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Article

Frank Pot

The purpose of this paper is to describe the need for workplace innovation policies and practices in Europe and evaluate programs that already have been developed.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the need for workplace innovation policies and practices in Europe and evaluate programs that already have been developed.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes the concept of workplace innovation and trends in society explaining its emergence. The paper then presents and discusses the results of evaluation research as far as this is available.

Findings

A growing number of countries is conducting or developing some kind of programme on workplace innovation. These programmes differ in size and governance. Evaluation research shows that simultaneous improvement of performance and quality of working life is possible under certain conditions such as the participation of employees in change projects.

Research limitations/implications

Concepts and designs of evaluation research projects differ considerably. This gives new challenges for companies, trade unions, governments and researchers. In EU2020, little attention is paid to workplace innovation but there is a ray of hope in the draft integrated guidelines for employment policies and in the Flagship Initiative Innovation Union.

Originality/value

Social innovation in the workplace, or workplace innovation, is a new concept, covering to some extent new practices that appear to be relevant for organisations and governments.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 60 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

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Article

Stephanie Foust, Nancy L. Cassill and David Herr

This study examined the casual workplace in the context of diffusion of innovation. The innovation of the casual workplace, the wearing of casual clothing to the office…

Abstract

This study examined the casual workplace in the context of diffusion of innovation. The innovation of the casual workplace, the wearing of casual clothing to the office, has had positive effects on most aspects of the corporate culture. Rogers' model of innovation‐decision process (1995) provided the conceptual framework for this study. Questionnaires were sent to human resource executives of US Fortune 500 companies, with 189 executives responding to the mailed survey. Respondents were categorised into one of Rogers’ (1995) adopter categories. Chi‐square goodness‐of‐fit test, chi‐square analysis and analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to test H1, H2 and H3 respectively. The percentages of the companies that are categorised in each of four adopter categories in this study differed from the percentages in each of five adopter categories in Rogers' (1995) model. Human resource executives’ cognisance of the casual workplace differed on two knowledge components and two casual workplace persuasion components, relative advantage and compatibility. Because the number of Fortune 500 companies adopting casual workplace attire appears to be increasing, the need for this attire continues. Therefore, textile marketers, dry‐cleaners and retailers are challenged to provide products and services to meet consumers' casual workplace apparel needs.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Content available
Article

Iryna Prus, Raoul C.D. Nacamulli and Alessandra Lazazzara

The purpose of this paper is to consolidate the state of extant academic research on workplace innovation (WI) by proposing a comprehensive conceptual framework and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consolidate the state of extant academic research on workplace innovation (WI) by proposing a comprehensive conceptual framework and outlining research traditions on the phenomenon.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper systematically reviewed the literature published over the past 20 years, basing on a predefined research protocol. The dimensions of WI were explored with the help of thematic synthesis, while the research perspectives were studied by means of textual narrative synthesis.

Findings

The analysis suggests that there exist four research traditions on WI – built container, humanized landscape, socio-material macro-actor, and polyadic network – and each of them comprises its own set of assumptions, foci of study, and ontological bases. The findings suggest that WI is a heterogeneous process of renovation occurring in eight different dimensions, namely work system, workplace democracy, high-tech application, workplace boundaries, workspaces, people practices, workplace experience, and workplace culture. The analysis showed that over years the meaning of innovation within these dimensions changed, therefore it is argued that research should account for the variability of these categories.

Practical implications

The paper includes implications for developing and implementing WI programs. Moreover, it discusses the role of HR in the WI process.

Originality/value

This paper for the first time systematically reviews literature on the topic of WI, clarifies the concept and discusses directions and implications for the future research.

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Article

Warit Wipulanusat, Kriengsak Panuwatwanich and Rodney Anthony Stewart

The purpose of this paper is to study the influence of two climates for innovation constructs, namely, leadership and organisational culture, on workplace innovation and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the influence of two climates for innovation constructs, namely, leadership and organisational culture, on workplace innovation and career satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used structural equation modelling to test the data from 3,125 engineering professionals in the Australian Public Service (APS).

Findings

The structural model indicated that leadership for innovation and ambidextrous culture for innovation influenced workplace innovation which, in turn, improved career satisfaction. Moreover, modelling revealed a significant relationship between ambidextrous culture for innovation and career satisfaction. This study also investigated mediation effects and revealed both simple and sequential mediation paths in the model. It was found that improving workplace innovation and career satisfaction through recognition of an engineer’s contribution to their agency would assist in retaining and advancing in-house engineering expertise.

Practical implications

The structural model could be used to address current shortages of engineering professionals in the Commonwealth of Australia departments. The findings emphasise the importance of Commonwealth departments providing opportunities for their engineers to engage in creative and innovative projects which enhance their professional career.

Originality/value

This study fills the gap in the innovation literature by exploring the relationships through which socio-psychological factors affect workplace innovation and career satisfaction on the innovation process for engineering professionals in the APS.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

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Article

Lurdes Simao and Mário Franco

This paper aims to analyse the impact of different knowledge sources used by firms to adopt organizational innovation, in relation to organization of responsibilities and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyse the impact of different knowledge sources used by firms to adopt organizational innovation, in relation to organization of responsibilities and decision-making in the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

To fulfil the proposed objective, quantitative research, based on a sample of 2,591 Portuguese firms, has been undertaken. Data have been obtained from the Community Innovation Survey 2012.

Findings

The results show the importance of external knowledge from suppliers, clients, consultants and commercial laboratories in new innovation practices in firm workplace. Knowledge from competitors, universities, the State and research institutes does not present a significant effect.

Practical implications

Knowledge sources can stimulate the introduction of new management practices in the workplace, consistent with the external search literature on technological innovation, which argues that many of the ideas and implementation skills for organizational innovation come from outside sources.

Originality/value

Within the innovation management literature, very few studies tried to explore organizational innovation in firm workplaces. This paper is innovative and makes a novel contribution mainly to the knowledge management field by highlighting the importance of external knowledge sources in organizational innovation in firm workplaces from a knowledge-based perspective.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Article

Koustab Ghosh

The purpose of this study was to empirically examine the impact of self leadership on employee creativity and workplace innovative orientation moderated by the creativity…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to empirically examine the impact of self leadership on employee creativity and workplace innovative orientation moderated by the creativity climate of the organization.

Design/methodology/approach

This study as a unique approach has explored the dimension of self-leadership in connection with employee creativity,creativity climate and workplace innovation preparedness.

Findings

The results of structural equation modelling analysis based on the sample responses obtained from the research,design and development units of a select number of organizations across industries in the Indian context revealed the significant relationships among self-leadership,employee creativity,creativity climate and workplace innovative orientation. Further,the moderating effect of creativity climate was conducted using post hoc on employee creativity and workplace innovative orientation.

Research limitations/implications

The major limitation of the study lies in relatively small sample size compared to large population group,inference of causality on cross-sectional data and absence of any qualitative analysis through the interaction with sample respondents.

Originality/value

Although the findings from this study are limited to the scope of a small number of surveyed organizations compared to the large population,it brings out interesting insights in Indian context for future researches in this direction,especially for exploring the linkages among self-leadership,creativity and innovation.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 38 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

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Article

Peter Totterdill and Rosemary Exton

This article aims to demonstrate that trade unions possess unique knowledge of how organisations really work and that they are repositories of experience embracing many…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to demonstrate that trade unions possess unique knowledge of how organisations really work and that they are repositories of experience embracing many different situations and stretching over many years. Closing the gap between best practice and common practice needs knowledgeable advocates to actively demonstrate what workplace innovation is and how it benefits organisations and individuals.

Design/methodology/approach

This article demonstrates that trade unions possess unique knowledge of how organisations really work and that they are repositories of experience embracing many different situations and stretching over many years. Yet, this experience and understanding is often an underused resource in workplaces.

Findings

At the frontline, union representatives can release their members’ tacit knowledge and ideas for improvement and innovation. At strategic level, unions can deliver robust advice and consultancy, securing trust from employees and employers alike. Actively involving unions in dialogue about challenges and opportunities is the key to unlocking this potential.

Practical implications

The paper draws upon examples of collaborative working and the role of unions from the USA, Ireland and Norway, while a more detailed analysis of the “Danish Experience” demonstrates how Ideas, high levels of knowledge and strong relationships between unions and employers able to handle both shared and conflicting interests, impacts on trade unions ability to “stimulate, resource and sustain workplace innovation”.

Originality/value

The paper concludes with a call to action showing how a mass movement of workplace innovation can be achieved through shared learning case studies and resources and from the creation of the European Workplace Innovation Network Knowledge Bank to help people to share their knowledge and experience.

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Article

John McCartney and Paul Teague

This paper reviews a number of studies that has examined the use of workplace innovations in the Republic of Ireland. It is argued that despite having quite different…

Abstract

This paper reviews a number of studies that has examined the use of workplace innovations in the Republic of Ireland. It is argued that despite having quite different sampling and technical properties, the surveys reach similar findings on many matters – the high degree of experimentation with innovative work practices, and the piecemeal nature of workplace reform in most companies for example. Yet disagreement has occurred about how these findings should be interpreted. One view is sceptical about whether the surveys point to meaningful innovations in enterprise level employment systems in Ireland. A less pessimistic perspective suggests that the high level of experimentation occurring on new employment practices should be seen as significant as most organisations adopt an evolutionary approach to workplace reform.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Content available
Article

Greg J. Bamber, Timothy Bartram and Pauline Stanton

The purpose of this paper is to review the roles of human resource management (HRM) specialists in the contemplation and implementation of innovation in employing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the roles of human resource management (HRM) specialists in the contemplation and implementation of innovation in employing organisations and workplaces.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors review some of the literature and practice in this field as well as 11 other articles that are included in this special issue.

Findings

The authors propose six research questions. First, are HRM specialists analysing relevant trends and their implications for the future of work and the workforce? Second, are HRM specialists enabling employing organisations to identify and enable innovative ideas? Third, to what extent are HRM specialists leading partnership arrangements with organised labour? Fourth, what is the role of HRM specialists in creating inclusive work environments? Fifth, how should HRM specialists change to foster enterprise performance, intrapreneurship, agility, creativity and innovation? Sixth, to what extent is there an HRM function for line managers in coordination with HRM specialists in engendering innovation around “change agent” roles?

Originality/value

The authors argue that HRM specialists should embrace and enable innovation. The authors challenge HRM specialists to consider how they can contribute to facilitating innovation. The paper proposes further research on HRM and range of associated stakeholders who, together, have responsibility for innovating in the design and delivery of HRM to enrich our knowledge of HRM and workplace innovations.

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Article

Paul Vos and Theo van der Voordt

Many organisations have changed to new ways of working, steered or followed up by design interventions and sharing of activity related workplaces. Expectations have been…

Abstract

Many organisations have changed to new ways of working, steered or followed up by design interventions and sharing of activity related workplaces. Expectations have been high. Innovative offices should lead to more efficient use of space and other facilities; greater job satisfaction; the projection of a positive image to clients; an improved performance of the organisation and its staff; and reduced costs. Have innovations in the working environment fulfilled these high expectations? Are the new offices really more efficient and more pleasant to work in? Or will constant changing of the workplace reduce satisfaction and productivity? What are the ‘pros’ and ‘cons’ of teleworking? Are the extra costs of nice ergonomic furniture, high‐tech information and communication technology (ICT) and image‐boosting gadgets counterbalanced by the expected profits in higher productivity and more efficient use of space? Evaluative research results show a mixed picture. Besides the considerable satisfaction with the attractive design and the improved opportunities to interact, there are many complaints about problems in concentrating on work. Psychological mechanisms, such as the need for status, privacy and individual territory, do not necessarily hinder ‘flexi‐working’, but only when the new situation provides considerable added value. Teleworking offers more freedom of choice, but there are attendant risks.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

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