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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

Mark Stover and Steven D. Zink

The World Wide Web (WWW) has become the most visible application of the Internet. Newspapers and popular magazines publish stories on a regular basis about Web sites. The…

Abstract

The World Wide Web (WWW) has become the most visible application of the Internet. Newspapers and popular magazines publish stories on a regular basis about Web sites. The most ubiquitous symbols of the World Wide Web, its Uniform Resource Locator (URL) addresses, are even becoming commonplace on many television commercials. Over the past few years the World Wide Web (along with client applications like Netscape to assist in navigating the Web) has literally brought the Internet to life and to the attention of the general public.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1996

Helen C. Strain and Pauline M. Berry

The World Wide Web is an increasingly popular tool for accessing information via the Internet. It derives from many individuals and organisations making information…

182

Abstract

The World Wide Web is an increasingly popular tool for accessing information via the Internet. It derives from many individuals and organisations making information available using the medium of hypertext. The pages they create are sometimes wonderful, informative and entertaining but more often haphazard, confusing and difficult to navigate. Yet there exists a body of work and experience in the areas of hypertext design and human‐computer interaction (HCI) which should be influencing Web page design. This paper examines some of the main issues from these fields and how they apply to the Web. It proposes a set of guidelines for Web page design. Does your page satisfy these guidelines?

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Online and CD-Rom Review, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1353-2642

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Paul Nieuwenhuysen and Patrick Vanouplines

This guest editorial forms a brief introduction to an issue of The Electronic Library which focuses on libraries and the World Wide Web. To start with, the basics and…

Abstract

This guest editorial forms a brief introduction to an issue of The Electronic Library which focuses on libraries and the World Wide Web. To start with, the basics and state of the art of the World Wide Web are outlined in general. Then, the high and increasingly important impact of the Web on libraries is discussed.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Article
Publication date: 29 May 2009

Sameer Hinduja and Joseph A. Schafer

The purpose of this paper is to quantify the number of cybercrime units that are on the world wide web and the manner in which they represent themselves, and to clarify…

1879

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to quantify the number of cybercrime units that are on the world wide web and the manner in which they represent themselves, and to clarify how they are communicating information to their constituency (i.e. the visitors to their site) through new technology.

Design/methodology/approach

There is no sampling frame that serves as an exhaustive list of law enforcement departments with web sites, nor law enforcement departments with computer crime units, nor law enforcement departments with cybercrime unit web sites. As such, the world wide web was combed using popular search engines to find as many US‐based cybercrime unit web sites as possible. The final sample size was 88.

Findings

The findings suggest that though cybercrime units across the USA typically have similar missions (e.g. to respond to one or more forms of computer crime), they used their self‐representing web site in different ways. Beyond providing basic contact information and details about the cybercrime unit, web sites varied considerably in the depth and nature of their content. Units largely utilized these sites to simply exist on the world wide web. It was also unclear whether the sites actually fostered two‐way communication between agencies and their constituents. Sites also placed an emphasis on providing information that visitors might use to reduce their vulnerability to victimization through educational efforts.

Research limitations/implications

The sites in the sample all sought to inform their constituencies about the existence of the cybercrime unit they represent and the services they render, and to provide basic contact information. They seemingly differed, though, in the main intent and purpose of their site – which introduced variability in terms of the delivery of their content. Furthermore, disparities in available resources likely dictated the quality and depth of information presented on these sites.

Practical implications

This work assesses the current state of law enforcement information delivery over the world wide web, and also informs best practices in quality, depth, and comprehensiveness of that information delivery. This can then be used by law enforcement departments who have a cybercrime unit web site to improve its current state and fine‐tune communications and information dissemination efforts.

Originality/value

This is the first assessment of the world wide web presences of US law enforcement cybercrime units and contributes to the knowledgebase associated with agency communication with external entities.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Oliver Richardson

Many thousands of business related pages have been established on the World Wide Web (The Web) in the last five years. Some of the organisations that have published such…

Abstract

Many thousands of business related pages have been established on the World Wide Web (The Web) in the last five years. Some of the organisations that have published such pages have seen the Web as a medium of massive potential in the future. Despite this, actual direct sales from the web are still fairly low, especially amongst wine producers. A worldwide survey of vineyards with Web sites showed that there are many reasons for these low sales, including legal problems and transport of goods. However, the Vineyards appear confident that their investment will pay off, if not in direct sales then in terms of marketing benefit and cheap advertising. To date, the majority of vineyards questioned seem to be content. This paper discusses the main findings of the survey that produced these results.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 September 2008

Robin Hunt

This paper aims to explore some initial and necessarily broad ideas about the effects of the world wide web on our methods of understanding and trusting, online and off.

1560

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore some initial and necessarily broad ideas about the effects of the world wide web on our methods of understanding and trusting, online and off.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper considers the idea of trust via some of the revolutionary meanings inherent in the world wide web at its public conception in 1994, and some of its different meanings now. It does so in the context of the collaborative reader‐writer Web2.0 (of today), and also through a brief exploration of our relationship to the grand narratives (and some histories) of the post‐war West. It uses a variety of formal approaches taken from information science, literary criticism, philosophy, history, and journalism studies – together with some practical analysis based on 15 years as a web practitioner and content creator. It is a starting point.

Findings

This paper suggests that a pronounced effect of the world wide web is the further atomising of many once‐shared Western post‐war narratives, and the global democratising of doubt as a powerful though not necessarily helpful epistemological tool. The world wide web is the place that most actively demonstrates contemporary doubt.

Research limitations/implications

This is the starting place for a piece of larger cross‐faculty (and cross‐platform) research into the arena of trust and doubt. In particular, the relationship of concepts such as news, event, history and myth with the myriad content platforms of new media, the idea of the digital consumer, and the impact of geography on knowledge that is enshrined in the virtual. This paper attempts to frame a few of the initial issues inherent in the idea of “trust” in the digital age and argues that without some kind of shared aesthetics of narrative judgment brought about through a far broader public understanding of (rather than an interpretation of) oral, visual, literary and multi‐media narratives, stories and plots, we cannot be said to trust many types of knowledge – not just in philosophical terms but also in our daily actions and behaviours.

Originality/value

This paper initiates debate about whether the creation of a new academic “space” in which cross‐faculty collaborations into the nature of modern narrative (in terms of production and consumption; producers and consumers) might be able to help us to understand more of the social implications of the collaborative content produced for consumption on the world wide web.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 60 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1996

Kevin C. O'Kane

This paper describes the design and implementation of a system for computer generation of linked HTML documents to support information retrieval and hypertext applications…

Abstract

This paper describes the design and implementation of a system for computer generation of linked HTML documents to support information retrieval and hypertext applications on the World Wide Web. The approach is based on work by Salton and others, but extends the concept to be compatible with the World Wide Web browser environment by adding an interactive indexing technique that is well suited to the mouse‐based point‐and‐shoot input common to windowed browsers. The system does not require text query input, nor any client or host processing other than hypertext linkage. The goal of this work is to construct a fully automatic system in which original text documents are read and processed by a computer program that generates HTML files, which can be used immediately by Web browsers to search and retrieve the original documents. Thus, a user with a large collection of information — for instance, newspaper articles — can feed these documents to the program described here and produce directly, without further human intervention, the necessary files to establish World Wide Web home and related pages, to support interactive retrieval and distribution of the original documents.

Details

Online and CD-Rom Review, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1353-2642

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1995

Jonathan Furner‐Hines and Peter Willett

We have recently completed a survey of the use of hypertext systems in academic, public and special libraries within the United Kingdom. A questionnaire and both telephone…

Abstract

We have recently completed a survey of the use of hypertext systems in academic, public and special libraries within the United Kingdom. A questionnaire and both telephone and face‐to‐face interviews revealed that the largest application of such systems in academic libraries is the use of the WorldWide Web for networked document retrieval. This paper discusses the current usage of the WorldWide Web by academic library services, illustrating the range of facilities that libraries are starting to make available to their users.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 47 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

Alan Poulter

A ‘World Wide Web search engine’ is defined as a retrieval service, consisting of a database (or databases) describing mainly resources available on the World Wide Web

1104

Abstract

A ‘World Wide Web search engine’ is defined as a retrieval service, consisting of a database (or databases) describing mainly resources available on the World Wide Web (WWW), search software and a user interface also available via WWW. After intro ducing early Internet search engines, which are pertinent as precursors for the current range of WWW search engines, the problems of searching the WWW (link persistence, lack of integrated search software) and the resulting search engine types (keyword or directory) are analysed. Search engines of all types are then compared across their generic features (database content, retrieval software, and search interface), rather than on a search engine by search engine basis. Finally, wider information access issues aris ing from the nature of the Internet and web search engines are considered, and a general strategy for using web search engines is proposed.

Details

Program, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Georgios I. Zekos

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination…

65073

Abstract

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination of some legal aspects concerning MNEs, cyberspace and e‐commerce as the means of expression of the digital economy. The whole effort of the author is focused on the examination of various aspects of MNEs and their impact upon globalisation and vice versa and how and if we are moving towards a global digital economy.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 45 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Keywords

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