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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2021

Kim-Lim Tan and Peik Foong Yeap

Grounding our research in the conservation of resources (COR) theory and the job demands-resources (JD-R) theory, this study addresses the research gap of examining the…

Abstract

Purpose

Grounding our research in the conservation of resources (COR) theory and the job demands-resources (JD-R) theory, this study addresses the research gap of examining the relationship between meaningful work and dimensions of job burnout with work engagement as the mediator, especially in times of the COVID-19 pandemic. It also attempts to understand if age plays a role in moderating the effect of these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

This study collected data using a questionnaire protocol that was adapted and refined from the original scales in existing studies. The partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) was used to analyze data collected from 530 social workers working in New Zealand nonprofit organizations (NPO).

Findings

Results indicated that meaningful work only addressed one dimension of job burnout. Work engagement was found to have mediating effects on the relationships between meaningful work and all the dimensions of job burnout. Age does not have any moderating effect on these relationships.

Originality/value

This study addresses the lack of literature that collectively examines the constructs of meaningful work, dimensions of job burnout and work engagement in the same model. In doing so, this study provides a unique verification of job burnout as a multidimensional construct. At the same time, this study offers insights into the effect of these constructs in NPOs, unraveling the complexities that drive these NPOs' human resources (HR) processes.

Details

Management Decision, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Ridhwan Fontaine, Stanley Richardson and Yeap Peik Foong

This article revisits cross‐cultural management in Malaysia by challenging some fundamental assumptions. Most models of culture, such as Hofstede’s, assume that a country…

Abstract

This article revisits cross‐cultural management in Malaysia by challenging some fundamental assumptions. Most models of culture, such as Hofstede’s, assume that a country is reasonably homogeneous to make an analysis meaningful. We argue, conceptually and by providing empirical data that Malaysia is not a homogeneous country, and therefore Hofstede’s model is not suitable in Malaysia. Although this article deals with Malaysia specifically, there are a number of countries where Hofstede’s assumption might not work. In this context, we use Malaysia as an exemplar. We conclude that a better alternative is the model of Schwartz.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 July 2008

Yeap Peik Foong and Stanley Richardson

The aim of this paper is to investigate the perceptions of Malaysian employees of ABC MSC (a Japanese company in Malaysia) in order to recommend changes in management practices.

5105

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to investigate the perceptions of Malaysian employees of ABC MSC (a Japanese company in Malaysia) in order to recommend changes in management practices.

Design/methodology/approach

Fieldwork was conducted using participant observation and interviews. Participant observation was conducted to investigate the flow of information, the implementation of decisions made by the top Japanese managers, problem resolution, and the reaction of the local staff to management practices. The interviews highlighted communication problems which have existed between the Japanese CEO and the local telecommunications companies since the company started operations in 1997.

Findings

Even thought the company is backed by a financially strong parent company in Japan and has a lot of growth potential, this potential remains partially untapped due to management strategies of the company headquarters.

Research limitations/implications

Japan remains an important Foreign Direct Investment country in Malaysia. The perceptions of employees of Japanese companies in Malaysia are worth investigating since changes of management strategies in the home country affect the direction and operations of the overseas subsidiaries. Further research should be carried out in other Japanese companies in Malaysia.

Practical implications

Suggestions to improve the management strategies are discussed.

Originality/value

It is believed that no other Japanese company in Malaysia has been investigated in this way before. This paper's findings should be useful to many expatriate managers in Malaysia.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

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