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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2021

Wendy R. Williams

English teachers who write have valuable expertise that can benefit students. Although there is a fair amount of research on teacher-writers, little is known about…

Abstract

Purpose

English teachers who write have valuable expertise that can benefit students. Although there is a fair amount of research on teacher-writers, little is known about teachers’ writing lives outside of educational or professional contexts. This paper aims to investigate the writing lives and teaching beliefs of five writing contest winners.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative study, which was guided by sociocultural theory and concepts such as literacy sponsorship, involved individual semi-structured interviews, questionnaires and writing and teaching artifacts.

Findings

Data analysis resulted in several themes describing participants’ writing lives: Writing Experiences, Writing Practices and Writing Attitudes. In addition, several themes emerged describing their teaching beliefs: Writing Assignments/Tools, Modeling and Credibility/Empathy/Vulnerability. Overlaps exist in the descriptions of their writing and teaching lives.

Practical implications

Teachers’ writing lives are valuable resources for instruction. It is recommended that teachers have opportunities to reflect on who they are as writers and what has shaped them. Teachers also need new experiences to expand their writing practices and strengthen their writing identities alongside fellow writers. More must be done to understand, nurture and sustain teachers’ writing.

Originality/value

This research expands the conversation on teachers as writers by involving writing contest winners, focusing on their writing lives and noticing how their writing experiences, practices and attitudes inform their teaching. This study suggests several ways to move forward in supporting teachers as writers, keeping in mind the social aspects of learning.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

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Article
Publication date: 2 June 2021

Marcos Ferasso

This paper aims to present a tool for helping the mindset organization of graduate students and early career researchers in the process of scientific papers writing. The…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a tool for helping the mindset organization of graduate students and early career researchers in the process of scientific papers writing. The canvas roadmap is proposed and summarizes the fundamental steps and main features of an academic paper in the business management field.

Design/methodology/approach

The adopted methodological procedures followed action research and focus groups precepts. Validation was applied in longitudinal and transversal procedures, with two early career researchers and with three groups of graduate students from different institutions. The validation procedures allowed the identification of 15 main features that were structured in a canvas format.

Findings

The conception of the canvas roadmap, influenced by the business model canvas, is a tool for easing researchers’ mindset when preparing a manuscript. Each of 15 features are explored according to main identified components along the paper writing process. Advices for early researchers are addressed, and key characteristics are presented. Further readings in academic writing literature are suggested as along with practical tips for developing the manuscript.

Research limitations/implications

Specifically, the canvas roadmap proposal intends to guide Iberoamerican/Latin American scholars to achieve their goals of publishing in top tier journals, relevant to their academic careers, and to improve research outcomes through a structured guidance for crafting scientific papers.

Originality/value

As main contribution and novelty, this paper intends to provide a canvas roadmap by identifying the main sections a scientific paper in the Business Management field must follow, and how to address specific features when writing these sections. This tool was conceived due the Business Management field needs a faster-to-address and easy-to-use tool and that summarizes main features of academic papers.

Propósito

Este artículo tiene como objetivo presentar una herramienta para ayudar a la organización de la mentalidad de los estudiantes de postgrados y los investigadores de carrera temprana en el proceso de redacción de artículos científicos. El mapa canvas es propuesto y resume los pasos fundamentales y las principales características de un artículo académico en el campo de la Gestión Empresarial.

Diseño/metodología/enfoque

Los procedimientos metodológicos adoptados siguieron los preceptos de la investigación-acción y los grupos focales. La validación se aplicó en procedimientos longitudinales y transversales, con dos investigadores en carrera inicial y con tres grupos de estudiantes de postgrados de diferentes instituciones. Los procedimientos de validación permitieron identificar quince características principales que se estructuraron en formato canvas.

Resultados

La concepción del mapa canvas, influenciada por el modelo canvas para los modelos de negocios, es una herramienta para facilitar la mentalidad de los investigadores al preparar un manuscrito. Cada una de las quince características se explora de acuerdo con los principales componentes identificados a lo largo del proceso de escritura de los manuscritos. Se abordan consejos para los investigadores tempranos y se presentan las características clave. Se sugieren lecturas adicionales de literatura académica, así como consejos prácticos para desarrollar el manuscrito.

Originalidad/valor

Como principal aporte y novedad, este artículo pretende proporcionar un mapa canvas identificando las principales secciones que debe seguir un artículo científico en el campo de la Gestión Empresarial y cómo abordar las características específicas al escribir estas secciones. Esta herramienta fue concebida debido al campo de la Gestión Empresarial necesitar una herramienta más rápida de abordar y fácil de usar y que resume las principales características de los artículos académicos.

Implicaciones de la investigación

Específicamente, la propuesta del mapa canvas pretende orientar a los académicos iberoamericanos/latinoamericanos para lograr sus objetivos de publicación en revistas de primer nivel, relevantes para sus carreras académicas, y mejorar los resultados de la investigación a través de una guía estructurada para la elaboración de artículos científicos.

Objetivo

Este artigo tem como objetivo apresentar uma ferramenta que ajude a organizar a mentalidade de alunos de pós-graduação e pesquisadores em início de carreira no processo de redação de artigos científicos. O mapa canvas é proposto e sintetiza as etapas fundamentais e as principais características de um artigo acadêmico da área de Administração e Negócios.

Desenho/metodologia/abordagem

Os procedimentos metodológicos adotados seguiram os preceitos da pesquisa-ação e dos grupos focais. A validação foi aplicada em procedimentos longitudinais e transversais, com dois pesquisadores em início de carreira e com três turmas de alunos de pós-graduação de instituições diferentes. Os procedimentos de validação permitiram identificar quinze características principais que foram estruturadas em formato canvas.

Resultados

A concepção do mapa canvas, influenciada pelo modelo de negócios canvas, é uma ferramenta para facilitar a mentalidade dos pesquisadores na preparação de um artigo. Cada uma das quinze características é explorada de acordo com os principais componentes identificados ao longo do processo de redação dos artigos. Abordam-se dicas para pesquisadores iniciantes e apresentam-se características principais. Sugere-se leitura adicional da literatura acadêmica, bem como dicas práticas para o desenvolvimento do artigo.

Originalidade/valor

Como principal contribuição e novidade, este artigo visa fornecer um mapa canvas identificando as principais seções que um artigo científico deve seguir na área de Administração e Negócios e como abordar as características específicas na redação destas seções. Essa ferramenta foi concebida devido à área de Administração e Negócios necessitar de uma ferramenta de abordagem mais rápida e fácil de usar e que sintetiza as principais características dos artigos acadêmicos.

Implicações da pesquisa

Especificamente, a proposta do mapa canvas visa orientar os acadêmicos ibero-americanos/latino-americanos a atingirem seus objetivos de publicação em periódicos de alto nível, relevantes para suas carreiras acadêmicas, e a melhorar os resultados da pesquisa por meio de um guia estruturado para a preparação de artigos científicos.

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Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Darolyn “Lyn” Jones

The Indiana Writers Center (IWC) believes that everyone has a unique story to tell. The mission of IWC is to nurture a diverse writing community, to support established…

Abstract

Abstract: Chapter Description

The Indiana Writers Center (IWC) believes that everyone has a unique story to tell. The mission of IWC is to nurture a diverse writing community, to support established and emerging writers, to improve written and verbal communication, and to cultivate an audience for literature in Indiana (About the Indiana Writers Center, 2012, para. 1).

For more than 30 years, the IWC, a nonprofit organization, has worked to foster a vibrant literary writing community in Indiana, providing education and enrichment opportunities for both beginning and accomplished writers. (About the Indiana Writers Center, 2012, para. 1).

Teacher, writer, and community activist Darolyn “Lyn” Jones was asked to join the staff at the IWC in 2005 to meet the new initiative: take writing out of the center and to marginalized writers. Her charge was to help writers both find and share their voice.

The origin of this initiative began with a group of girls, ages 12–22 in a maximum state prison. The girls became the Center’s muse and because of their words, the Center was compelled to build, create, and nurture even more youth writers. The backstory of the IWC work with the girls will be featured in this chapter.

The product of that early work has now evolved into Building a Rainbow, an eight-week long summer writing program designed to teach creative narrative nonfiction writing program to youth using a curriculum that helps them identify meaningful moments, see them in their mind’s eyes, and bring them alive on the page in vivid, compelling scenes.

Currently funded by the Summer Youth Program Fund (SYPF) in Indianapolis, the Building a Rainbow writing program is free to youth participants and held in various locations that serve a diverse student population. This chapter will highlight our work with four different community partners: our first group of youth, girls at a maximum state prison, and our current work with an all African-American youth development summer camp for students ages 6–18 run by the Indianapolis Fire Department, a Latino leadership institute that works with Latino students ages 11–16, and a south side, historic community center that works primarily with Caucasian students living in poverty.

By forging new collaborative relationships with arts organizations, schools and universities, community organizations and social service providers, IWC has worked successfully to

  • Create community with our writers and with partnering sites

  • Identify, sort, and prioritize program objectives (Caffarella, 2002, p. 21) in designing and delivering curriculum that meets the diverse needs of each site’s student group and meets our mission

  • Solicit and train instructors, university student interns, and community volunteers (Caffarella, 2002, p. 21)

  • Present, publish, and perform our work for the greater writing community.

Create community with our writers and with partnering sites

Identify, sort, and prioritize program objectives (Caffarella, 2002, p. 21) in designing and delivering curriculum that meets the diverse needs of each site’s student group and meets our mission

Solicit and train instructors, university student interns, and community volunteers (Caffarella, 2002, p. 21)

Present, publish, and perform our work for the greater writing community.

Besides learning about the programming above, readers can also read and hear the words and voices of students at the sites as they share their memoirs of people, places, and events that have shaped them.

Details

Living the Work: Promoting Social Justice and Equity Work in Schools around the World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-127-5

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Book part
Publication date: 20 September 2021

Sarah Jerasa

To be a writer, one must write. Research shows when teachers write and identify as writers, they transfer their writing practice into their classroom, positively impacting…

Abstract

To be a writer, one must write. Research shows when teachers write and identify as writers, they transfer their writing practice into their classroom, positively impacting their students' writing development. Shifting instructional practices or identities requires educators to self-determine a gap in order to take on transformative learning experiences, such as mentoring, professional development, or modeled learning. Often professional development is chosen by administrators for educators to shift their instructional practice, ignoring a teacher's curriculum-maker role, and best-loved self identity. This narrative inquiry analysis details one teacher-writer in a creative writing professional development residency as she supports educators with a goal to transform educators into teacher-writers. This chapter includes the small step successes and systematic struggles the author faced as she modeled the writer's craft and writer's workshop strategies with her teachers. The chapter concludes with a discussion on the important role teachers have to decide, navigate, and discover their own best-loved self-teaching identity.

Details

Developing Knowledge Communities through Partnerships for Literacy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-266-7

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Book part
Publication date: 15 November 2016

Sue Verlaan and Wolfram Verlaan

To describe how low-stakes writing can assist teachers in eliciting greater student engagement and involvement in their own writing by focusing the stages of the writing…

Abstract

Purpose

To describe how low-stakes writing can assist teachers in eliciting greater student engagement and involvement in their own writing by focusing the stages of the writing process more on student thinking than on the surface structure of their writing.

Design/methodology/approach

This chapter examines some of the important research literature addressing process writing in general and low-stakes writing in particular. The authors’ experiences with teaching English in the secondary classroom inform their analysis of implementing low-stakes writing assignments as part of the writing process.

Findings

The authors describe how using non-judgmental feedback on low-stakes writing assignments allows the teacher and students to have conversations on paper which are intended to help students explore, expand, and clarify their own thinking about a topic. By establishing a continuing conversation on paper with the students about their writing, the teacher takes on the role of “trusted ally” in the writing process, rather than the more traditional role of an arbiter of writing conventions.

Practical implications

Although the presumptive focus of writing instruction for the last two decades has been on the writing process, the tendency to turn the individual steps of the writing process into discrete writing products in a formulaic manner can cause many important parts of the writing process itself to be either overlooked or given short shrift. This chapter provides useful descriptions of ways in which low-stakes writing assignments can afford teachers the means by which to focus their students’ attention on key portions of the writing process so that their writing products are ultimately improved.

Details

Writing Instruction to Support Literacy Success
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-525-6

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Book part
Publication date: 25 June 2010

Daniele Besomi

Business cycle theory is normally described as having evolved out of a previous tradition of writers focusing exclusively on crises. In this account, the turning point is…

Abstract

Business cycle theory is normally described as having evolved out of a previous tradition of writers focusing exclusively on crises. In this account, the turning point is seen as residing in Clément Juglar's contribution on commercial crises and their periodicity. It is well known that the champion of this view is Schumpeter, who propagated it on several occasions. The same author, however, pointed to a number of other writers who, before and at the same time as Juglar, stressed one or another of the aspects for which Juglar is credited primacy, including the recognition of periodicity and the identification of endogenous elements enabling the recognition of crises as a self-generating phenomenon. There is indeed a vast literature, both primary and secondary, relating to the debates on crises and fluctuations around the middle of the nineteenth century, from which it is apparent that Juglar's book Des Crises Commerciales et de leur Retour Périodique en France, en Angleterre et aux États-Unis (originally published in 1862 and very much revised and enlarged in 1889) did not come out of the blue but was one of the products of an intellectual climate inducing the thinking of crises not as unrelated events but as part of a more complex phenomenon consisting of recurring crises related to the development of the commercial world – an interpretation corroborated by the almost regular occurrence of crises at about 10-year intervals.

Details

A Research Annual
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-060-6

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Book part
Publication date: 23 February 2016

Matthew Clair

Given the increasing use of social media and other digital technologies, critical theorists argue that social life has become increasingly structured by neoliberal market…

Abstract

Purpose

Given the increasing use of social media and other digital technologies, critical theorists argue that social life has become increasingly structured by neoliberal market logics. Little research has empirically tested these claims.

Methodology/approach

This study is the first to examine whether the use of digital technologies in the avant-garde literary field is accompanied by neoliberal logics. Developing a cultural logics approach to neoliberalism, which allows for the identification of the independent logics of entrepreneurship, market-faith, profit-maximization, efficiency, and individualism, I draw on archival data and interviews with editors and writers to explore the relationship between digital technologies and neoliberalism.

Findings

Editors and writers legitimate some neoliberal logics and reject others. Entrepreneurship and efficiency are strongly legitimated. Profit-maximization is generally rejected. Market-faith and individualism are legitimated differently by editors and writers who occupy different positions within the field, drawing attention to the importance of field position, organizational affiliation, and career exhaustion in the use of digital technologies in the avant-garde literary world. Many of these findings are surprising given the historically non-economic orientation of the field.

Research implications

Future research should explore neoliberal logics in other aspects of literary production and in other social domains.

Originality/value

This study provides a novel approach to the study of neoliberal logics as well as their relationship to digital technologies. Such an approach complements recent agendas in economic sociology and contributes to debates about the relationship between new technologies and capitalism.

Details

Communication and Information Technologies Annual
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-785-1

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Book part
Publication date: 20 September 2021

Tina Angelo and Maryann Gremillion

In this chapter, we describe our experiences creating and providing job-embedded professional development to teachers with an emphasis on creative writing. Our focus is on…

Abstract

In this chapter, we describe our experiences creating and providing job-embedded professional development to teachers with an emphasis on creative writing. Our focus is on the intersectionality of communities. We share narratives and scenarios from each of the communities – the participating teachers/administrators and the writing coaches collaborating with them. The program's objective is to empower teachers to see themselves as writers to become more effective teachers of writing. We discovered the unique nature of each campus community of teachers/writers and also found the need to provide a space and intentional structures to enable writing coaches to support each other. To measure our impact on teachers, we describe a qualitative evaluation process. Using the lens of two disruptive forces – a hurricane and a pandemic – we explore the implications for the future of the work. Each disruption brought inequities in education to the forefront of our thinking.

Details

Developing Knowledge Communities through Partnerships for Literacy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-266-7

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2020

Mary Juzwik and Sal Antonucci

Recently, practitioner literature in English education has taken up the issue of writing-related shame in classrooms, calling for teachers to help students develop…

Abstract

Purpose

Recently, practitioner literature in English education has taken up the issue of writing-related shame in classrooms, calling for teachers to help students develop resilience. One possible approach for nurturing shame resilience around writing is dialogic collaging: students make and dialogically engage with collages and with colleagues to explore the self-as-writer and to connect with others around writing struggles and joys. The purpose of this paper is to share and critically reflect on this pedagogical approach.

Design/methodology/approach

To share, interpret and consider the limitations and implications of the dialogic collaging pedagogy in service of writing-related shame resilience, the authors offer a multi-voiced narrative about one classroom instantiation of college, from the perspective of a university writing teacher and a student of writing.

Findings

On the interpretation, this story unfolds three central themes as follows: dialogic collaging can help students to develop a more realistic and situated sense of self-as-writer. That is, students can come to appreciate how “becoming a writer” is a process they – and others around them – are already in, rather than an unreachable achievement at which they will inevitably fail. The stance of playfulness nurtured through the dialogic collage process can provide a helpful distance between self and writing. These processes may – under certain conditions – support shame resilience.

Research limitations/implications

The conclusion reflects on whether more explicit attention to shame could be fruitful and on the dynamics of teacher vulnerability in writing classrooms.

Practical implications

The authors hope to inspire writing teachers – particularly in secondary, post-secondary and adult education – to engage with dialogic collaging as part of their pedagogical repertoires.

Originality/value

Dialogic collaging is a pedagogical approach not previously discussed in the literature on secondary and post-secondary writing instruction, offering one promising way to address writing-related shame. It can make visible and build solidarity around how others are also in the midst of a process of becoming – as writers and/or with writing. This appreciation can help nurture a more realistic, playful and shame-resilient stance toward self-as-writer.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1989

Stuart Hannabuss

The management of children′s literature is a search for value andsuitability. Effective policies in library and educational work arebased firmly on knowledge of materials…

Abstract

The management of children′s literature is a search for value and suitability. Effective policies in library and educational work are based firmly on knowledge of materials, and on the bibliographical and critical frame within which the materials appear and might best be selected. Boundaries, like those between quality and popular books, and between children′s and adult materials, present important challenges for selection, and implicit in this process are professional acumen and judgement. Yet also there are attitudes and systems of values, which can powerfully influence selection on grounds of morality and good taste. To guard against undue subjectivity, the knowledge frame should acknowledge the relevance of social and experiential context for all reading materials, how readers think as well as how they read, and what explicit and implicit agendas the authors have. The good professional takes all these factors on board.

Details

Library Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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