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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2011

Xuezhu Bai and William Roberts

This paper aims at building up a comprehensive framework for integrating existing leadership theories from the perspective of Taoism, the well‐known oriental philosophy…

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4472

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims at building up a comprehensive framework for integrating existing leadership theories from the perspective of Taoism, the well‐known oriental philosophy, characterized by a dialectic thinking system. With sufficient evidence demonstrated, it argues that a Taoism‐oriented model of leadership offers a complementary lens, through which leadership insights can be deepened, and may serve as an effective tool for adaptive leaders in a world where change is the only constant.

Design/methodology/approach

Through an in‐depth analysis of the principles of Taoism, and the concepts of leadership studies, it establishes a Taoism‐oriented model of leadership to integrate the current major schools of leadership studies.

Findings

The model of traits of successful leaders based on Taoism has satisfactorily solved the conflicts between different perspectives of leadership studies and provided a dynamic framework to guide leaders to keep up with the organizational changes.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is only a rudimentary one that needs further exploration: for example, when external contexts of leadership are introduced, the current model would appear, in different patterns, to accommodate greater contextual complexities.

Practical implications

The model of traits of successful leaders based on Taoism will contribute to a greater understanding of an organization for different leadership styles. It will potentially serve as an effective tool for the selection of appropriate leaders for an organization and for building up an effective leadership team to accommodate the rapid changes of the organization.

Originality/value

This paper is an initial attempt to bridge leadership studies of east and west via the perspective of Taoism, which contributes to an integrating framework to accommodate different schools of leadership studies.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 30 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2011

Henri‐Claude de Bettignies, Po Keung Ip, Xuezhu Bai, André Habisch and Gilbert Lenssen

This paper aims to provide an overview of this special issue.

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1858

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an overview of this special issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The guest editorial introduces the papers in this special issue, focusing on practical wisdom for management from the Chinese classical traditions.

Findings

Chinese culture increasingly will permeate international culture and move from peripheral to mainstream status. To ignore this in management education would be a grave oversight.

Originality/value

The issue offers insights into the value of practical wisdom from Confucianism, the origins of Chinese classical trditions and Daoism, and the various streams of thought within the classical Chinese traditions and their contemporary relevance.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 30 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 19 July 2011

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547

Abstract

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 30 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 July 2011

Benoit Vermander

This article aims at showing that the relationship between Chinese classical wisdoms and managerial practices should not be reduced to the establishment of an “art of war”…

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1185

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims at showing that the relationship between Chinese classical wisdoms and managerial practices should not be reduced to the establishment of an “art of war” applicable to management practices, but should rather be understood as an ever‐evolving work of critical reinterpretation, so as to liberate the creative and strategic potential that this tradition embodies.

Design/methodology/approach

It does so by critically deconstructing the question of the “relevance” of Chinese wisdom for managerial practices, by assessing the way contemporary Sinology understands and interprets the concept of “Chinese wisdom”, and by designing a strategy for applying these insights to managerial education.

Findings

It thus shows that only historical contextualization and textual studies can ground an understanding of Chinese tradition applicable to managerial education.

Practical implications

By doing so, it helps educators to re‐anchor managerial education into the field and methodologies of humanities studies.

Originality/value

It thus goes against the utilitarian and over‐simplified syntheses of Chinese thought that are currently dominant in the managerial literature about China, and proposes new ways for making the study of China a channel through which to develop in our students a sense of relativity, complexity and empathy applicable to an array of cultural contexts.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 30 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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