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Article
Publication date: 29 March 2011

Michael Sheehan and John Griffiths

The purpose of this paper is to extend awareness that workplace bullying impacts on the health of individuals both within and outside the workplace and that there are…

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3832

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to extend awareness that workplace bullying impacts on the health of individuals both within and outside the workplace and that there are implications for workplace health management.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper contextualises the problem of workplace bullying and workplace health management and introduces the five articles in the special issue.

Findings

Workplace health management is becoming more prominent in some organizations and workplace health management, and a corporate culture based on partnership, trust and respect, offers considerable potential to move the agenda forward. Moreover, there appears to be a paucity of knowledge available as to how workplace health management strategies and programmes impact on organizational culture and assembling and sharing such a knowledge base could be a useful step.

Research limitations/implications

Further research is required to extend the studies presented and to address workplace bullying from the perspective of workplace health management.

Practical implications

Research is required to explore the extent to which the potential of workplace health management programmes to impact positively on corporate approaches to bullying and harassment has been realised and how those programmes have influenced corporate culture.

Social implications

A partnership approach to knowledge creation and sharing has the most potential for successful outcomes and accords closely with the inferred ideals of the Luxembourg Declaration for Workplace Health promotion.

Originality/value

The paper addresses a perceived gap in the literature linking workplace bullying to the impact on individual health and the implications for workplace health management.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article
Publication date: 26 March 2020

Yvonne Lagrosen and Stefan Lagrosen

The purpose of this paper is to examine gender differences regarding the experience of workplace health and quality management. In this context, we include some factors of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine gender differences regarding the experience of workplace health and quality management. In this context, we include some factors of work environment that have previously been shown to be related to health such as workplace learning, stress, flow and sense of coherence.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire based on previous research was constructed. It was delivered to a population of Swedish upper secondary school teachers. Three hundred eleven responses were returned. They were analysed for gender differences with t-tests and chi-square tests.

Findings

The results show that women's experience of their health is worse than men's despite having a generally better experience of the quality management values, workplace learning and flow. Moreover, women experience more stress, and they are more often subjected to sexual harassment while men more frequently had been exposed to physical violence.

Research limitations/implications

The study has implications for research in that it indicates that although women have better experiences of many of the factors that previous research has shown to be related to workplace health, their health is actually worse. A limitation is that the response rate was low.

Practical implications

The findings should be useful for managers attempting to improve the workplace health of their staff. The finding that women report less health than men even though experiencing quality management values more, means that women's health need a particular focus in secondary schools.

Originality/value

The connection between health and quality management has not been previously studied from a gender perspective.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2021

Sally Hemming, Hilary McDermott, Fehmidah Munir and Kim Burton

Long-term health conditions are a significant occupational and global burden and can undermine people's ability to work. Workplace support for self-management of long-term…

Abstract

Purpose

Long-term health conditions are a significant occupational and global burden and can undermine people's ability to work. Workplace support for self-management of long-term conditions has the potential to minimise adverse work effects, by enhancing health and work outcomes. No data exist about employers' views concerning supporting workers with long-term conditions to self-manage.

Design/methodology/approach

The exploration of employers' views involved recruiting 15 participants with responsibilities for workplace health, well-being and safety responsibilities, who participated in a semi-structured interview about self-management and support. Data were analysed using a qualitative six-stage thematic analysis technique.

Findings

Self-management support is not purposely provided to workers with long-term conditions. Support in any form rests on workers disclosing a condition and on their relationship with their line-manager. While employers have considerable control over people's ability to self-manage, they consider that workers are responsible for self-management at work. Stigma, work demands and line-manager behaviours are potential obstacles to workers' self-management and support.

Practical implications

Workplace discussions about self-managing long-term conditions at work should be encouraged and opened up, to improve health and work outcomes and aligned with return-to-work and rehabilitation approaches. A wider biopsychosocial culture could help ensure workplaces are regarded as settings in which long-term conditions can be self-managed.

Originality/value

This study highlights that employer self-management support is not provided to workers with long-term conditions in a purposeful way. Workplace support depends on an employer knowing what needs to be supported which, in turn, depends on aspects of disclosure, stigma, work demands and line management.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2017

Sharlene Chadwick and Joanne Travaglia

During the past decade, there has been increased attention into bullying behaviours in workplaces. Research to date has varied in design, the definition of what…

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1493

Abstract

Purpose

During the past decade, there has been increased attention into bullying behaviours in workplaces. Research to date has varied in design, the definition of what constitutes bullying behaviour, as well as the methods used to collect data and measure bullying incidence and prevalence. Nonetheless, studies demonstrate that bullying is a significant issue, which warrants an increased research focus to develop greater understanding of the concept, its effects and implications in, and for, the workplace. The purpose of this paper is to focus on capturing a range of international and Australian literature regarding workplace bullying behaviours in a health context from a management perspective. As a result, this paper identified the gaps in the literature when expanded specifically to an Australian health context.

Design/methodology/approach

The purpose of this review is to summarise the existing literature, both internationally and in Australia which examines workplace bullying behaviours in a health context from a management perspective. This describes the review of the literature on workplace bullying in a health context undertaken from January to April 2014. The “Preferred Reporting Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses” method was used to structure the review, which covered a wide range of literature from databases including MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL and InformIT, as well as reports, and grey literature.

Findings

The review included 62 studies that met the inclusion criteria and reported either: factors contributing to workplace bullying, at least one significant example of workplace bullying behaviour or the impact of workplace bullying behaviours in a health context.

Originality/value

There is limited data on workplace bullying behaviours in an Australian health context. The literature supports there is value in future research to develop consistent definitions, policies, procedures and frameworks, which could help to prevent or address workplace bullying behaviours based on work being undertaken internationally.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Virginia Dickson-Swift, Christopher Fox, Karen Marshall, Nicky Welch and Jon Willis

Factors for successful workplace health promotion (WHP) are well described in the literature, but often sourced from evaluations of wellness programmes. Less well…

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7485

Abstract

Purpose

Factors for successful workplace health promotion (WHP) are well described in the literature, but often sourced from evaluations of wellness programmes. Less well understood are the features of an organisation that contribute to employee health which are not part of a health promotion programme. The purpose of this paper is to inform policy on best practice principles and provide real life examples of health promotion in regional Victorian workplaces.

Design/methodology/approach

Individual case studies were conducted on three organisations, each with a health and wellbeing programme in place. In total, 42 employers and employees participated in a face to face interview. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and the qualitative data were thematically coded.

Findings

Employers and senior management had a greater focus on occupational health and safety than employees, who felt that mental/emotional health and happiness were the areas most benefited by a health promoting workplace. An organisational culture which supported the psychosocial needs of the employees emerged as a significant factor in employee's overall wellbeing. Respectful personal relationships, flexible work, supportive management and good communication were some of the key factors identified as creating a health promoting working environment.

Practical implications

Currently in Australia, the main focus of WHP programmes is physical health. Government workplace health policy and funding must expand to include psychosocial factors. Employers will require assistance to understand the benefits to their business of creating environments which support employee's mental and emotional health.

Originality/value

This study took a qualitative approach to an area dominated by quantitative biomedical programme evaluations. It revealed new information about what employees really feel is impacting their health at work.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Kate Daisy Bone

The purpose of this paper is to exemplify how the bioecological model (BM) may be used as a systems approach framework to address workplace well-being in a holistic…

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4294

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to exemplify how the bioecological model (BM) may be used as a systems approach framework to address workplace well-being in a holistic, meaningful and practical way.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper is structured according to the design of Bronfenbrenner’s (1999) BM. As such, the different layers of the model are described and then examples from the recent international and interdisciplinary literature and current policy from Australia are provided to support the argument. These selected examples represent some key themes in the field of workplace health and well-being management.

Findings

The BM is ideal in holistically analysing workplace health promotion and management. This finding supports future research using this model. The limitations of the model are that it can lend itself to research projects that are unfocused. It is suggested that determining the research aims and objectives and then using the model to respond to this agenda would use the model effectively.

Research limitations/implications

This paper proposes the applicability of a specific model to a research agenda suggesting that interested parties could design a project around this model to investigate workplace health and well-being management.

Practical implications

The model gives weight to the lived experiences of employees and suggests that business owners and policy makers hold power in controlling aspects that influence employee well-being. This model could be used to inform policy makers about the holistic nature of employee well-being urging inclusive policies that support positive well-being practices.

Originality/value

This paper provides a unique contribution to the field by offering a topic-specific model useful to those concerned with workplace health and well-being management.

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Bodil J. Landstad, Marianne Hedlund and Stig Vinberg

Small-scale enterprises (SSEs) are important for sustainable development in Europe and account for a significant proportion of private enterprises and their large…

Abstract

Purpose

Small-scale enterprises (SSEs) are important for sustainable development in Europe and account for a significant proportion of private enterprises and their large contribution to employment. The purpose of this paper is to explore workplace health management (WHM) from the perspective of managers in SSEs in Norway and Sweden.

Design/methodology/approach

In-depth interviews with 18 managers in SSEs were conducted and a stepwise qualitative analysis was used.

Findings

The findings are presented as two main patterns: inter-organisational dynamics and participative leadership. Managers discussed opportunities for WHM to foster solidarity and flexibility in the workplace, the potential of employees for self-governance and a cultural environment at the workplace characterized by safety, trust, care, loyalty and humour. The managers employed a process-oriented communicator style, were all-rounders, and demonstrated dedicated and distinct management. Managers in SSEs were lone problem solvers and experienced high and conflicting work demands and work-family conflicts.

Research limitations/implications

The findings should be interpreted with caution concerning representation of SSEs generally. The enterprises were recruited from an intervention project focussing on WHM and might, therefore, have a positive attitude.

Practical implications

The managers obtain recommended information about what to do and how to address WHM in SSEs.

Originality/value

This study adds important knowledge regarding the preconditions for creating health promoting workplaces in SSEs, an area for which limited research exists. The findings provide insights and knowledge about managers’ possibilities and obstacles in WHM. The findings could be transferrable to management in similar contexts if managers develop more awareness and knowledge.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2010

Gerard I.J.M. Zwetsloot, Arjella R. van Scheppingen, Anja J. Dijkman, Judith Heinrich and Heleen den Besten

A healthy and vital workforce is an asset to any organization. Workplace health management and health promotion are therefore increasingly relevant for organizations. This…

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5959

Abstract

Purpose

A healthy and vital workforce is an asset to any organization. Workplace health management and health promotion are therefore increasingly relevant for organizations. This paper aims to identify the organizational benefits companies strive for, and analyzes the ways companies use and manage data in order to monitor, evaluate and improve the achievement of organizational benefits through workplace health management.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study was carried out in four frontrunner organizations in health management in The Netherlands. The benefits the companies strived for were systematically investigated, as were the ways in which the companies used and managed their relevant data.

Findings

The organizations had many data that were potentially useful for managing and evaluating the realization of the intended health and business benefits. However, these data were only available and usable in a fragmented manner. As a result, the business impact of health interventions was neither properly evaluated nor consistently managed.

Research limitations/implications

The research was limited to four frontrunner companies in The Netherlands. The results presented are predominantly qualitative.

Practical implications

Suggestions for improving the management of organizational benefits from workplace health interventions are given here; they were formulated though an iterative process with the companies involved.

Originality/value

Research on the combination of health and business benefits of workplace health management has been rather limited thus far. The present paper provides a complete picture of the benefits strived for by four Dutch frontrunner organizations, as well as the data available to them, which are or could be used for guiding and improving workplace health management.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Jenny Barber, Sarah E Hillier, Geoff Middleton, Richard Keegan, Hannah Henderson and Jacquie Lavin

– The purpose of this paper is to assess the feasibility and benefits of providing weight management support via the workplace.

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2685

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the feasibility and benefits of providing weight management support via the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

Quasi-experimental design using non-random assignment to a 12-week Slimming World (SW) weight management programme, either within the workplace or at a regular community group. Weight was recorded weekly and a 39-item questionnaire focused on mental and emotional health, self-esteem, dietary habits and physical activity habits administered at baseline, 12 weeks, six and 12 months.

Findings

In total, 243 participants enroled (workplace n=129, community n=114) with 138 completers (defined as those weighing-in at baseline and attending at least once within the last four weeks; workplace n=76, community n=62). Completers reported a mean weight change of −4.9 kg±3.4 or −5.7 per cent±3.8. Mental and emotional health scores increased (p < 0.05) from baseline to 12 weeks. Self-worth scores increased (p < 0.05) from baseline to 12 weeks, six and 12 months. Healthy dietary habit scores increased and unhealthy dietary habit scores decreased (p < 0.05) from baseline to 12 weeks, six and 12 months. Healthy physical activity habit scores improved (p < 0.05) from baseline to 12 weeks and six months. There were no significant differences between groups.

Research limitations/implications

Participant demographic was predominantly female (94 per cent) aged 42.3 years, with only 13 men participating.

Practical implications

The results support the use of a 12-week SW weight management programme as a credible option for employers wanting to support staff to achieve weight loss and improve psycho-social health outcomes which could lead to improvements in quality of life and work performance.

Originality/value

Provides evidence for the delivery of weight management support via the workplace.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article
Publication date: 27 June 2008

Wolf Kirsten

This paper aims to provide an overview of the major health‐related challenges facing the European workplace and a summary of emerging research in the workplace health

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3096

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an overview of the major health‐related challenges facing the European workplace and a summary of emerging research in the workplace health management field. Specific health and productivity strategies and outcome variables are also discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

Numerous current resources were used in order to craft a comprehensive overview: European Union and World Health Organization statistics, surveys and research briefs, research studies, technical reports, political briefs and green papers, scientific theories and models, internal corporate reports and personal interviews.

Findings

While a growing number of studies and programs are addressing the mounting workplace health challenges in Europe, only a small number of initiatives are systematic and evaluated. The case for enhanced data collection and integrated programs targeting lifestyles as well as the psychosocial working environment with productivity as an outcome variable is made. Two key strengths of the field in Europe are a salutogenic approach focusing on health potential and the social capital concept.

Originality/value

The paper provides a unique interdisciplinary perspective and a current review of health and productivity management in Europe.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

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