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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2019

Ya-Hui Ling

This paper aims to examine the potential moderating effect of knowledge management on the influence of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on organizational performance.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the potential moderating effect of knowledge management on the influence of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on organizational performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaire data were collected from 170 distinct companies in Taiwan.

Findings

The results confirm the positive influence of CSR on organizational performance. There are also some interesting moderating effects of knowledge management in the CSR–performance relationship.

Originality/value

A major contribution of this study is its confirmation of the context-dependence nature of CSR and the potential moderating effect of knowledge management between CSR and organizational performance.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. 49 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2019

Ya-Hui Ling

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of managerial cultural values and the contextual environment (country of origin and country of operation) on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of managerial cultural values and the contextual environment (country of origin and country of operation) on corporate social responsibility (CSR) investments in three Asian countries.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 150 questionnaires were collected from 150 companies located in Taiwan, Malaysia and Singapore. The potential influence of ethnicity on cultural values was controlled by collecting data from ethnic Chinese managers.

Findings

The results show that senior managers, especially their cultural values, play a crucial role in directing Asian companies’ CSR investments. In addition, the context (a firm’s country of origin and country of operation) also differentiates the cultural values and CSR investments in these three countries.

Originality/value

The study adds to the understanding of the influence of managerial cultural values and context on various aspects of CSR. Especially, the study offers valuable managerial implications for CSR implementation from the Chinese management perspective. Considering the fast global expansion of Chinese companies, the results concerning how Chinese managers’ cultural values influence their CSR investments priority offer valuable managerial implications. The comparisons of cultural values and CSR investments priority among ethnic Chinese managers in different contextual environments also serve as good starting points for future studies.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2007

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/00483480710716759. When citing…

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/00483480710716759. When citing the article, please cite: Bih-Shiaw Jaw, Ya-Hui Ling, Christina Yu-Ping Wang, Wen-Ching Chang, (2007), “The impact of culture on Chinese employeesʼ work values”, Personnel Review, Vol. 36 Iss: 1, pp. 128 - 144.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 10 February 2012

Ya‐Hui Ling

The main purpose of this study is to explain a firm's global initiatives from the intellectual capital (IC) perspective.

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this study is to explain a firm's global initiatives from the intellectual capital (IC) perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

This study presents empirical evidence on the relationships among intellectual capital, business environment, and global initiatives using a sample of firms located in Taiwan but competing in the global market. Altogether 168 companies took part in the study.

Findings

The findings have confirmed that intellectual capital is positively associated with a firm's global initiatives. There is also moderating effect of the business environment on the relationship between intellectual capital and global initiatives. The important role of intellectual capital is highlighted for firms intending to compete in the international arena. The importance of human capital (top management teams' visionary leadership) also increases as the environment becomes more dynamic.

Originality/value

The dimensions and measures provided by this study might serve as a starting point for further studies on the management of intellectual capital in the international context. With a longitudinal study design and large‐scale questionnaire survey, the study might enrich the existing literature by identifying the intellectual capital‐global initiatives relationship and exploring the moderating effect of the environment on the intellectual capital‐global initiatives relationship. The study might further contribute to the literature by focusing on Taiwan rather than a developed Western economy as employed in related work.

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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2011

Ya‐Hui Ling and Bih‐Shiaw Jaw

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationships among top management teams' (TMS) entrepreneurial leadership, international human capital management (IHCM), and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationships among top management teams' (TMS) entrepreneurial leadership, international human capital management (IHCM), and global competitiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

Given the exploratory nature of this research, the authors adopted a purposive sampling process and targeted companies headquartered in Taiwan but with foreign subsidiaries. In addition to in‐depth interview, a questionnaires survey was administered to secure information from either top managers or human resources professionals. Altogether, 114 companies took part in the study.

Findings

The results indicated that entrepreneurial leadership of TMS not only had direct positive influences on a firm's IHCM, but also had indirect positive influences on a firm's global competiveness through the meditating effects of IHCM.

Originality/value

One contribution of this study is the development of appropriate metrics to measure a firm's “IHCM” practices that enhance a firm's global competiveness. A second contribution is the development of metrics of a firm's global competiveness and to explain a firm's global competiveness from a human capital management perspective. Additionally, this study contributed to the literature by empirically investigating the mediating effect of IHCM on the relationship between TMS entrepreneurial leadership and global competiveness relationship.

Details

Journal of Chinese Human Resources Management, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8005

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 January 2007

Bih‐Shiaw Jaw, Ya‐Hui Ling, Christina Yu‐Ping Wang and Wen‐Ching Chang

The purpose of this article is to investigate the detailed relationships between Chinese cultural values (Confucian dynamism, individualism, masculinity, and power…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to investigate the detailed relationships between Chinese cultural values (Confucian dynamism, individualism, masculinity, and power distance) and work values (self‐enhancement, contribution to society, rewards and stability, openness to change, and power and status) in an integrated model. Further attempts are also made to explain the above relationship in terms of different cultural exposure experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample was collected from China (selected from after‐work classes for Chinese businessmen in China) and Australia (overseas Chinese living or working in Sydney) by questionnaires. Altogether, 185 respondents took part in the study. SEM was used to test the relationship between Chinese cultural values and work values, and difference analysis was employed to test the impact of respondents' Western cultural exposure experiences.

Findings

Interesting results are found concerning Chinese employees' cross‐cultural work values. The study not only confirms the impact of cultural values on work values, but also brings some new thoughts on Hoftstede's belief that instead of high masculinity and individualism, Confucian dynamism is the main cultural value to foster self‐enhancement and most work value of Chinese employees.

Research limitations/implications

Because China is a complex country, the limited Chinese sample should not be taken as representative. The current study did not differentiate respondents' demographic differences. Hence some demographic variables may have produced some of the intergroup differences reported in this study.

Practical implications

The findings provide useful input for managers who are seeking to develop effective working relationships with Chinese counterparts.

Originality/value

This paper enriches existing Chinese values studies and serves as a starting point for future research concerning the detailed relationship between Chinese cultural values and work values.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 22 April 2012

Abstract

Details

Journal of Chinese Human Resources Management, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8005

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 October 2014

Abstract

Details

Journal of Chinese Human Resource Management, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8005

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Article
Publication date: 21 March 2019

Shan-Huei Wang, Chung-Jen Chen, Andy Ruey-Shan Guo and Ya-Hui Lin

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships among choice of industry diversification, capabilities and business group performance, as well as to point out…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships among choice of industry diversification, capabilities and business group performance, as well as to point out the potential concern about endogenous role of industry diversification.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data from the top 100 business groups in Taiwan from TEJ database. This study uses Heckman’s two-step estimation procedure and contingency model to achieve unbiased results and examine our hypotheses.

Findings

The results of this study find that if business groups’ marketing or operational capabilities are strong they should adopt a high level of diversification strategy and if business groups’ R&D capability is strong they should adopt a low level one. The results of this study also show that the endogenous problem of industry diversification exists, and needs to be considered. Moreover, our finding confirms the importance of capability–strategy fit, which, in turn, can achieve better performance.

Practical implications

On average, high industry diversification groups perform better than low industry diversification groups after controlling for endogeneity issues. Business groups can achieve better performance if their strategy choices match the capabilities they encounter. Managers should pay attention to strategy-capability fit issues. Specifically, they should review their organizational capabilities as well as check their strategies within firms.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first that attempts to explore the endogenous role of diversification strategy choices, and empirical examine strategy-capability fit on business group performance.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 58 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 October 2019

Atheer Abdullah Mohammed, Abdul Hafeez Baig and Raj Gururajan

The purpose of this paper is to develop a theoretical model and investigate the relationship between talent management (TM) processes and knowledge creation (KC) in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a theoretical model and investigate the relationship between talent management (TM) processes and knowledge creation (KC) in Australian public and private universities. This is because of the pragmatic advantages for organisations that focus on talents and knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

This research adopted the mixed-methods design. The sample comprised 23 individuals for the qualitative study and 286 individuals for the quantitative survey questionnaire, all conducted in nine public and private universities in Australia.

Findings

The qualitative outcomes were utilised to develop the quantitative survey statement. These outcomes are based on a three-stage method of thematic analysis. The core conclusion of the quantitative study is that there is a significantly positive influence on TM processes (TMPs) on KC.

Research limitations/implications

The principle limitation of this study was the scope. It only targeted one country (Australia), one state (Queensland) and a part of the higher education sector (the university).

Practical implications

This research designed a quantitative instrument of TMPs and KC for the Australian educational institutions. The instrument is severely designed and comprehensively conceptualised utilising social, excellent, performance, strategic, behavioural and developmental concepts within TMPs with innovative, informational and technological concepts underlining KC within the Australian public and private universities in Queensland.

Originality/value

The study adds value to both TM and knowledge management literature through designing a conceptual model that links both of these variables in one tool regarding the university sector.

Details

Journal of Industry-University Collaboration, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-357X

Keywords

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