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Article

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This…

Abstract

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This wealth of material poses problems for the researcher in management studies — and, of course, for the librarian: uncovering what has been written in any one area is not an easy task. This volume aims to help the librarian and the researcher overcome some of the immediate problems of identification of material. It is an annotated bibliography of management, drawing on the wide variety of literature produced by MCB University Press. Over the last four years, MCB University Press has produced an extensive range of books and serial publications covering most of the established and many of the developing areas of management. This volume, in conjunction with Volume I, provides a guide to all the material published so far.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article

D. LANGFORD, S. ROWLINSON and E. SAWACHA

This paper identifies the critical factors that influence the attitudes of construction workers towards safe behaviour on construction sites. It studies these attitudes by…

Abstract

This paper identifies the critical factors that influence the attitudes of construction workers towards safe behaviour on construction sites. It studies these attitudes by using a research model that links three themes: safety management implementation strategies, attitudes of workers about safety and behavioural factors displayed by construction workers. This model is used to frame the responses of 126 directly employed construction workers in 10 companies. Some 56 variables were identified as having a potential influence upon attitudes to safety. The initial data analysis found that 12 technical factors significantly correlated to the development of strong positive attitudes towards safety management. Second‐order analysis, using factor analysis, isolated five variables that had a major influence on safety attitudes. The five factors were: organizing for safety supervision and equipment management, industry norms and culture, attitudes to risk taking and management behaviour.

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Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article

Simon J. Pervan and Liliana L. Bove

– The purpose of this paper is to examine how a crisis affects public attitudes toward stigmatized service workers (SSWs) who are blamed by the media for the event.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how a crisis affects public attitudes toward stigmatized service workers (SSWs) who are blamed by the media for the event.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypotheses grounded in two theories, crisis communication and empathic concern, are tested using two experimental design studies of 180 and 107 adult respondents.

Findings

The effects of both empathy (positive) and anger (negative) on attitudes toward the SSWs involved in crisis are mediated by controllability of attribution of crisis. Empathic concern mitigates negative public attitudes toward stigmatized workers and appears to remove the effect of anger but only when the crisis severity is not too high. In a severe crisis both empathy and anger are important predictors of public response.

Research limitations/implications

Boundary conditions in terms of severity, nature and victim of crisis and media framing need to be investigated.

Practical implications

Proactive crisis management practice is required by professional associations of SSW. Eliciting empathy and paying attention to prior crisis history and professional reputation offers scope to quell public anger and desire for punishment.

Social implications

The attrition rates of socially stigmatized workers following crisis events have profound social and financial costs to society. This study sets a foundation for substantive managerial change in crisis response, and how the perception of socially stigmatized workers, is managed.

Originality/value

This study is the first to examine the voracity of two theories which provide informed but different insights to public response to service workers in crisis.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

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Article

Jasmine Patel, Anthea Tinker and Laurie Corna

The purpose of this paper is to investigate younger workers’ perceptions of older colleagues, including whether there is evidence of ageism.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate younger workers’ perceptions of older colleagues, including whether there is evidence of ageism.

Design/methodology/approach

Convenience sampling was used to recruit ten individuals who were both below the age of 35 and employed at a multigenerational workplace in England. The study is qualitative, involving semi-structured interviews that were audio-recorded, transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis.

Findings

This study found that whilst some younger employees valued working with older colleagues as they believe that their differing characteristics are complementary, others felt that it leads to intergenerational conflict due to contrasting approaches towards work. Positive perceptions of older workers included their increased knowledge and experience, reliability and better social skills; however, ageism was also prevalent, such as the perception of older workers as resistant to change, slower at using technology and lacking the drive to progress. This study also provided evidence for the socioemotional selectivity and social identity theories.

Research limitations/implications

This study has a small sample size and participants were only recruited from London.

Practical implications

In order to create working environments that are conducive to the well-being of employees of all ages, organisations should place an emphasis on reducing intergenerational tension. This could be achieved by team building sessions that provide an opportunity for individuals to understand generational differences.

Originality/value

There is minimal evidence from the UK focussing on the perceptions of specifically younger workers towards older colleagues and the basis of their attitudes. Only by gaining an insight into their attitudes and the reasoning behind them, can efforts be made to decrease ageism.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Article

Hong T.M. Bui, Gordon Liu and Sarah Footner

Based on regulatory focus theory and social exchange theory, the purpose of this paper is to explain how care service workers’ job attitudes, such as job satisfaction…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on regulatory focus theory and social exchange theory, the purpose of this paper is to explain how care service workers’ job attitudes, such as job satisfaction, organizational commitment and perceived organizational support, help form their promotion-focus or prevention-focus perceptions of firms’ HR practices.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey study of 709 residential care service workers was used to test the developed framework with structure equation modeling analysis.

Findings

The empirical results show that the adoption of HR practices in the British care service sector can simultaneously enhance workers’ job motivation and help to correct their work-life imbalance, which have different effects on workers’ job attitudes.

Research limitations/implications

Perceptions of HR practices can create both promotion- and prevention-focussed perceptions from the workers’ perspective. The mixed perceptions about HR practices trigger both perceptions of job motivation and perceptions of work-life imbalance that can then lead to different outcomes with regard to job attitudes.

Practical implications

This study helps practitioners apply HR practices suitably, to certain types of employees in order to drive positive, rather than negative impacts. It is important for managers in the care service industry to take into account the conditions that determine the impacts of HR practices on workers’ job attitudes when deciding to adopt HR practices.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the management literature by providing empirical evidence of the critical role played by job motivation and work-life imbalance in the perceptions of HR practices and job attitudes link.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 37 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article

Luis González and Lorenzo Rivarés

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the referral-based recruitment process in temporary work agencies (TWA) and its influence on workersattitudes and turnover.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the referral-based recruitment process in temporary work agencies (TWA) and its influence on workersattitudes and turnover.

Design/methodology/approach

By means of a quasi-experimental design with equivalent groups and repeated measures, differences in attitudes -group commitment, task commitment, group satisfaction, general job satisfaction and job involvement- and turnover in a group of workers recruited by the TWA through the “bring a friend” procedure based on employee referrals and in another group comprising workers not recruited through employee referrals are studied.

Findings

The results obtained show that workers recruited through employee referrals by the TWA are characterized by having greater group commitment, task commitment, task satisfaction, general job satisfaction and turnover than employees not recruited through employee referrals. These differences are explained on the basis of expectations and the feeling of obligation generated in the recruitment process.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size is an element to take into account when valuing the obtained results. Moreover, the effects of the recruitment programs with employee referral on the TWA should be analyze on more qualified jobs. Furthermore, they should be also evaluated if the effects on the attitudes stay the same in longer periods.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to examine the impact of the employee-referral-based recruitment method known as “bring a friend” on attitudes – group commitment, task commitment, group satisfaction, general job satisfaction, and job involvement – and turnover of employees when used by TWA. Likewise, we want highlight the fact that this is a longitudinal research study.

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Article

Arménio Rego, Andreia Vitória, António Tupinambá, Dálcio Reis Júnior, Dálcio Reis, Miguel Pina e Cunha and Rui Lourenço-Gil

The purpose of this paper is to explore the Brazilian managers’ attitudes toward older workers, and how those attitudes explain HRM decisions in hypothetical scenarios.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the Brazilian managers’ attitudes toward older workers, and how those attitudes explain HRM decisions in hypothetical scenarios.

Design/methodology/approach

Brazilian managers (n=201) reported their attitudes toward older workers and their decisions in scenarios involving an older vs a younger applicant/worker.

Findings

In spite of expressing positive attitudes toward older workers, a significant number of managers chose a younger one even when the older worker is described as more productive. To build a better understanding of how attitudes predict decisions, it is necessary to identify attitudinal profiles and the interplay between attitudinal dimensions, rather than simply studying each dimension separately. Attitudinal profiling also shows that some managers discriminate against younger workers, a finding, that is, ignored when (only) regressions are taken into account. The managers’ attitudes and behavioral intentions relate with their age. Evidence does not support the double jeopardy effect against older women workers.

Research limitations/implications

The sample is small. The scenarios cover a reduced number of HRM decisions. The data about attitudes and decisions were collected simultaneously from a single source. The findings may be influenced by idiosyncrasies of the context. Future studies should also consider real situations, not hypothetical ones.

Practical implications

Efforts must be made (e.g. via training and development) to raise managers’ awareness about the consequences of ageism in organizations.

Originality/value

Empirical studies about managers’ perceptions/attitudes toward older workers are scarce. Studies in the Brazilian context are even scarcer.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article

Robert H. Bennett

There is a strong tradition in cross‐cultural research to posit a relationship between culturally‐derived values and work‐related attitudes, with the most notable work…

Abstract

There is a strong tradition in cross‐cultural research to posit a relationship between culturally‐derived values and work‐related attitudes, with the most notable work conducted by Hofstede (1980). The deeply‐held culturally‐derived values have a powerful influence on the specific cognitions and behaviors that workers develop. On the other hand, this research suggests that situational variables, including the workers' daily activities and work experiences, also influence work‐related attitudes. Situational demands and salient information from one's current experiences affect the nature of attitudes, and on self‐report questionnaires may explain more variation than reported deep‐seated values. Research was conducted on samples of 64 Americans and 47 Chinese workers to contrast the influences on attitudes. Situational variables were shown to strongly influence attitudinal measures, especially in the American sample. Implications for worker education and training and cross‐cultural management are offered.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 9 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

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Book part

Timothy M. Gardner, Niclas L. Erhardt and Carlos Martin-Rios

Two primary approaches have been used to study employment brands and branding. First, there is a long history of the study of organizational attraction. Second, in the…

Abstract

Two primary approaches have been used to study employment brands and branding. First, there is a long history of the study of organizational attraction. Second, in the past 10–15 years, there has been growth in a hybrid stream of research combining branding concepts from the consumer psychology literature with I/O psychology frameworks of organizational attraction and applicant job search behavior. In this chapter, we take an entirely different approach and suggest that the theoretical models built around product/service brand knowledge can readily accommodate employment brands and branding without hybridizing the framework with I/O psychology. This merging of employment brand with product and service brands is accomplished simply by recognizing employment as an economic exchange between workers and employers and recognizing workers as cognitive and emotional beings that vary in their talents and have their own vectors of preferences for the employment offering. After developing a testable model of the components, antecedents, and consequences of employment brand knowledge, we review the existing employment brand and organizational attraction literature and identify multiple opportunities for additional research.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-554-0

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Article

Donatienne Desmette and Mathieu Gaillard

The aim of this paper is to investigate the relationship between perceived social identity as an “older worker” and attitudes towards early retirement and commitment to work.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to investigate the relationship between perceived social identity as an “older worker” and attitudes towards early retirement and commitment to work.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were obtained from 352 workers aged 50‐59. Hierarchical regression analyses were performed to test the influence of social identity after controlling for demographics, organizational variables and work‐to‐family conflict.

Findings

The results show that self‐categorization as an “older worker” is related to negative attitudes towards work (stronger desire to retire early, stronger inclination towards intergenerational competition) while the perception that the organization does not use age as a criterion for distinguishing between workers supports positive attitudes towards work (e.g. higher value placed on work).

Research limitations/implications

This study is cross‐sectional and does not allow conclusions about causality between intergroup processes and attitudes towards works. Future research should develop longitudinal designs to verify that social identity as an “older worker” does induce elders' attitudes at work.

Originality/value

Retirement is usually considered as an individual and opportunistic decision. This research highlights its social dimensions and suggests that managers should pay attention to ageism at work and its potential effects not only on the withdrawal process but also on the quality of life in the workplace.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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