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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Jonathan C. Morris

Looks at the 2000 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference held at the University of Cardiff in Wales on 6/7 September 2000. Spotlights the 76 or so presentations within…

Abstract

Looks at the 2000 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference held at the University of Cardiff in Wales on 6/7 September 2000. Spotlights the 76 or so presentations within and shows that these are in many, differing, areas across management research from: retail finance; precarious jobs and decisions; methodological lessons from feminism; call centre experience and disability discrimination. These and all points east and west are covered and laid out in a simple, abstract style, including, where applicable, references, endnotes and bibliography in an easy‐to‐follow manner. Summarizes each paper and also gives conclusions where needed, in a comfortable modern format.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 23 no. 9/10/11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

Abstract

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The Creation and Analysis of Employer-Employee Matched Data
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44450-256-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Paul J. Gollan

This research aims to examine non‐union and union representative arrangements at the Eurotunnel call centre and assesses their effectiveness in representing the needs of employees.

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to examine non‐union and union representative arrangements at the Eurotunnel call centre and assesses their effectiveness in representing the needs of employees.

Design/methodology/approach

The research examines these issues over a five‐year period using a series of employee surveys, interviews and focus groups. This period has also allowed a review of consultation arrangements before and after union recognition and an examination of the outcomes from such arrangements.

Findings

The evidence suggests that the non‐union voice structures at Eurotunnel are used as devices for information and communications rather than true consultation mechanisms or bargaining agents. However, the challenge for the trade union at the Eurotunnel call centre is that what can be regarded as a success in some aspects (increased trade union membership and presence) has not resulted in a change in attitudes towards unions by a majority of Eurotunnel employees. This could be seen as one of the major challenges for union‐employer partnership arrangements.

Research limitations/implications

Generalising the findings of this case to other call centres in non‐union workplaces and firms can be problematic, given the unique ownership and structure of Eurotunnel.

Practical implications

These results would suggest that, while trade unions may provide greater voice than non‐union arrangements, the strength of voice is dependent on the legitimacy and effectiveness of trade unions in representing employees' interests at the workplace. Potentially it could have far‐reaching implications for employers, unions and government policy regarding the structures needed for providing effective consultation and representative structures.

Originality/value

Uniquely, it highlights the potential limitations and dangers for employers and unions in not addressing the needs and expectations of workers in any workplace.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Book part
Publication date: 22 December 2005

Paul J. Gollan

The recent introduction of the European Directive on information and consultation and its forthcoming implementation into United Kingdom (UK) law has increased the focus…

Abstract

The recent introduction of the European Directive on information and consultation and its forthcoming implementation into United Kingdom (UK) law has increased the focus on workplace representation arrangements. This paper examines the interplay between non-union and union representative arrangements at Eurotunnel (UK) and assesses their effectiveness in representing the needs of employees over a five-year period. Importantly, the paper also examines the pros and cons of both non-union employee representation and union voice arrangements. The findings show that the effectiveness of non-union structures as bodies representing the interests of employees in filling the lack of representation is questionable. However, union recognition through an employer-union partnership agreement has also raised important issues regarding the effectiveness, impact and legitimacy of unions at Eurotunnel. The main implication of this research is that the existence of a mechanism – union or non-union – for communication between management and employees at the workplace may not be a sufficient condition for representation of employee interests. Effective employee voice over workplace issues may be essential for achieving and maintaining employee satisfaction. Voice, the right to be heard and having influence over workplace issues and at times an acknowledgement of differing interests may be essential conditions for more effective decision-making process.

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Advances in Industrial & Labor Relations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-265-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

Rosemary Lucas

Using management and employee data from the 1998 workplace employee relations survey, this article attempts to trace “fragments of HRM” within the hospitality industry…

Abstract

Using management and employee data from the 1998 workplace employee relations survey, this article attempts to trace “fragments of HRM” within the hospitality industry (HI) on a comparative basis with all industries and services (AIS) in Great Britain. Four themes are explored: how the management of HRM is organised and practised, “individualism” and “collectivism”, participation and involvement, and other “sophisticated” HR practices. The impact of HRM on employees is assessed. HRM in the HI is found to be very different, thus providing an extreme example of the “retaining control/cost control” approach to management, and a graphic illustration of very “hard” HRM in practice. While HI employees are much more content with their lot than their counterparts in AIS who are subject to rather more “favourable” HRM policies and practices, other indicators imply that there is also dissatisfaction. Qualitative research is necessary to understand whether employees really do enjoy being “kicked hard”. Management might reap greater benefits by adopting more developmental, “soft” HRM practices.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Eleftherios Giovanis

There is an increasing concern on the quality of jobs and productivity witnessed in the flexible employment arrangements. The purpose of this paper is to examine the…

Abstract

Purpose

There is an increasing concern on the quality of jobs and productivity witnessed in the flexible employment arrangements. The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between various flexible employment arrangements and the workplace performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Home-based working, teleworking, flexible timing and compressed hours are the main employment types examined using the Workplace Employee Relations Survey (WERS) over the years 2004 and 2011 in Great Britain. The workplace performance is measured by two outcomes – the financial performance and labour productivity. First, the determinants of these flexible employment types are explored. Second, the ordinary least squares (OLS) method is followed. Third, an instrumental variable (IV) approach is applied to account for plausible endogeneity and to estimate the causal effects of flexible employment types on firm performance.

Findings

The findings show a significant and positive relationship between the flexible employment arrangements and the workplace performance. Education, age, wage, quality of relations between managers-employees, years of experience, the area of the market the workplace is operated and the competition are significant factors and are positively associated with the propensity of the implementation of flexible employment arrangements.

Social implications

The insights derived from the study can have various profound policy implications for employees, employers and the society overall, including family-work balance, coping with family demands, improving the firm performance, reducing traffic congestion and stress among others.

Originality/value

It is the first study that explores the relationship between flexible employment types and workplace performance using an IV approach. This allows us to estimate the causal effects of flexible employment types and the possible associated social implications.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Heinz‐Josef Tüselmann, Frank McDonald and Arne Heise

Based on a representative survey of German subsidiaries in the UK, their parent companies and a comparative analysis to the Workplace Employee Relations Survey 1998, the…

Abstract

Based on a representative survey of German subsidiaries in the UK, their parent companies and a comparative analysis to the Workplace Employee Relations Survey 1998, the article examines the impact of nationality of ownership on employee relations (ER) in German multinational companies (MNCs) operating in an Anglo‐Saxon setting. It also assesses whether in light of heightened international competition and the problems in the German ER model, there has been a weakening of the home country effect over time. The study finds little evidence of a home country effect in relation to ER structures but reveals a pronounced country‐of‐origin effect in the ER approach and style. There is also evidence that German MNCs have responded to the globalisation pressures of the 1990s by a heightened emphasis on the country‐of‐origin collective approach in their UK subsidiaries, whilst at the same time developing comprehensive direct human resource management employee involvement schemes to complement, rather than substitute collective ER.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Raymond Markey, Ann Hodgkinson and Jo Kowalczyk

The international trend in the growth and incidence of “non‐standard employment”, and its highly gendered nature, is well documented. Similarly, interest in employee

Abstract

The international trend in the growth and incidence of “non‐standard employment”, and its highly gendered nature, is well documented. Similarly, interest in employee involvement or participation by academics and practitioners has seen the emergence of a rapidly growing body of literature. Despite the continued interest in each of these areas, the literature is relatively silent when it comes to where the two areas intersect, that is, what the implications are for employee participation in the growth of non‐standard employment. This paper seeks to redress this relative insularity in the literature by examining some broad trends in this area in Australia. The literature lacks one clear, accepted definition of “non‐standard” employment. For ease of definition, and because of the nature of the available data, we focus on part‐time employment in this paper. The paper analyses data from the Australian Workplace Industrial Relations Survey of 1995 (AWIRS 95). It tests the hypotheses that part‐time employees enjoy less access to participatory management practices in the workplace than their full‐time counterparts, and that this diminishes the access to participation in the workplace enjoyed by female workers in comparison with their male colleagues, since the part‐time workforce is predominantly feminised. These hypotheses were strongly confirmed. This has major implications for workplace equity, and for organisational efficiency.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

Paul J. Gollan

It is apparent from existing research in the UK that little is known about how forms ofnon‐union employee representation (NER) are composed, their independence from…

Abstract

It is apparent from existing research in the UK that little is known about how forms ofnon‐union employee representation (NER) are composed, their independence from managerial influence, the “representativeness” of such bodies, and their accountability. In addition, little has been documented about the impact of such structures on either the managerial objective of securing consent to organisational change or the employee objective of influencing managerial decisions. This research will attempt to address these issues by examining NER structures in the UK and, in particular, assessing their effectiveness in representing the needs of employees through an examination of representative arrangements at Eurotunnel. Overall, the evidence suggests that most NER structures are used as devices for consultation and communication rather than as bargaining agents. While it can be argued that consultation, not bargaining, may indeed be their objective, it nevertheless questions the legitimacy of such bodies as true alternatives to unions. This presents the issue of whether state‐sponsored NER forms with provisions for resources and training could improve the effectiveness of NER forms in representing employees’ interests at the workplace. As the Eurotunnel example and previous evidence have indicated, while NER structures can be used as mechanisms for more effective means of communication and consultation, their effectiveness as bodies representing the interests of employees in filling the lack of representation is questionable.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

John Sutherland

This paper uses a matched workplaceemployee data set to examine the extent to which individuals’ experiences of work and experiences of practices at work, as measured by…

Abstract

This paper uses a matched workplaceemployee data set to examine the extent to which individuals’ experiences of work and experiences of practices at work, as measured by selected indicators of worker wellbeing, are explained by the nation state of the head office of the workplace. Seven dimensions of worker wellbeing are identified and examined. The paper establishes that employees have different experiences if employed in a workplace in which the head office is located in France, Germany, Japan or the USA relative to the reference category of being employed in a workplace which is UK‐owned.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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