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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2007

Keith Jones and Yamuna Kaluarachchi

This paper seeks to report the findings of a research project that observed and monitored the performance of a four‐year strategic partnering agreement between a…

1511

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to report the findings of a research project that observed and monitored the performance of a four‐year strategic partnering agreement between a consortium of Registered Social Landlords (AMPHION) and their contracting partner as they procured approximately 800 new houses, across 33 separate development projects.

Design/methodology/approach

The research project used a combination of in‐depth case studies (of individual housing projects and the relationship between the client group and their main contractor) supplemented by quantitative measures of project performance (Key Performance Indicators) and integrated workshops to study the operational factors that affected the success of the partnering initiative.

Findings

The paper concludes that failures to manage expectations within and between partners undermined confidence and trust in the partnering process.

Research limitations/implications

Whilst strategic partnering within the UK social housing sector was immature at the time of the study, the lessons learned have implications for other organisations considering strategic partnering relationships.

Originality/value

Evidence is provided from a long‐term study of strategic partnering which explores the dynamic nature of strategic partnering and its impact on success. Very few studies have addressed this issue.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 September 2013

Yamuna Kaluarachchi

The purpose this paper is to examine how aware and prepared the elderly and a number of related housing associations (HAs) are of extreme weather events and the impact on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose this paper is to examine how aware and prepared the elderly and a number of related housing associations (HAs) are of extreme weather events and the impact on their built assets as a result of climate change. It investigates how extreme weather and associated risks are perceived and the measures taken to protect the assets.

Design/methodology/approach

Desk research and two questionnaire surveys were conducted to collect data and information in relation to the awareness of extreme weather events and how built assets are adapted as a response. Survey results were tabulated and analysed using qualitative coding techniques and examined to identify relationships and patterns across different criteria in relation to awareness and built form adaptation to extreme weather events.

Findings

The surveys illustrate that awareness is high but the actions carried out as adaptations do not significantly reduce risks. Lack of personalisation of the risk and the resulting avoidance behaviour seems to prevent any considerable actions being taken. Thus, the elderly seem to accept basic energy saving measures as extreme weather adaptations rather than seek substantial actions that minimise risk to their houses. The results highlight the need to identify different design, construction and management solutions to improve resilience of different dwelling types to different economic sectors and different community groups.

Research limitations/implications

The HA survey sample is too small to derive general conclusions but illustrates the varying positions of different organisations. Future research will further the survey with a larger sample and extend to local authorities (LAs).

Practical implications

The findings provide valuable information and insights to all related stakeholders in formulating programmes in securing built assets in extreme weather events.

Social implications

Provide an understanding of the awareness and the preparedness of a vulnerable group, the elderly, and their dwellings to extreme weather events.

Originality/value

While the government hold consultations and dissemination events at national and regional levels, individual community groups and local agencies who are directly involved in providing services are not yet engaged in this dialogue. These two surveys made an attempt to gauge the awareness and the preparedness of the respondents of two such segments, in adapting their homes and built assets as a response to extreme weather associated risks.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 April 2008

Keith Jones and Yamuna Kaluarachchi

The purpose of this paper is to describe the problems encountered and the solutions developed when using benchmarking and key performance indicators (KPIs) to monitor a…

2310

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the problems encountered and the solutions developed when using benchmarking and key performance indicators (KPIs) to monitor a major UK social house building innovation (change) programme. The innovation programme sought improvements to both the quality of the house product and the procurement process.

Design/methodology/approach

Benchmarking and KPIs were used to quantify performance and in‐depth case studies to identify underlying cause and effect relationships within the innovation programme.

Findings

The inherent competition between consortium members; the complexity of the relationship between the consortium and its strategic partner; the lack of an authoritative management control structure; and the rapidly changing nature of the UK social housing market all proved problematic to the development of a reliable and robust monitoring system. These problems were overcome by the development of multi‐dimensional benchmarking model that balanced the needs and aspirations of the individual organisations with the broader objectives of the consortium.

Research limitations/implications

Whilst the research methodology provides insight into the factors that affected the performance of a major innovation programme its findings may not be representative of all projects.

Practical implications

The lessons learnt should assist those developing benchmarking models for multi‐client consortia.

Originality/value

The work reported in this paper describes an inclusive approach to benchmarking in which a multiple client group and their strategic partner sought to work together for shared gain. Very few papers have addressed this issue.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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