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Article
Publication date: 31 July 2019

Xingping Jia, Shudi Liao, Beatrice I.J.M. Van der Heijden and Zhiwen Guo

This study in the hospitality industry aims to explore the underlying mechanisms through which socially responsible human resource management (SRHRM) affects frontline…

Abstract

Purpose

This study in the hospitality industry aims to explore the underlying mechanisms through which socially responsible human resource management (SRHRM) affects frontline employees’ knowledge sharing, as well as the moderating effects of role conflict and role ambiguity.

Design/methodology/approach

Two data waves have been collected from one of the largest restaurant chains in China. Using Mplus 7.0, a structural equation modeling model is empirically tested to investigate the hypothesized moderated mediation model.

Findings

First, SRHRM appears to foster frontline employees’ perceived respect and organizational trust and further stimulates their knowledge sharing. Second, role conflict is found to weaken the relationship between SRHRM and organizational trust, while role ambiguity seems to weaken the strength of the linkage between SRHRM and perceived respect.

Practical implications

Managers should make SRHRM policies more visible and implement appropriate SRHRM practices to facilitate employees proactively to share knowledge at work. Furthermore, managers should realize the dark side effects of role conflict and role ambiguity, as they might hinder the positive impact of SRHRM on knowledge sharing.

Originality/value

This study uncovers the meditating roles of perceived respect and organizational trust through which SRHRM impacts on employees’ knowledge sharing. By incorporating the possible moderating roles of role conflict and role ambiguity, this scholarly work also increases the understanding of possible hindrances in this regard.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2018

Hongyan Liu, Hao Xue, Yaojiang Shi and Scott Rozelle

Low levels of human capital in rural China are rooted in the poor schooling outcomes of elementary school students. The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into…

Abstract

Purpose

Low levels of human capital in rural China are rooted in the poor schooling outcomes of elementary school students. The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into the distribution of academic performance in rural China and identify vulnerable groups.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors draw on a data set of 25,892 observations constructed from 11 school-level surveys spanning nine provinces and one municipality in China conducted from 2013 to 2015.

Findings

The authors find that the distribution of academic performance is uneven across provinces and subgroups. In general, male students, Han, living in richer counties, living with their parents and studying in rural public schools do better academically than female students, non-Han, living in poorer counties, left behind and studying in private migrant schools in cities.

Research limitations/implications

Using the results of this study, policymakers should be able to better target investments into rural education focusing on at risk subpopulations.

Originality/value

With limited data sources, the research on the academic performance of students in rural China is largely absent. The findings of this study help to fill the gaps in the literature base.

Details

China Agricultural Economic Review, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-137X

Keywords

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