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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2019

Yam B. Limbu and Shintaro Sato

By testing a moderated mediation model, the purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating role of credit card self-efficacy in the relationship between credit card…

1996

Abstract

Purpose

By testing a moderated mediation model, the purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating role of credit card self-efficacy in the relationship between credit card literacy and financial well-being. The authors further examine if credit card number moderates this effect.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for the study were collected from 427 college students. The PROCESS macros in IBM SPSS Statistics 23 was used to assess the hypothesized relationships.

Findings

Credit card literacy positively influences financial well-being through self-efficacy. However, this effect is stronger when college students own fewer credit cards.

Practical implications

Banks and credit card issuers, policymakers and colleges and universities should place a greater emphasis on credit card literacy programs that enhance students’ general understanding of credit card terms and conditions and confidence in their ability to effectively use and manage their credit cards.

Originality/value

To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine the relationship between credit card literacy, self-efficacy and financial well-being.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 3 July 2020

Yam B. Limbu, Marta Giovannetti and Silvio Cardinali

The main objective of this study is to assess the applicability and robustness of the information motivation behavioural skills (IMB) model in determining dietary…

Abstract

Purpose

The main objective of this study is to assess the applicability and robustness of the information motivation behavioural skills (IMB) model in determining dietary supplement usage of pregnant and breastfeeding women. More specifically, we examine the indirect effects of online social capital and internet use for health information on dietary supplement usage through self-efficacy and the moderating role of educational attainment.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was collected from 415 pregnant and breastfeeding Italian women using a self-administered questionnaire. Hypotheses were tested using Hayes's (2013) PROCESS macro for SPSS.

Findings

Internet use for health information is directly associated with dietary supplement usage. Online social capital and internet use for health information positively influence dietary supplement usage through self-efficacy. However, the results from moderated mediation analyses show that the mediation effects are moderated by educational attainment so that indirect relationships were stronger among women with a lower level of education than among those with a higher level of education.

Practical implications

Dietary supplement marketers and public health agencies can develop and implement dietary supplement promotional materials and interventions by disseminating information through the internet and social media and by strengthening social ties on online networking sites.

Originality/value

The originality of this study lies in the use of the IMB model as a theoretical framework to examine the mediating role of self-efficacy and the moderating role of education in explaining the mechanism of how online social capital and internet use for health information influence dietary supplement usage.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Yam B. Limbu

By applying the information-motivation-behavioral (IMB) skills model, the purpose of this paper is to examine the direct and indirect effects of credit card knowledge and…

3840

Abstract

Purpose

By applying the information-motivation-behavioral (IMB) skills model, the purpose of this paper is to examine the direct and indirect effects of credit card knowledge and social motivation on credit card misuse behavior mediated through credit card self-efficacy among college students in the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 427 participants was surveyed. Structural equation modeling was used to assess the hypothesized model.

Findings

Credit card knowledge and social motivation were inversely associated with credit card misuse mediated through credit card self-efficacy. Credit card knowledge had a direct negative relationship with credit card misuse. The results confirm the theoretical relationships in the IMB model.

Practical implications

The results offer several implications for bank marketers and policy makers. The IMB model could be used to predict credit card abuse among college students; credit card literacy programs should incorporate strategies that can enhance students’ knowledge, social motivation, and behavioral skills with regard to responsible use of credit cards.

Originality/value

This study is unique in that it applies the IMB model to examine predictors of credit card misuse among college students.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 September 2021

Tianfu Wang, Yam B. Limbu and Xing Fang

The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic unprecedentedly shocks the market. Little is known about the impact of COVID-19 on brand engagement across country-of-origin…

Abstract

Purpose

The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic unprecedentedly shocks the market. Little is known about the impact of COVID-19 on brand engagement across country-of-origin (COO) and country-of-market (COM). To address the gap, this study examines how the spread of the COVID-19 affects consumer brand engagement on social media for global brands through the mechanisms of the COO and consumer animosity.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collect consumer engagement activity data from Facebook for eight global smartphone brands and match it with the COVID-19 statistics. Ordinary least square (OLS) models are used to estimate the impact on global brands brought by the spread of the COVID-19.

Findings

The results show that consumer brand engagement decreases for all brands in a COM as the number of confirmed COVID-19 new cases increases in the COM. Consumer brand engagement decreases for a brand across all COM as the number of confirmed COVID-19 new cases increases in the brand’s COO. If a brand’s COO is imputed for the pandemic, its consumer brand engagement will receive additional negative impacts across all COM.

Originality/value

This study enriches the COO literature by showing how the spread of a pandemic affects consumer brand engagement via COO and discovers the moderating role of consumer animosity.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

Keywords

Content available
738

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Article
Publication date: 16 July 2018

Yam B. Limbu, C. Jayachandran, Christopher McKinley and Jeonghwan Choi

People living on poverty-level incomes in developing nations face unique health challenges as compared to those in developed nations. New insights emerge from a bottom of…

Abstract

Purpose

People living on poverty-level incomes in developing nations face unique health challenges as compared to those in developed nations. New insights emerge from a bottom of the pyramid context (India) where culture-based health notions, preventive orientation and health resources differ from developed western health orientations and resources. The purpose of this paper is to explore how structural and cognitive social capital indirectly influence preventive health behavior (PHB) through perceived health value.

Design/methodology/approach

The participants for this study include rural people from Tamil Nadu, a state of India who are classified as those living below poverty level based on a per capita/per day consumption expenditure of Rupees 22.50 (an equivalent of US$0.40 a per capita/per day) (Planning Commission, Government of India, 2012). The study included a total number of 635 participants (312 males and 323 females). Relatively a high response rate (79 percent) was achieved through personal contacts and telephone solicitation, cash incentive and multiple follow-ups. Participants completed a questionnaire assessing structural and cognitive social capital, preventative health behavior, perceived health value, and health locus of control (HLC).

Findings

The results show that perceived health value mediates the relationship between cognitive social capital and PHB. Specifically, cognitive social capital influences BoP people’s assessment of benefits of engaging in PHB, that, in turn, influences PHB. In addition, the findings showed that HLC moderates the effect of social capital on PHB. Social capital positively related to enhanced PHB only among those who believe that health outcomes are controllable.

Originality/value

The authors findings indicate that cognitive social capital has enormous potential in promoting health intervention and the health of poor communities, a sentiment shared by prior researchers (Glenane-Antoniadis et al., 2003; Fisher et al., 2004; Martin et al., 2004; Weitzman and Kawachi, 2000). Overall, from a theoretical, empirical and methodological perspective, the current study offers a unique contribution to the social capital and PHB literature. First, drawing from the HBM and HLC, the findings provide a more nuanced explanation of how distinct aspects of social capital predict PHB. Specifically, the relationship between social capital and PHB is qualified by the extent one perceives personal control over her health. In addition, the cognitive component of social capital influences PHB through perceptions of health value.

Details

Health Education, vol. 118 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 June 2019

Yam B. Limbu, Christopher McKinley, Rajesh K. Gautam, Ajay K. Ahirwar, Pragya Dubey and C. Jayachandran

The purpose of this paper is to examine the indirect effects of nutritional knowledge and attitude toward food label use on food label use through self-efficacy and trust…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the indirect effects of nutritional knowledge and attitude toward food label use on food label use through self-efficacy and trust, as well as whether gender moderates this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of Indian adults with multiple chronic conditions was surveyed about their nutritional knowledge, attitude, self-efficacy and use of food labels. Hypotheses were tested using Hayes’s (2013) PROCESS macro for SPSS.

Findings

The results show that nutritional knowledge and attitude toward food label use positively predict food label use through self-efficacy and trust. However, these mediation effects are moderated by gender such that the indirect relationship is stronger among men than women.

Practical implications

Food marketers and government agencies engaged in nutrition education campaigns should aim to increase patients’ confidence in comprehending food label information.

Social implications

Since food labels can be a valuable tool to help patients with chronic diseases to make informed decisions about their diet and lifestyle, regulators may consider mandating nutritional labels on foods to help them improve their food or dietary choices.

Originality/value

This study uniquely applies Fisher and Fisher’s (1992) information–motivation–behavioral skills model as a theoretical framework to examine the influence of nutrition knowledge and attitude toward food label use on food label usage of Indian patients with multiple chronic diseases.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 October 2019

Yam B. Limbu, Long Pham and Manveer Mann

This study aims to examine relationships between corporate social responsibility (CSR) toward two key stakeholder groups – patients and society and hospital brand…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine relationships between corporate social responsibility (CSR) toward two key stakeholder groups – patients and society and hospital brand advocacy, and the mediating role of trust and patient-hospital identification (PHI) and the moderating role of hospital type on these associations.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample of 455 hospital patients was surveyed in Vietnam.

Findings

The results suggest that both CSR toward society and patients are positively related to brand advocacy. The influence of CSR toward patients on brand advocacy was stronger for private hospitals than public hospitals. Trust and PHI independently and partially mediate relationships between both stakeholder groups of CSR and brand advocacy with the exception of the trust, which fully mediates the relationship between CSR toward society and brand advocacy. Trust and PHI serve as serial mediators.

Practical implications

Hospitals can promote patients’ organic word of mouth through CSR initiatives and focusing on the reliability, safety and quality of care.

Originality/value

This study examines the mediation effects of trust and PHI and moderating role of hospital type in the relationships between two components of CSR effort and hospital brand advocacy.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Bruce A. Huhmann and Yam B. Limbu

The purpose of this paper is to explore ethical issues related to pharmaceutical marketers’ social media efforts including the prevalence and forms of direct-to-consumer…

2860

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore ethical issues related to pharmaceutical marketers’ social media efforts including the prevalence and forms of direct-to-consumer web 2.0 advertising (eDTCA) and corporate social responsibility (CSR) messages across social networking sites (SNSs). One goal is to determine if these eDTCA posts comply with draft guidelines issued by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Design/methodology/approach

Content analysis of ten pharmaceutical marketers’ SNS posts documented the frequency and types of posts devoted to eDTCA, drug risks and benefits, CSR, and other purposes.

Findings

eDTCA represents about 35 percent of all pharmaceutical firm SNS posts and primarily communicates help-seeking messages via Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube. Firms also promote their ethical image through CSR-related posts. These posts primarily highlight employee-focussed and community-focussed initiatives. Analysis of consumer behavior in response to each post shows that eDTCA affects only liking of YouTube videos, but CSR increases behavior responses on all SNSs except LinkedIn.

Social implications

Despite absence of final guidance, pharmaceutical marketers seem to abide by FDA draft social media guidance. In line with the FDA’s draft fair-balance regulations, almost all product-claim eDTCA posts state both benefit and risk information. Nevertheless, the FDA should issue final eDTCA guidance without delay consistent with traditional media direct-to-consumer advertising guidance. This should benefit consumers through consistency with their existing advertising literacy competencies.

Originality/value

The study represents an initial attempt to document ethical issues in the current state-of-the-practice of pharmaceutical social media marketing related to eDTCA and CSR.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 34 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 July 2019

Devon Johnson, Yam B. Limbu, C. Jayachandran and P. Raghunadha Reddy

This paper aims to examine the effect of customer-to-customer (C2C) interaction while using a service on the willingness of consumers to engage in altruistic customer…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the effect of customer-to-customer (C2C) interaction while using a service on the willingness of consumers to engage in altruistic customer participation (CP) or co-production efforts aimed at helping other customers. It further examines the role of consumer skepticism toward the service category in moderating the effects of C2C interaction on altruistic CP and customer satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey methodology was used to collect data from 374 consumers of health-care services in India. The data collection involved interviews of patients visiting diabetes clinics and focused primarily on the interaction between customers and their willingness to participate in educating members of the community on diabetic self-care.

Findings

The analysis shows that C2C interaction positively affects customer satisfaction and willingness to engage in altruistic CP. Consumer category skepticism does not moderate the effect of C2C interaction on customer willingness to engage in altruistic CP. However, category skepticism does have the moderating effect of significantly reducing the positive effect of C2C interaction on customer satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

Data for this study were collected via interviews of consumers in India. Each consumer was interviewed by a trained interviewer. Although the authors do not detect any systematic influence in the results, the possibility of bias is acknowledged. Regarding the research implications, the finding that category skepticism does not moderate the effect of C2C interaction on willingness to engage in altruistic CP suggest that ultimately consumers may have stronger commitment and loyalty to themselves and that their relationships with the firm’s might be peripheral.

Practical implications

The study finds that consumer skepticism toward a service category can have adverse effects for service co-creation. The authors advise managers in troubled industries not to focus exclusively on improving brand differentiation but to also consider working with major industry players and regulators to address the deepest fears of consumers.

Originality/value

The findings have implications for the service dominant logic of marketing in that it suggests that category skepticism is disruptive to the value integration process on which service co-creation relies for value creation. This has strong implications for how managers should structure their interaction processes with customers and for future research that seeks to them prove customer productivity.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 53 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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