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Article

Aleece MacPhail, Carmel Young and Joseph Elias Ibrahim

The purpose of this paper is to reflect upon a workplace-based, interdisciplinary clinical leadership training programme (CLP) to increase willingness to take on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reflect upon a workplace-based, interdisciplinary clinical leadership training programme (CLP) to increase willingness to take on leadership roles in a large regional health-care centre in Victoria, Australia. Strengthening the leadership capacity of clinical staff is an advocated strategy for improving patient safety and quality of care. An interdisciplinary approach to leadership is increasingly emphasised in the literature; however, externally sourced training programmes are expensive and tend to target a single discipline.

Design/methodology/approach

Appraisal of the first two years of CLP using multiple sourced feedback. A structured survey questionnaire with closed-ended questions graded using a five-point Likert scale was completed by participants of the 2012 programme. Participants from the 2011 programme were followed up for 18 months after completion of the programme to identify the uptake of new leadership roles. A reflective session was also completed by a senior executive staff that supported the implementation of the programme.

Findings

Workplace-based CLP is a low-cost and multidisciplinary alternative to externally sourced leadership courses. The CLP significantly increased willingness to take on leadership roles. Most participants (93 per cent) reported that they were more willing to take on a leadership role within their team. Fewer were willing to lead at the level of department (79 per cent) or organisation (64 per cent). Five of the 11 participants from the 2011 programme had taken on a new leadership role 18 months later. Senior executive feedback was positive especially around the engagement and building of staff confidence. They considered that the CLP had sufficient merit to support continuation for at least another two years.

Originality/value

Integrating health-care professionals into formal and informal leadership roles is essential to implement organisational change as part of the drive to improve the safety and quality of care for patients and service users. This is the first interdisciplinary, workplace-based leadership programme to be described in the literature, and demonstrates that it is possible to deliver low-cost, sustainable and productive training that increases the willingness to take on leadership roles.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

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Article

Steven J. Agius, Amy Brockbank, Rebecca Baron, Saleem Farook and Jacky Hayden

The purpose of this paper is to determine the impact of an integrated Medical Leadership Programme (MLP) on a cohort of participating specialty doctors and the NHS…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the impact of an integrated Medical Leadership Programme (MLP) on a cohort of participating specialty doctors and the NHS services with which they were engaged.

Design/methodology/approach

This was a qualitative study designed to obtain rich textual data on a novel training intervention. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with participating MLP trainees at fixed points throughout the programme in order to capture their experiences. Resulting data were triangulated with data from extant documentation, including trainees’ progress reports and summaries of achievements. Recurring discourses and themes were identified using a framework thematic analysis.

Findings

Evidence of the positive impact upon trainees and NHS services was identified, along with challenges. Evidence of impact across all the domains within the national Medical Leadership Competency Framework was also identified, including demonstrating personal qualities, working with others, managing services, improving services and setting direction.

Research limitations/implications

Data were drawn from interviews with a small population of trainees undertaking a pilot MLP in a single deanery, so there are inevitable limitations for generalisability in the quantitative sense. Whilst the pilot trainees were a self-selected group, it was a group of mixed origin and ability.

Practical implications

The study has provided valuable lessons for the design of future leadership programmes aimed at doctors in training.

Originality/value

Identifying the effectiveness of an innovative model of delivery with regard to the Medical Leadership Curriculum may assist with medical staff engagement and support health service improvements to benefit patient care.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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Article

Matthew Gough and Lianne Kerlin

The Mental Capacity Act (MCA) was implemented in 2007 as a piece of legislation to empower and protect adults who require support making decisions. Many older adults in…

Abstract

Purpose

The Mental Capacity Act (MCA) was implemented in 2007 as a piece of legislation to empower and protect adults who require support making decisions. Many older adults in residential care homes will be in this position due to developmental disabilities associated with functional impairments of the mind and brain. This paper aims to evaluate the impact of MCA training within older persons' care homes within an East‐Midlands local authority.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi structured interviews were conducted with key informants who had strategic responsibility for implementation of MCA training as well as a focus group conducted with managers/deputy managers of care homes within the local authority.

Findings

With a primary focus on training, data revealed issues surrounding the delivery and content of training, and the organisational factors relating to both training and the subsequent implementation of the knowledge learned.

Research limitations/implications

The key informants for this paper are limited to management perspectives. Interviews and a focus group were conducted with stakeholders who either had direct responsibility for service delivery or managerial oversight for training and development.

Practical implications

The paper suggests methods of delivery with the Mental Capacity Act which offer a tailored, engaging and cost effective alternative to conventional “away day” training sessions.

Originality/value

The paper challenges and critiques conventional approaches to training the social care workforce.

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Article

Mats Lindell

This study aims to consider the complexities of planning and implementation of a reform in the Swedish system of higher vocational education and training (VET). The study…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to consider the complexities of planning and implementation of a reform in the Swedish system of higher vocational education and training (VET). The study object of this article is the Swedish reform with advanced vocational education (AVE). The two main questions the study aims to address are: “What are the main driving forces behind the formulation of AVE?” and “How is AVE implemented into the system of continuing vocational training?”.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is designed as a multiple case study, exploring different issues in the reform of AVE. These issues comprise organisation and structure, workplace learning and transition from AVE into working life. From a theoretical perspective, this study uses the analytical model of educational reform development by Lindensjö and Lundgren where reforms are perceived to take place at two different contexts in society.

Findings

The findings of this study suggest that with AVE a number of educational innovative features were introduced which generally had a positive impact. From the context of formulation, findings suggest that consensus among the central level stakeholders for how AVE should be designed was reached through the joint work of organising programmes during the three‐year pilot project, in combination with the concurrent restructuring of working life. From the context of realisation both educationalists and employers perceived the possibility of designing AVE programmes in co‐operation based on local level requirements as positive.

Research limitations/implications

To achieve demands for validity and trustworthiness, this study uses multiple sources of data gathering, applying data‐triangulation. Nonetheless, this study has some methodological limitations that need to be addressed. In terms of theoretical perspective, the analytical model could appear as simplifying the complex social processes that take place when reforms are being implemented in educational institutions and within working life.

Originality/value

This study provides evidence that developments in Swedish society and working life have together created conflicting demands among the stakeholders about how VET should be organised, the mode of delivery and relations towards the labour market.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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Article

Steve Iliffe and Jane Wilcock

The National Dementia Strategy is a challenge to commissioners of health and local government services to knit a thick pullover out of thin wool. The thick pullover is…

Abstract

The National Dementia Strategy is a challenge to commissioners of health and local government services to knit a thick pullover out of thin wool. The thick pullover is necessary because dementia is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that erodes the capacity of those affected by it, and absorbs increasing resources as it progresses. The thin wool is the limited evidence that investment in new kinds of services will produce benefits for people with dementia and their carers, while being affordable. This paper reviews the scale of the problem of dementia and its likely impact on services in the near future. It discusses some of the key recommendations of the National Dementia Strategy and explores debates about dementia advisors, economic modelling of innovative dementia services and the need for widespread training in the recognition of and response to dementia. Finally, it offers an approach to changing professional practice that is based on adult learning principles and workplace‐based reflective practice.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

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Article

Hannah Murray

The purpose of this paper is to identify two contrasting, yet successful, ways of conducting CPD training specific to the regeneration sector; looking at the different

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify two contrasting, yet successful, ways of conducting CPD training specific to the regeneration sector; looking at the different delivery methods of the two courses and the benefits associated with each.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides an overview and analysis of contrasting courses available through Coventry University and the University of Salford through literature and participants' experience.

Findings

For professionals in the regeneration sector traditional CPD courses from HE institutions are not the most effective. Regeneration covers a variety of different activities and is practically based; as a result flexible work based courses are more effective. Two contrasting examples of effective delivery methods are individual study based around existing projects and workplace based training to support tailored company development.

Originality/value

This paper will be of interest to regeneration professionals, managers and HR officers looking for effective ways to develop the workforce while maintaining business relevance. It looks at two new courses which take different approaches to work‐based CPD and discusses the differences and benefits of the two.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 41 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Teacher Preparation in Australia: History, Policy and Future Directions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-772-2

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Article

Suhail Al Bastaki, Washika Haak-Saheem and Tamer K. Darwish

The authors seek to explore the interplay between perceived training opportunities (PTOs) and knowledge sharing in the context of the emerging economic setting of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors seek to explore the interplay between perceived training opportunities (PTOs) and knowledge sharing in the context of the emerging economic setting of the United Arab Emirates. The authors also examined the moderating role of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation and engagement in social interaction on the relationship between PTOs and knowledge sharing.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed a survey method to collect the data and tested the proposed hypotheses by using the partial structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM) technique. Data is based on 815 responses across all sectors in the country context of the UAE.

Findings

The study findings indicate that PTOs are positively related to knowledge sharing. Notably, the results show that the proposed relationship between PTOs and knowledge sharing is negatively and significantly moderated by intrinsic motivation. Moreover, the moderating roles of extrinsic motivation and engagement in social interaction were insignificant.

Originality/value

At a theoretical level, this article provides an individual-level analysis, which indicates that PTOs pave the way for intraorganizational knowledge sharing; hence, they offer insights into the mechanisms in which PTOs impact on knowledge sharing. This article also contributes to our general understanding on human resource management (HRM) practices and knowledge sharing in the context of the emerging economy of the UAE; the latter has a number of implications for both theory and practice as delineated in this study.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 42 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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Article

Antonios Panagiotakopoulos

The purpose of this study is to explore small firm owners' perceptions of the impact of employee training on small firm competitiveness in the context of Greece.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore small firm owners' perceptions of the impact of employee training on small firm competitiveness in the context of Greece.

Design/methodology/approach

The research adopts a qualitative orientation. Empirical data were collected from 43 owners of small and micro‐firms operating in various sectors of the Greek manufacturing industry through personal semi‐structured interviews.

Findings

The empirical evidence reveals that informal staff training can help Greek small firms face the challenges of the future. More specifically, the interview findings indicated that workplace training can: reduce employee errors in the production process; help small firms to meet skill shortage needs; facilitate the introduction of new technology; and enhance worker employability.

Practical implications

The paper argues that a key challenge for policy makers and employers in this area is to facilitate informal learning within small firms in order to improve firm performance. In the same manner, work‐integrated learning (WIL) seems to have a vital role to play in the performance of Greek small enterprises since WIL programs have the potential to address skills mismatch issues.

Originality/value

The study brings new insights around the benefits of informal staff training and work‐integrated learning for small and micro‐firm performance in the context of a small European country like Greece, where there has been scant research and very limited understanding.

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Article

Erica Smith, Andrew Smith and Chris Selby Smith

This paper aims to examine the employment and training of mature‐aged workers, so that suggestions for improving training for mature‐aged workers may be offered.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the employment and training of mature‐aged workers, so that suggestions for improving training for mature‐aged workers may be offered.

Design/methodology/approach

Six expert interviews were carried out by telephone, and three case studies involving company site visits were completed. Each company case study involved interviews with managers, trainers and mature‐aged workers. The study was confined to the manufacturing industry.

Findings

Mature‐aged workers bring many advantages to workplaces and some employers show a definite preference for them over younger workers; but in some cases training needs to take account of lack of confidence and literacy and health issues. However, there is great diversity among mature‐aged workers.

Research limitations/implications

The research is confined to shop‐floor workers in manufacturing, and does not address training of mature‐aged managers and professionals. The research is small‐scale but provides new insights, and importantly the voices of the workers themselves.

Practical implications

The paper identifies managerial and training practices that can immediately be implemented.

Originality/value

The paper identifies some issues that can be taken up at a policy level as well as within companies. For example, the preference for qualification‐based training at a national level is not necessarily consistent with what mature‐aged workers prefer.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

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