaire.

Practical implications

The paper suggests implications for the development of a strong brand personality which can appeal to both consumer personality and values.

Originality/value

This paper poses interesting insights and empirical evidence with regard to the predictive power of personality and values on brand preferences within a fashion context.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2009

Yelena Tsarenko and Dewi Rooslani Tojib

This paper aims to develop a customer typology based on consumer attitude towards information privacy and examine the driving factors of privacy concern.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to develop a customer typology based on consumer attitude towards information privacy and examine the driving factors of privacy concern.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 456 Australian consumers who have applied for a credit card or mortgage is used in this study. Consumer concern with privacy statements, the privacy legislation at the federal level, trust and the willingness to disclose personal information for some form of compensation are used as drivers of consumer privacy in regression analysis. These variables are used in cluster analysis in order to segment financial consumers.

Findings

The results indicate that that the level of privacy concern is primarily driven by trust that far outweighs any concerns with privacy statements and the provision of nationally legislated safeguards. Furthermore, a cluster analysis reveals three distinctive customer segments in the domain of financial services: the pragmatist, indifferent, and competent.

Originality/value

This study is undertaken to advance our knowledge on consumer privacy concerns in the context of financial services and to segment financial services customers in relation to the disclosure of personal information. The study contributes to the literature and enhances our understanding not only on drivers of consumer privacy but also on specific areas of privacy concern among various customer segments.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 26 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Riza Casidy and Yelena Tsarenko

– The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between perceived benefits and church participation among regular and irregular church goers (ICG).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between perceived benefits and church participation among regular and irregular church goers (ICG).

Design/methodology/approach

The research incorporates a descriptive research design. In total, 564 questionnaires were completed by active and relapsed members of churches in Australia. Hierarchical regression analysis was conducted to examine the relationship between constructs.

Findings

This study provides empirical evidence that perceived spiritual and social benefits have a positive and significant relationship with church participation in both regular and ICG sample group. Perceived purpose-in-life (PIL) benefits are not related to church participation in both sample groups.

Practical implications

The findings may guide leaders of religious organisations to understand the importance of spiritual and social benefits in attracting prospective church members. The marketing message of religious organisation should therefore focus on spiritual and social appeals.

Originality/value

Past researchers have not looked into the dynamic relationships between perceived benefits and church participation among regular and irregular church members, particularly in Australia, hence research is to be called for in this area. The study provides a further empirical support for the importance of social benefits within the church settings.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Chris Dubelaar, Yelena Tsarenko and Mark Gabbott

This study examines performance measurement in on‐line securities companies in the Australian marketplace. Marketing managers of seven on‐line stock brokerage companies in…

Abstract

This study examines performance measurement in on‐line securities companies in the Australian marketplace. Marketing managers of seven on‐line stock brokerage companies in Australian capital cities were interviewed and their on‐line strategies and approaches were systematically reviewed and analysed. The findings suggest that only four of the seven companies were able to articulate a core value proposition and that only two companies used performance measurement in strategic decision‐making about the on‐line component of their businesses. None of the firms was able to draw a direct connection between the performance measures implemented and the value proposition they claimed to offer to their customers. These findings have important implications for both practitioners and academics as they indicate a substantial deficiency in both the theory and practice of on‐line performance measurement. Avenues for further research in the area of on‐line performance measurement are suggested.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 21 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2007

Mahesh S. Bhandari, Yelena Tsarenko and Michael Jay Polonsky

The purpose of this paper is to extend thinking on service recovery processes and satisfaction with service recovery, using multi‐dimensional consumer outcomes. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to extend thinking on service recovery processes and satisfaction with service recovery, using multi‐dimensional consumer outcomes. The objective of the work was to propose that satisfaction with service recovery should be based on customers' expectations of the recovery encounter, which would be shaped by their expectations of “non‐failed” encounters.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts a theoretical approach. Using the existing service recovery literature as well as the traditional services literature, the conceptual framework and associated research propositions are developed.

Findings

The proposed framework suggests that service recovery is a service encounter it its own right. The effectiveness of recovery encounters will be based on how encounters operate relative to customer expectations and experiences with regard to the recovery activity.

Research limitations/implications

The research propositions and proposed framework need further empirical investigation.

Practical implications

The proposed framework suggests that managing service recovery should be undertaken in a similar fashion to managing any service, and thus managers need to understand customers' recovery expectations. Organisations also need to consider how a recovery action impacts on a range of customer outcomes, as focusing on one aspect will not capture consumers' full set of behaviours.

Originality/value

The proposed model identifies that service recovery should be evaluated with regard to consumers' recovery expectations and satisfaction is not based on expectations with regard to non‐failed encounters.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2013

Felita R. Figueredo and Yelena Tsarenko

The purpose of this article is to develop and test a model to explain students' willingness to participate in sustainability programs. Specifically, the authors aimed to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to develop and test a model to explain students' willingness to participate in sustainability programs. Specifically, the authors aimed to determine those factors, apart from students' environmental orientation (self‐perception of “being green”), that influence students' willingness to participate in sustainability programs.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted at one of the largest Australian universities, with 168 student respondents. A linear regression model with a bootstrapping method was applied to estimate direct and indirect effects. The model tested the indirect effects of three mediators: concern for environmental issues, educational activities, and promotion of university sustainable initiatives.

Findings

The results from the empirical study show strong support for indirect effects. While students' environmental orientation is an antecedent of their willingness to participate in sustainability programs, the strongest mediator in this process is concern for environmental issues, followed by university educational activities and university promotion of sustainable initiatives.

Originality/value

This is the first study set in an Australian University that analyses those factors affecting the students' degree of willingness to participate in university‐initiated sustainability activities. The findings from this study are of interest to the higher education sector which plays an important role in both raising environmental awareness among students, and nurturing them as environmentally responsible members of the global community. The results of this study can be used to encourage student participation in on‐campus sustainable activities which can be carried over when they graduate.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2013

Kathryn Lefroy and Yelena Tsarenko

The goal of this study is to examine the influence of resources provided to nonprofit organisations by corporate partners on the achievement of nonprofits' social and…

Abstract

Purpose

The goal of this study is to examine the influence of resources provided to nonprofit organisations by corporate partners on the achievement of nonprofits' social and organisational objectives, accounting for mediation effects of dependence and relationship. This goal is investigated from the perspective of nonprofit organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

Following 20 preliminary in-depth interviews, an online survey was administered to people working in nonprofit industry who had experience working with their organisation's corporate partnership. With 273 completed questionnaires, the authors tested the model with mediation analyses, using bias-corrected bootstrap confidence intervals method.

Findings

Although reputation, non-financial resources and cash investments have strong and positive effects on achieving social and organisational objectives, these relations are fully mediated by dependence and relationship between partners. Further analysis shows that relationship is a significantly stronger mediator than dependence on the effect of reputation in regards to the achievement of both sets of objectives.

Originality/value

This article builds on marketing knowledge, using resource dependence theory to focus on the effects of corporate-provided resources on nonprofit organisations; a topic largely unexplored in extant literature. It is the first study to operationalise and empirically examine the specific effects of different types of resources on specific nonprofit performance objectives.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 47 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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